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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

canucklehead2 Oct 14, 2020 12:58 AM

And since the pandemic serious crime and violent crime is up up up... https://edmontonjournal.com/news/loc...-crime-in-2020

10023 Oct 14, 2020 6:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 9072082)
People with a conscience do not look at the aged as depreciating assets. I agree that lockdowns should be scaled back and people should be allowed to use their best judgement (within reason) but this cavalier disregard for a huge subset of the population are why have lockdowns and restrictions.

The NHS has to make these shitty distinctions because it's a nationalized healthcare system and thus prioritize finite financial resources.

As opposed to America’s infinite financial resources for healthcare? This is why healthcare costs are out of control.

We are all depreciating assets from the moment we reach adulthood.

Is there anyone here who wouldn’t give up 10 years at the end of life to have the last 10 years to live over again? If not then I suspect you’re lying, or at least not being honest with yourself.

10023 Oct 14, 2020 6:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by canucklehead2 (Post 9072267)
I'm immune compromised (found that out late last year just before COVID-19) so I'm very anxious and careful when going out these days which isn't often. Masks on, hands washed.

Movie theatres used to be a 2-3 times a week activity for me, now even though it's open I don't visit. Instead I bought myself a full HD projector and a 100 inch screen.

Most people where I live currently don't take it seriously and don't wear masks or wash their hands so naturally these places have lost my business forever including the grocery store where I was attacked on July 10 for wearing a mask...

You used to go to the movies 2-3 times per week, and now have a 100-inch TV screen? No offense, but I am genuinely curious, is your immune condition linked to obesity, or inactivity/too much time indoors generally?

10023 Oct 14, 2020 6:29 AM

Think about what students are going through.

It’s late October in Madison, WI. It’s cold and dark out. You live in a cramped dorm or share a messy apartment with some roommate you barely get along with. Bars are effectively closed (need a reservation, very strictly over 21). You can’t really find a place to work or study because of social distancing at libraries, etc., so no just dropping in to Helen C. White to post up with your laptop and get some social interaction.

They are going to lose more students to suicide than Covid.

Pedestrian Oct 14, 2020 7:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9072489)
You used to go to the movies 2-3 times per week, and now have a 100-inch TV screen? No offense, but I am genuinely curious, is your immune condition linked to obesity, or inactivity/too much time indoors generally?

If it were, does that mean the person is guilty and therefore expendable in your view?

Isn't that reminiscent of the prevailing opinion in another European country in the 1930s?

JManc Oct 14, 2020 7:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9072488)
As opposed to America’s infinite financial resources for healthcare? This is why healthcare costs are out of control.

We are all depreciating assets from the moment we reach adulthood.

Is there anyone here who wouldn’t give up 10 years at the end of life to have the last 10 years to live over again? If not then I suspect you’re lying, or at least not being honest with yourself.

This sounds like Gordon Gekko with a hint of Nietzsche...

SIGSEGV Oct 14, 2020 7:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9072490)
Think about what students are going through.

It’s late October in Madison, WI. It’s cold and dark out. You live in a cramped dorm or share a messy apartment with some roommate you barely get along with. Bars are effectively closed (need a reservation, very strictly over 21). You can’t really find a place to work or study because of social distancing at libraries, etc., so no just dropping in to Helen C. White to post up with your laptop and get some social interaction.

They are going to lose more students to suicide than Covid.

Pretty sure all the students in dorms have already been sent home.

Pedestrian Oct 14, 2020 7:39 PM

Quote:

Goodbye, Sunny Florida. Hello, Frigid Winter. Covid Strands Canadian Snowbirds
By Paul Vieira
Oct. 14, 2020 12:08 pm ET

For the first time in a quarter-century, Carol Barlow and her husband, Dale, won’t escape the Canadian winter.

Normally, the Barlows climb into their car in November and high-tail out of Davidson, Saskatchewan, a farming town in the Canadian prairies where the winter temperature averages about 7 degrees Fahrenheit. Their destination is sunny Mesa, Ariz., where they own a mobile home.

Like many of the million-strong flock of Canadian snowbirds, the Barlows have been thwarted by the coronavirus. In March, the U.S.-Canada border was closed to land crossings by tourists going either direction. A reopening isn’t immediately in the cards, Canadian officials have said, and the federal government has a travel advisory discouraging all nonessential travel abroad.

So this winter, Ms. Barlow is stocking up on sweaters because she and her husband are trading balmy Arizona sunshine for Osoyoos, British Columbia, just north of the Washington state border, where the average winter temperature is 32. “We think we are safer in Canada,” says Ms. Barlow, who is 77 years old. She knows it will snow in Osoyoos, “but it should be gone the next day,” she says.

The Canadian Snowbird Association says its members are retired or semiretired people who travel outside of Canada for 31 or more consecutive nights a year, mostly in the winter. The group estimates that 60% gravitate to Florida, with sizable contingents also heading to Arizona and Texas.

“We really find winter to be very unpleasant—not just the weather but the shoveling of the snow,” says Jacques Caron , 71, a retired financial consultant from the Montreal area. “And the driving is god-awful.”

He and his wife, Elaine Poirier , spend half the year at a property they bought in 2016 in Sebastian, Fla., on the Atlantic coast, and the rest in their trailer in a private campground about 40 miles east of Montreal. “It’s a different lifestyle,

Some RV owners are eyeing British Columbia, where winter isn’t as harsh. Canada’s westernmost province is home to some 100 year-round campgrounds with RV hookups, many of them on Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands . . . .

Although the land border is closed, Canadians are allowed to fly into the U.S., so long as they haven’t visited certain countries and regions in the 14 days before . . . .

https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-s...s&page=1&pos=1

The article also notes that some Canadians have an even bigger problem besides the travelling restrictions: They no longer own any winter clothes.

Pedestrian Oct 14, 2020 7:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 9073204)
Pretty sure all the students in dorms have already been sent home.

Not in China. Guinea pigs there are kept in dorms, not cages:

Quote:

Chinese Firm Gives Experimental Covid Vaccines to Students
By Chao Deng
Updated Oct. 14, 2020 12:54 pm ET

China is expanding distribution of its coronavirus vaccines outside of clinical trials, with a state-owned company offering them to students going abroad amid a campaign by officials to boost public confidence in homegrown inoculations.

China National Biotec Group Co., a division of state-owned Sinopharm that is developing two Covid-19 vaccines, was giving them free to Chinese students planning to study abroad, according to a company website and students who applied for it.

The offer appears to be the latest example of the company using an emergency-use approval to distribute vaccines to hundreds of thousands of people outside of clinical trials . . . .

As China prepares to roll out its vaccines for the public as early as next month, many Western health experts and pharmaceutical companies warn that its government and companies are potentially endangering public health by releasing unproven shots . . . .

. . . China has already injected hundreds of thousands of people with vaccines outside of clinical trials, including the two being developed by Sinopharm, under an “emergency-use” approval that began in July. The third vaccine approved for emergency use is being developed by private Chinese firm Sinovac . . . .

Yiwu He, the chief innovation officer at the University of Hong Kong, is working on his own Covid-19 vaccine candidate. He said he views China’s leading vaccines as relatively safe because they are based on older vaccine-making technologies that use viruses that have been inactivated, or killed, to trigger an immune response in the body. Newer technologies behind leading vaccine candidates in the U.S. and the U.K. have less of a track record, he said.

Ultimately, the reason Chinese people are comfortable getting injected, Mr. He said, is that they believe in the government’s ability to shepherd Covid-19 vaccinations successfully . . . .
https://www.wsj.com/articles/chinese...s&page=1&pos=1

TWAK Oct 15, 2020 1:28 AM

It's still not impacting things very much besides wearing masks and 30% seating (or something). This summer was basically the same...fires...bay area boats....ect.

chris08876 Oct 15, 2020 2:00 AM

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...0c92f05000.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...8e6c225fda.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...d6ae3cb905.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...83cf23e95b.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...7e118ddda8.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...8f55d98506.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...66f34fccf1.png

All via nyc.gov covid stats tracker

Acajack Oct 15, 2020 2:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9073205)
https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-s...s&page=1&pos=1

The article also notes that some Canadians have an even bigger problem besides the travelling restrictions: They no longer own any winter clothes.

First world problems...

xzmattzx Oct 15, 2020 3:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliNative (Post 9072217)
Some of the countries that have almost contained their outbreaks because of good public health practices (masks, social distancing, contact tracing): Singapore, New Zealand, Greece, S. Korea, Uruguay. There are others. Now these countries can open up with caution and can get "herd immunity" from a vaccine that should be available next year rather than people getting sick from the virus. If the U.S. had stuck with correct public health practices the economy would be open and much better off now and people would be going back to work. In New Zealand life is back to normal and viral rates are so low that they don't need to wear masks. The U.S. should have followed these examples of correct public health measures. We would be OK by now and the number of deaths would have been much lower. Needless deaths. When you can't go to work it is because we didn't listen to the scientific experts. Public health became a political football.

Isn't the economy open in the US? What exactly is taking place in South Korea or New Zealand that is not taking place in the US? If anything, I thought that people were complaining that the US opened the economy back up too soon, not that it's still closed even today.

Also, doesn't Sweden also not need to wear masks, for doing the opposite and letting the coronavirus run its course moreso than other countries? Photos of Stockholm in July show packed streets, with no masks, and old people out and about just like young people.

CaliNative Oct 15, 2020 5:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9073191)
If it were, does that mean the person is guilty and therefore expendable in your view?

Isn't that reminiscent of the prevailing opinion in another European country in the 1930s?

Quote:

Originally Posted by xzmattzx (Post 9073717)
Isn't the economy open in the US? What exactly is taking place in South Korea or New Zealand that is not taking place in the US? If anything, I thought that people were complaining that the US opened the economy back up too soon, not that it's still closed even today.

Also, doesn't Sweden also not need to wear masks, for doing the opposite and letting the coronavirus run its course moreso than other countries? Photos of Stockholm in July show packed streets, with no masks, and old people out and about just like young people.

My point was that the countries that shut down and used social distancing/masks for a while and didn't open up prematurely until case counts fell to negligible are doing OK. The U.S. gave up early on these measures and now we are going way up again in cases. Herd immunity policies without vaccines/therapeuticswill just kill and sicken millions. And the "immunity" gained may not last long, since the virus will probably evolve into new strains like the common cold and flu. Each year we will need a new vaccine. Herd immunity is a terrible idea without vaccines or therapeutics. Nearly all the public health experts including Doc. Fauci say herd immunity is a terrible strategy. Plus the economy will stay depressed as long as the virus is out of control. Older people have the money but they will not go out and spend with the virus out of control because they are terrified of catching it. Control the virus by good public health practices, then open up. We gave up on this and now we are in trouble again, as is much of Europe.

10023 Oct 15, 2020 5:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TWAK (Post 9073601)
It's still not impacting things very much besides wearing masks and 30% seating (or something). This summer was basically the same...fires...bay area boats....ect.

You must lead a very different life to mine. And obviously cities are impacted to a much, much greater degree.

Acajack Oct 15, 2020 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9073788)
You must lead a very different life to mine. And obviously cities are impacted to a much, much greater degree.

I am a married guy with kids who lives in the suburbs, with 100% capacity to work at home and be paid in full, and the same for my wife. No one around me has caught COVID.

And yet this virus (and especially the reactions and measures in response to it) has had a pretty big impact on my life.

Like not being able to see my parents (who don't live that far away) for months on end, to the death of a very important family member for whom we haven't even been able to organize a proper funeral.

Just two examples.

chris08876 Oct 19, 2020 1:53 AM

Gov. Cuomo unveils New York coronavirus vaccine plan, prioritization phases

Video Link


Quote:

Gov. Cuomo said Sunday phases will be used to decide when vaccines will be distributed to certain groups. The first prioritization phase would go to high-risk individuals and front-line workers.

someone123 Oct 22, 2020 5:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 9073866)
Like not being able to see my parents (who don't live that far away) for months on end, to the death of a very important family member for whom we haven't even been able to organize a proper funeral.

Just two examples.

Pretty similar to my situation. I consider myself one of the luckiest possible people around as far as covid goes. But it's still caused a bunch of problems, the most serious being difficulties with visiting family members. I think the elderly family members have been hit the hardest with loneliness. I don't know of anybody in my social circle who has gotten covid but I know a few people who lost their jobs.

I've also noticed I have a lot of friends I used to occasionally see when out doing things I no longer do, and it's hard to organize life now in a way that preserves those relationships. That was not a big deal for the first month or two but I wonder what will be left of these social ties across our society 6 months from now.

JManc Oct 22, 2020 7:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 9082096)
Pretty similar to my situation. I consider myself one of the luckiest possible people around as far as covid goes. But it's still caused a bunch of problems, the most serious being difficulties with visiting family members. I think the elderly family members have been hit the hardest with loneliness. I don't know of anybody in my social circle who has gotten covid but I know a few people who lost their jobs.

I've also noticed I have a lot of friends I used to occasionally see when out doing things I no longer do, and it's hard to organize life now in a way that preserves those relationships. That was not a big deal for the first month or two but I wonder what will be left of these social ties across our society 6 months from now.

They will suffer drastically. I could not imagine going through this single and in my 20's...prime social years. I've noticed people having become borderline paranoid hypochondriac even towards friends and family they know are taking similar precautions. I think the enduring effects on social interactions will be far more damaging than the actual virus itself.

LA21st Oct 22, 2020 8:35 PM

I used to fly to Chicago once a year to visit friends and stay at their houses. That's out, and who knows how long.

In LA, some friends won't meet anywhere anymore. Some do, but when I go, it's hard to think about the virus and I never truly feel at ease. These aren't even large gatherings. Maybe 3-5?

I've been invited to stuff, but I'm weary so I don't go. It's abosuletly crushing when you think about it and what the future is. Luckily, I hike pretty hard 3 days a week on less crowded trails where it feels somewhat safer. I won't give that up.


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