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ethereal_reality Jul 29, 2018 6:07 AM

Let's return to our Noir roots.

"Unidentified woman found dead in Griffith Park." [1935]

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/580y7h.jpg
EBAY

I wonder if they were ever able to identify this poor woman?


https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/TKG31j.jpg

Do you think we could figure it out using the date stamped on the reverse, July 2, 1935.

I tried but I don't have access to old Los Angeles Times.

_

HossC Jul 29, 2018 10:44 AM

:previous:

There's a story that hit the newspapers on June 28, 1935 that seems to fit the bill. The victim was Miss Frances Conklin, and the alleged murderer was her lover, Daniel Nield.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...esConklin1.jpg
newspaperarchive.com

About half of the articles I found gave their ages as 42 and 61, while the others put them both at 41. This one hints at the motive.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...esConklin2.jpg
newspaperarchive.com

Just to confuse things, some newspapers reported that it was Frances' mother who accompanied them. I don't have access to newspapers.com, but here's the text from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

His story, the detectives said, told of a picnic that ended in a lover's quarrel when Nield accused Miss Conklin of "not loving" him. The couple, accompanied by the woman's 84-year-old mother, Mrs. Maria Conklin, were on a picnic in the park where Miss Conklin was shot. Leaving the mother alone, the two sauntered off together. The quarrel and the shooting followed, the detectives said. The aged mother, abandoned In the park and taken to her home by a stroller, did not know of her daughter's death until early today.

HossC Jul 29, 2018 11:15 AM

It appears that the listing for the aerial view of the Civic Center is no longer available. I hope that's because someone at NLA bought the photo.
Here's the enlargement I tried to post yesterday (I'll still be emailing PB's tech support):

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...a.jpg~original

GaylordWilshire Jul 29, 2018 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8265530)
:previous:

There's a story that hit the newspapers on June 28, 1935 that seems to fit the bill. The victim was Miss Frances Conklin, and the alleged murderer was her lover, Daniel Nield.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...esConklin1.jpg
newspaperarchive.com

About half of the articles I found gave their ages as 42 and 61, while the others put them both at 41. This one hints at the motive.
Just to confuse things, some newspapers reported that it was Frances' mother who accompanied them. I don't have access to newspapers.com, but here's the text from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

His story, the detectives said, told of a picnic that ended in a lover's quarrel when Nield accused Miss Conklin of "not loving" him. The couple, accompanied by the woman's 84-year-old mother, Mrs. Maria Conklin, were on a picnic in the park where Miss Conklin was shot. Leaving the mother alone, the two sauntered off together. The quarrel and the shooting followed, the detectives said. The aged mother, abandoned In the park and taken to her home by a stroller, did not know of her daughter's death until early today.


Daniel Webster NieldS is in the 1940 census at San Quentin, age 66...and it seems that he was a great uncle of Deanna Durbin's husband Vaughan Paul Jr.


https://s22.postimg.cc/hyd476969/deanna1.bmp.jpg

Lorendoc Jul 29, 2018 6:43 PM

Daniel Nields
 
Served 11 years for murder:

https://i.imgur.com/OhAGaVm.jpg
ancestry.com

odinthor Jul 29, 2018 6:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8265530)

:hell: 61 elderly? :hell:

CityBoyDoug Jul 29, 2018 7:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by odinthor (Post 8265799)
:hell: 61 elderly? :hell:

I had the same thought. When my aunt was 84, she told me that 60 year olds were ''youthful".

In the case of the picnic murder, one has to wonder why was Daniel Nield going on the Griffith Park picnic with a loaded gun in his pocket. Common sense tells me that when
he left home that day, he had murder on his mind....premeditated.

Picnic? How about....sandwiches, chips, drinks, pickles, cake....no no no. But yeah, take a loaded gun....so romantic.

HossC Jul 29, 2018 8:07 PM

:previous:

According to a page at www.infoplease.com, average life expectancy at birth for a white male in 1935 was 61 years (and 65 for a white female). Those figures increased to 76.5 years and 81.3 years respectively for 2010. Other sources give similar numbers for 1935.

Noir_Noir Jul 29, 2018 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 8265862)

In the case of the picnic murder, one has to wonder why was Daniel Nield going on the Griffith Park picnic with a loaded gun in his pocket. Common sense tells me that when
he left home that day, he had murder on his mind....premeditated.

Picnic? How about....sandwiches, chips, drinks, pickles, cake....no no no...yeah, a loaded gun.


https://i.imgur.com/s8XEKOG.jpg
newspaperarchive.com

odinthor Jul 30, 2018 12:20 AM

It appears that 60+ was the normal acceptation of "elderly" about the time of the murder. Golly!

Here's an editorial from the Los Angeles Times of December 29, 1934:

https://s26.postimg.cc/ke41et87d/elder12-29-34.jpg
Los Angeles Times via ProQuest via CSULB Library.

Scott Charles Jul 30, 2018 1:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8265871)
:previous:

According to a page at www.infoplease.com, average life expectancy at birth for a white male in 1935 was 61 years (and 65 for a white female). Those figures increased to 76.5 years and 81.3 years respectively for 2010. Other sources give similar numbers for 1935.

My dad (white male) was born in 1922, and lived to be 93. I've always been terrible at math, but by those numbers, wouldn't that be over a 50% lifespan improvement?

I guess he did pretty well!

ethereal_reality Jul 30, 2018 1:07 AM

While looking for something unrelated I happened upon this interesting list. I was surprised by how many names I recognized.

Los Angeles STAR, July 17, 1852 [SIZE="1"]

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/k4NoRy.jpg
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/zA2X1Q.jpg
california newspaper archive

_

tovangar2 Jul 30, 2018 1:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8265439)
does anyone else see honest Abe?

_

Maybe it was the power of suggestion, but I never questioned your ID. I saw only Lincoln.

ethereal_reality Jul 30, 2018 1:50 AM

I believe this is the first time I've come across a night time view from the observation deck of Los Angeles City Hall. It got me wondering
about the hours it was open to the public. Was it a rare occurance to be able to go up there at night?

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/ZcTrvI.jpg
EBAY [1950s] -sold

I didn't realize the neon letters of the Times Building were blue and the clock gold. (of course the camera could be inadvertently playing tricks)

I never gave it much thought because almost all the vintage photographs of the Times Building are in black n' white.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/WCnWNb.jpg
latimes

Dec. 1, 1957: "A Los Angeles Times truck, one of a fleet of 70, leaves The Times building with 5 tons of newspapers."

One of 70 trucks! WOW
__


Rest in peace Frances Conklin. I appreciate all the help in identifying her.

ethereal_reality Jul 30, 2018 2:14 AM

While trying to locate the above :previous: slide again, I happened upon a second slide from the same seller. -perhaps the same photographer as well.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/riE7sS.jpg
EBAY



A closer look at the street below.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/Tmrqe8.jpg
detail

the building on the left, especially the second half, looks somewhat...how do I put it...softened...(almost like sand sculptures)
You know, like the pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers before they're completely turned into 'humans'...that sort of thing.
___

I could have also classified this post as a 'mystery' vantage point.

Where was the photographer when he took this view? :shrug:

odinthor Jul 30, 2018 3:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8266105)
While looking for something unrelated I happened upon this interesting list. I was surprised by how many names I recognized.

Los Angeles STAR, July 17, 1852 [SIZE="1"]

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/k4NoRy.jpg
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/zA2X1Q.jpg
california newspaper archive

_

Quite so, e_r, lots of old friends there!

Here are my notes on the more obscure ones:

Lyman, Amasa April 4, 1857, ad (Los Angeles Star): in partnership with Charles C. Rich, appointing Ebenezer Hanks to settle all their “business pertaining to ranch of San Bernardino."

Rich, Charles C. (Gen.) May 10, 1856, published (Los Angeles Star): mentioned as mayor of San Bernardino; May 2, 1857, published (Los Angeles Star): “Our correspondent informs us that on Saturday week Gen. C.C. Rich, and Col. Lyman, with thirty more members of the Mormon church, started from San Bernardino for Great Salt Lake City. The train consisted of about thirty wagons. The party was escorted by a large number of the citizens, as far as the Cajon Pass, where they encamped and passed the night. Next morning the friends separated and the emigrants proceeded on their journey to the Mecca of the Great Prophet.”

Douglass & Sanford February 28, 1852, ad (Los Angeles Star): “Forwarding and Commission Merchants. San Pedro, Cal. Are now prepared to forward goods to Los Angeles, also to receive, store, and forward them to San Francisco, Santa Barbara, etc.”; July 24, 1852, ad (Los Angeles Star): “Would announce to the citizens of Southern California, that they are now receiving, at their stores in San Pedro and Los Angeles, the Best selected Stock of Merchandise ever brought to this market, consisting of Dry Goods, Hard Ware, Boots, Shoes, Cutlery, Provisions, Hats, Caps, Blacksmith’s Tools, Farming Utensils, Saddlery, Rifles, Percussion Caps, Powder, Shot Guns, Lead, Colt’s Army and Navy Pistols, &c. &c., all of which they offer at Wholesale and Retail”; January 15, 1853, rumor in the Los Angeles Star that the firm was about to sell out to “the new firm” Alexander & Banning, which had been accomplished by the issue of February 26, 1853, though “the stock of Goods formerly belonging to Messrs. Douglass & Sanford” was purchased by the firm of Foster & Wadhams; November 12, 1853, published (Los Angeles Star): notice of dissolution of partnership, Sanford purchasing the remains; the Douglass is J.R. Douglass, and the Sanford is William T.B. Sanford.

Douglass, J.R. seen also, frequently, as D.R. Douglass; July 17, 1852, published (Los Angeles Star): J.R. Douglass, Esq., Mayor of San Pedro, accompanied by a number of citizens, all superbly mounted, followed” in a 4th of July procession; 1852, pres. the Douglass of the San-Pedro-located firm Douglass & Sanford; 1854, the Douglass of Douglass, Foster & Wadhams; September, 1854, left the partnership; 1855, Grand Juror.

Sanford, William T.B. (Capt.) very frequently seen also as Sandford; ca. 1815, born in Kentucky; some time pre-L.A., of Jesus Maria, Sonora, Mexico; ca. 1850?, received title to Rancho San Jose de Buenos Ayres, evidently in partnership with Dr. Wilson Jones; the city’s second Postmaster at some time, presumably in the early or mid-1850s; 1854, co-lender with B.D. Wilson of $1,500 to Tomas Talamantes (who later defaulted); 1854, partner of George Carson in hardware business on Commercial St.; July 8, 1854, published (Los Angeles Star): “Mr. W.T.B. Sanford is completing a large two story building on Main street, designed for a store and printing office, a brick and frame dwelling on the same street [across from which there was a stone yard], and also a two story brick store on Vineyard street, intended for a wholesale and retail grocery and provision store. These improvements will cost about $15,000”; 1855, with Banning & Alexander, engaged in opening trade route between Salt Lake City and L.A.; 1855, going to Salt Lake City (see below) and leaving Dr. Henry Myles in charge of his affairs; December 19, 1857, published (Los Angeles Star): “Mr. Sanford is an old resident of this city, has had great experience as a Santa Fé trader, and the most implicit reliance may be placed not only on the statements made, but on the opinions expressed by him. He is at present [1857] residing at San Pedro, being connected with Mr. Banning, in his extensive forwarding and commission business. Mr. W.T.B. Sanford left Los Angeles on the 1st of May, 1855, for Great Salt Lake City, with fifteen wagons, each freighting 5,000 pounds, drawn by ten mules. [There follows a relation, which we omit, of the route taken and its particulars.] I left Salt Lake city on the 7th of August, and arrived in Los Angeles on the 17th of September, with the same mules and wagons, having made the return journey in forty-one days”; December 8, 1855, published (Los Angeles Star): “Sheriff’s Sale. By virtue of a decree of foreclosure […] in the action of Samuel Kaufmann against W.T.B. Sanford […], I am commanded to sell the following property, to wit: All that piece, parcel or lot of land, lying and being situate in the City and County of Los Angeles, State of California, bounded and described as follows to wit: on the Easterly side by Los Angeles Street; on the Southerly side by the lot of Matthew Keller; on the Westerly by the lot of Obed Macy, and on the Northerly side by the lot of Childs & Hicks; fronting on said street about thirty-six (36) feet, and running back the same about seventy feet by equal width […]”; September 5, 1857, published (Los Angeles Star): elected Justice of the Peace for San Pedro; March 6, 1858, published (Los Angeles Star): For non-payment of taxes, the City Marshal is poised to sell the following described property: “personal property, $1000”; 1858, sold his portion of Rancho San Jose de Buenos Ayres to B.D. Wilson; 1860, present in San Pedro district without stated savings or real estate; March 1, 1862, published (Los Angeles Star): on the Grand Jury; April 27, 1863, killed in the Ada Hancock disaster, in which incident his mother was wounded; sister Rebecca married Phineas Banning; also in 1863, brother John was murdered; brother Cyrus of La Ballona.

Yndarte, Feliciana ca. 1851-1852, daughter of Jose Domingo Yndarte, which lattermost died August or October 11, 1851, perhaps at sea.

Manso, Juan ca. 1814, born in Spain; 1844, present in L.A. as a businessman (he was affiliated with German tradesman Enrique Virmond) and bachelor; 1845, comisionado (with Andres Pico) inventorying ex-Mission San Gabriel and other missions; December 5, 1845, co-leased ex-Mission San Fernando Rey (with Andres Pico); July, 1848, godparent at Plaza church, soltero; late 1848, with Andres Pico at the goldfields, supervising Pico’s workers; October 16, 1852, published (Los Angeles Star): executor of the estate of Jose Antonio Menendez, and evidently living at the house of the Yndarte Bros. on Main St.

T.S. Colima is probably one of the Colima-Sanchezes, perhaps Telesforo Tomas Colima-Sanchez; usually called Tomas; December 19, 1804, baptized at Mission San Gabriel; father, Juan Francisco Sanchez; 1823, present in L.A. in the militia; 1823, on L.A. church compliancy list; September 25, 1825, married Josefa Maria Lisalde at Mission San Gabriel; ca. 1828-1830, ev. in the San Diego area; 1830s, residing at Rancho Los Coyotes; 1836, present at Rancho Los Coyotes as landowner and laborer; 1839, present at A. Pico’s Rancho Los Coyotes; 1843, recaudador; 1843, contributed towards the city’s plan to build a barracks and government house; 1844, juez de campo; December 6, 1846, officer under Pico, present at the battle of San Pascual; December, 1846, after the Battle of San Pascual, took charge of the captured Alexis P. Godey, detaining or indeed hosting him at his (Sanchez’s) house in L.A.; January 8, 1847, aide-de-camp for Jose Maria Flores at the Battle of Bartolo Pass; 1849, regidore; 1850, present in the Downey area as a farmer with assets of $2,000; 1853, owner of a portion of Rancho Santa Gertrudes; 1855, owner of a vineyard at which or near which murder victims were frequently found; April 26, 1856, published (Los Angeles Star): unsuccessful candidate to be delegate “to a nominating convention”; 1857, aided Pico’s efforts to punish the murderers of Sheriff Barton; April 4, 1857, published (Los Angeles Star): member of the Board of Supervisors; 1860, present in Nietos as a farmer with savings of $16,000 and real estate valued at $5,000; 1877, still alive; children: Maria Antonia Dolores, Vicenta, Jose Engracia Patricio, Maria Silveria, Maria Andrea, Nicolas, Jose de Gracia.

I'll spare everyone notes on all the rest! ;)

ScottyB Jul 30, 2018 5:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by odinthor (Post 8266195)

I'll spare everyone notes on all the rest! ;)

Thanks odinthor, I love the notes; I loved your recent book, too, btw!

HossC Jul 30, 2018 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8266142)

I believe this is the first time I've come across a night time view from the observation deck of Los Angeles City Hall. It got me wondering
about the hours it was open to the public. Was it a rare occurance to be able to go up there at night?

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/ZcTrvI.jpg
EBAY [1950s] -sold

I posted a 1967 Julius Shulman photoset back in November 2015 that included a few color night-time shots from City Hall. The full post is here.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7244588)


HossC Jul 30, 2018 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8266161)

While trying to locate the above :previous: slide again, I happened upon a second slide from the same seller. -perhaps the same photographer as well.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/riE7sS.jpg
EBAY

I could have also classified this post as a 'mystery' vantage point.

Where was the photographer when he took this view? :shrug:

I think the photographer was on the Health Building (more recently known as City Hall South) which we discussed back in May. There's a 1953 photo from e_r which shows it nearing completion in post #46918, and my follow-up, post #46927, also contains the building permits as well as the 1961 image below.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8191106)


GaylordWilshire Jul 30, 2018 1:09 PM

Back to Deanna Durbin for a minute

Deanna—who ER imagined with Judy in this post way back in 2011—lived at 421 North Saltair in Brentwood while she was married to the great-nephew of the Griffith Park Killer. I thought I'd seen the house here on NLA before, but it must have been on the estimable Steve Vaught's estimable Paradise Leased blog. Vaught details everything you ever wanted to know about Deanna Durbin, except the story of her withered arm, or allegedly withered arm. That's the first thing I ever heard about DD, the withered arm. It was a game to try to spot it onscreen, like looking for Harold's Lloyd's injured right hand. She was relentlessly chirpy.


421 N Saltair: While the architect, Allen G. Siple, was apparently highly regarded, I think this is kind of a mishmash. About the only thing I like about it is the diaper-brick chimney. More pics, exterior and interior, are in the Paradise Leased post linked above.


https://s22.postimg.cc/v9fo8prht/deannasaltair.bmp.jpg


The BPs...the house burned in the 1961 Bel-Air fire and was replaced. I thought it interesting that the DBS had a special rubber stamp made for buildings affected... "FIRE-November 1961":

https://s22.postimg.cc/z9mtlc02p/saltair_BPnew.bmp.jpghttps://s22.postimg.cc/mi8neul5t/saltairfire.bmp.jpg


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