SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   Found City Photos (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=23)
-   -   noirish Los Angeles (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=170279)

Martin Pal Mar 14, 2018 5:59 PM

1199 Pasadena Ave.

A craftsman house built in 1911. The house has been boarded up and vacant for 35 years. It was one of Julia Child's homes while growing up and is mentioned fondly
in the chef’s biography, Appetite for Life: The Biography of Julia Child.

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/Oi4D...38.07_AM.0.pngGoogle Street View

Child’s family home and several other historic houses lining Pasadena Avenue are owned by Caltrans. The agency bought the houses over 50 years ago in anticipation
of a never-built extension of the 710 Freeway through Pasadena.

It’s unlikely that the freeway project will ever get built. Metro voted last May not to build a tunnel that would extend the 710 freeway up to the 210, instead
opting for smaller-scale improvements in the area.

Caltrans still owns hundreds of houses that were expected to be demolished for the freeway extension project, and began selling some of them off in late 2016.
The Tribune says none of the historic houses on Pasadena Avenue have been put up for sale.

https://la.curbed.com/2018/3/12/1710...-710-expansion

A less flattering shot, taken last Friday.
https://www.pasadenastarnews.com/wp-...0311.jpg?w=620
https://www.pasadenastarnews.com/201...g-in-pasadena/

Bristolian Mar 15, 2018 1:41 AM

And now for something completely different...
 
I searched and couldn't find anything so I believe this photo is new to NLA. This photo was taken in 1964 and and shows the completed 11' original Star Trek U.S.S. Enterprise and three of the four men who built it.
I'm assuming this photo was taken somewhere around L.A. because of the obvious TV and movie connection plus the background looks like LA/SFV/Burbank to me and the license plates look to be black and gold California types.

https://i.imgur.com/h0kek6d.jpg?1
https://geektyrant.com/news/photo-of...n-who-built-it

A little more information is available by clicking on the link.

I haven't bothered to try to identify the exact location but if anybody knows or feels like taking a shot, have at it.

odinthor Mar 15, 2018 2:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8117798)
"Francisco Lopez pulled wild onions near an oak tree on his Placerita Canyon Ranch and found gold nuggets caught in their roots."

lol, no doubt odinthor. I'd return from the trip with a trunk full of wild onions!

[...]

e_r, here are the ones to look for. These wild onions are the species likely to be found around where Señor Lopez took his nap under that oak tree . . .

https://s26.postimg.org/okfd5r4uh/onions.jpg

Scott Charles Mar 15, 2018 4:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bristolian (Post 8120377)
I searched and couldn't find anything so I believe this photo is new to NLA. This photo was taken in 1964 and and shows the completed 11' original Star Trek U.S.S. Enterprise and three of the four men who built it.
I'm assuming this photo was taken somewhere around L.A. because of the obvious TV and movie connection plus the background looks like LA/SFV/Burbank to me and the license plates look to be black and gold California types.

https://i.imgur.com/h0kek6d.jpg?1
https://geektyrant.com/news/photo-of...n-who-built-it

A little more information is available by clicking on the link.

I haven't bothered to try to identify the exact location but if anybody knows or feels like taking a shot, have at it.

Being a big fan of the original TV show, I LOVE that photo!

I found it online a few years ago, and had to track down its location. It looked like Burbank to me, and it didn't take too long to find:

https://i.imgur.com/TMMW9Va.jpg

East Providentia Ave, between South First Street (now called South Ikea Way) and San Fernando Blvd. The Media Center Church can be seen in the background.

Here is the location on Google Maps:

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.1761...2!8i6656?hl=en

Bristolian Mar 15, 2018 4:27 AM

:previous:

Scott, that didn't take long, nicely done!

I'm not a Trekkie at all but I do model making and fabrication so I'm interested from that angle. I'm curious about how it was made and what materials were used. Also, those builders remind me of some of the old timers I used to work with when I was younger.

ethereal_reality Mar 15, 2018 4:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Noir_Noir (Post 8119178)
Hi there Scott. Apologies, I misread the caption on the publicity picture.

It wasn't your fault Noir. I am the one that said Elva was second from the left.
That said, I appreciate your two follow-up posts very much.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott Charles
re: Elva's house in Echo Park.

Things like this utterly fascinate me; I'll be sure to drive by and check it out as soon as I can!

They fascinate me too Scotty. I tried to imagine the house in 1920. It no doubt had a nice front yard (now paved over for parking :()


https://i.imgur.com/osfo980.gif

At first glance, I thought two bathing beauties had been killed hitting the deck before Elva's successful dive.
I was quite relieved to find out that wasn't the case. [your gif's message is clear. I have a tendency to jump the gun more times than not]
(by the way, all your creative gifs are exceptional)

Now we need to figure out the name of the 'ship' movie.
__



Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott Charles

Grandpa Charlie was primarily a Sennett director.

Elva's sister Olive (who was D.W. Griffith's secretary)

I'm speechless :previous:

Scott Charles Mar 15, 2018 4:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bristolian (Post 8120551)
:previous:

Scott, that didn't take long, nicely done!

I'm not a Trekkie at all but I do model making and fabrication so I'm interested from that angle. I'm curious about how it was made and what materials were used. Also, those builders remind me of some of the old timers I used to work with when I was younger.

Thanks, Bristolian!

In case anyone is nerdy enough to care (like I am), all of the walls on the right side of the Enterprise photo are still standing. The ship model is parked exactly in the driveway shown in the Google view.

https://i.imgur.com/2PCkMlY.jpgGSV

It's hard to get everything in one Google shot, so I had to swing the Google cam to the right.

So what kind of model making do you do, Bristolian? I did my share of Star Trek and Star Wars models, but mostly I liked making aircraft of World War II. I took it pretty seriously, I puttied all my seams with Squadron Green Putty, painted my models with a Paasche airbrush, etc, etc.

Bristolian Mar 15, 2018 5:07 AM

:previous:
Scott, I do it for a living. When I started I worked at a place that built prototypes for all kinds of consumer products and we worked on mostly toys. Now I work almost exclusively on toys doing prototyping and development.
I've never worked on television or movie props. It's kind of a parallel industry to what I do. A lot of the techniques and methods are the same though. That's what makes me curious about how the Enterprise was built.
It's obvious from your posts that you pay a lot of attention to detail. Like others have stated, your maps of the downtown hills were quite impressive.

ethereal_reality Mar 15, 2018 6:11 AM

mystery movie prop.
 
Calgrove Kennels, Newhall CA

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/oPZnka.jpg
KIMBERLEY RENEE / FLICKR

"These two....[ I only see one :shrug:] art deco-like columns are props from a movie set
and flank the entrance to Calgrove Kennels. You can view them as you drive the 5 Freeway in Newhall, CA."


Needless to say I found this quite intriguing.

I drove the google-mobile out to the location but wasn't able to find these 'art deco' columns at the entrance.

GSV VIEW
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/g9sYzA.jpg
GSV.

To the right of the gate there appears to be some kind of stone marker (or a fancy shmancy mailbox)....and on the left, what looks like.. a FOR SALE SIGN.


the GSV view above is from 'THE OLD ROAD' that runs parallel to the 5 Freeway
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/egvceb.jpg
google_earth


Then I came across this headline:

After more than 40 years of service, Newhall's Calgrove Kennels is closing. DAILY NEWS

So now I am afraid the art deco 'mystery' props might have been sold off.

The DAILY NEWS article mentions the kennel property was full of "A motley collection of Hollywood props and amusement park cast-offs."

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/CdPNFj.jpg
FLICKR

I think the missing columns were far and away the most tasteful items in the collection. (unless you have a thing for the HAMBURGLER :love:)


Does anyone who visits NLA know about this strange place?

I'd really like to know where the two deco columns ended up.
__

Scott Charles Mar 15, 2018 6:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8120563)
https://i.imgur.com/osfo980.gif

at first glance, i thought two bathing beauties had been killed hitting the deck before elva's successful dive.
I was quite relieved to find out that wasn't the case. [your gif is clear in it's message....i jump the gun more times than not]
(by the way, all your creative gifs are exceptional)

now we need to figure out the name of the 'ship' movie.

I doubt I'll ever find out anything about the ship movie, ER. First of all, 90% of all silent movies have been completely lost or destroyed. Second, even films that I can prove exist (because I have on-set photos with the movie's name on a clapboard) have no public record of existing. Add to this the fact that I don't know where the movie was shot, what kind of ship it was, what the subject matter of the film was, what year it was made, who starred in it, what company produced it, who directed it, etc, etc, etc, and it becomes essentially impossible to figure out what film it actually was.

While the Elva-dives-from-crow's-nest story may seem to resemble a tall tale, I must say that I do believe it entirely. My family had plenty of chances and dozens of years to come up with tall tales, yet this is the only hard-to-believe story they ever told, and there are no similarly "fantastic" stories for either grandpa Charlie or great-uncle Hubert.

Speaking of great-uncle Hubert, here he is selling an ice cream cone to Shemp Howard...

https://i.imgur.com/4hXs9Im.gif

... and here he is chasing Stan Laurel and getting whacked over the head by Oliver Hardy:

https://i.imgur.com/qR7yck0.gif

By the way, here's an old family photo: great-uncle Hubert is on the top left; grandpa Charlie is on the top right. Great-grandfather Budge is on the bottom left; and great-grandmother Emma is on the bottom right.

https://i.imgur.com/aaFIVzs.jpg

Great-grandmother Emma was the owner of the previously mentioned Auto Wheel Cafe.

https://i.imgur.com/hR22Gbb.jpg

Handsome Stranger Mar 15, 2018 6:33 AM

The 1947 Joan Crawford movie Possessed has previously been mentioned in these pages to spotlight the downtown locations that appear at the beginning of the movie.

Last night I watched a 1931 movie also called Possessed, also starring Crawford, and which also begins with scenes shot in downtown LA.

https://78.media.tumblr.com/f0f19b21...rtso1_1280.jpg

https://78.media.tumblr.com/4cad6bf1...rtso2_1280.jpg

https://78.media.tumblr.com/66de4244...rtso3_1280.jpg

https://78.media.tumblr.com/087eac72...rtso4_1280.jpg

https://78.media.tumblr.com/dc8977e1...rtso5_1280.jpg

[image source: Warner Bros Archive Collection]

In a lengthy tracking shot Joan first walks away from the huge tanks at the Gas Works. A cut or two later she suddenly turns right and is walking toward the tanks. That's Hollywood geography for you!

Can any of you sleuths tell me whether there actually were ramshackle houses this close to the gas works in 1931, or did MGM put them up just for a couple of shots? All the period photos I've seen near the Gas Works show a distinctly industrial neighborhood.

Scott Charles Mar 15, 2018 6:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bristolian (Post 8120580)
:previous:
Scott, I do it for a living. When I started I worked at a place that built prototypes for all kinds of consumer products and we worked on mostly toys. Now I work almost exclusively on toys doing prototyping and development.
I've never worked on television or movie props. It's kind of a parallel industry to what I do. A lot of the techniques and methods are the same though. That's what makes me curious about how the Enterprise was built.
It's obvious from your posts that you pay a lot of attention to detail. Like others have stated, your maps of the downtown hills were quite impressive.

Sounds like a fun job, Bristolian! At least for people like us, who enjoy building things. And I'm glad you like my maps! :)

You're probably lucky that you don't work for Hollywood - so much model work there has been replaced by CGI. As to Star Trek:

Quote:

The model's principal designer, Walter "Matt" Jefferies, worked with concepts provided by Star Trek's creator Gene Roddenberry. At first, Desilu Productions commissioned a rough 4-inch balsa and cardboard prototype. A 3-foot "pilot" model mostly of solid wood was then built by model-maker Richard C. Datin under subcontract to the Howard Anderson Company. Enlarging the plans for the 3-foot model resulted in the final 11-foot model shown here. The Anderson Company again turned to Datin who contracted it out to Production Model Shop of Burbank, California, with Datin supervising the construction while he did the detail work. (a gallery of good construction photos at this LINK)
https://i.imgur.com/5BLnUgQ.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/zhiqp6f.jpg

Photos courtesy of link above. Wikipedia also has some interesting information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_En...gin_and_design

CityBoyDoug Mar 15, 2018 12:10 PM

Cadillac Le Mans Number I show car at the Los Angeles custom car studio of George Barris.
Barris, performed a makeover of the original Le Mans for his client, Harry Karl, owner of Karl's Shoes.
[the photo above shows some of the unfortunate modification of the original Le Mans Cadillac]. The Barris
changes turned a beautiful 1953 GM show car into an ugly duckling.

Le Mans number one, the GM Motorama show car, is the car that went to shoe store mogul, Harry Karl. Paperwork in the archives of the GM Heritage Center says that Le Mans number one was shipped to the Los Angeles Branch for the account of Clarence Dixon Cadillac, Inc. in Hollywood, California on July 7, 1954. The paperwork noted, “For H. Earl” though whether or not this car had its title actually transferred to Harley Earl is not known. Probably, the car was sold to the owner of Clarence Dixon Cadillac and then Harry Karl bought it or perhaps it was transferred to Mr. Karl via the dealership. Either way it became his in 1954.

More information on this one of a kind car and its rather torturous career of only 8,000 odometer miles.
http://dwtauthor.blogspot.com/2011/0...and-their.html

HossC Mar 15, 2018 4:05 PM

:previous:

I think this is the back of the same 1953 Cadillac Le Mans, parked outside the Pan Pacific Auditorium.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...sCadillac1.jpg
www.customcarchronicle.com

To really appreciate the strange customizations (Kustomizations?), here's the car in color!

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...sCadillac2.jpg
www.facebook.com

CityBoyDoug Mar 15, 2018 4:19 PM

The perfect word Hoss:....Strange indeed. The redo of this car is almost repellent or nauseating...or even kinky..

odinthor Mar 15, 2018 6:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8117798)
"Francisco Lopez pulled wild onions near an oak tree on his Placerita Canyon Ranch and found gold nuggets caught in their roots."

lol, no doubt odinthor. I'd return from the trip with a trunk full of wild onions!


Here's an interesting bit of ephemera:

Walker's Camp was using the 1842 gold find as a marketing tool in the 1930s.

FRONT AND BACK ONLY
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/lwaOxF.jpg
SCVHISTORY

and this.....(about the brochure)

"In a promotional brochure published by 1930s Placerita landowner Frank Walker:
"The first anniversary [in 1843] of this gold discovery was celebrated by the erection of a chapel on the site of the discovery
and the chanting of a solemn high mass by three priests, two from San Fernando and one from Los Angeles,
six altar boys, the entire Mission choir, consisting of twenty neophytes and eight musicians.
Many prominent families of Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, San Buena Ventura and the surrounding country
and the Commissioners sent by Mexico to investigate the truth or falsity of the discovery, were present,
— a date in the history of our State was solemnized, which was to be forever after forgotten."


That's a surprise! I wonder what happened to the chapel? :shrug:

[...]

At your service e_r!: I suspect that the chapel they erected was some sort of temporary ramada (framework of lopped-off tree limbs covered over with brush or palm leaves), a sort of erection, er, construction frequently made use of in those days by the mission fathers. Fr. Zephyrin Engelhardt, very thorough historian of the missions and missionaries of Alta and Baja California, calls it a “bower”: “According to the account given by Mrs. Catalina Lopez, on the first anniversary of the discovery, March 9, 1843, in a bower surrounded by a great multitude of people, Father Blas Ordaz, O.F.M., in charge of San Fernando Mission, celebrated a High Mass, and the neophytes supplied the music as well as the singing” (Engelhardt, San Fernando Rey, 1927, p. 144).

But let’s go back a little further: “In the month of June, 1841, two vaqueros (herdsmen) of a neighboring ranch, while riding over the ranch of San Francisquito, dismounted from their horses by the side of a rivulet to give them a breathing spell, and seeing a bed of wild onions they engaged in gathering some of them. While so doing, one of them, by name Francisco Lopez, who had been present and saw the pebbles which Castillero had said was an indication of gold placers, noticed some of them here and said to his companion: ‘Look at this; there is gold here, for I heard Don Andrés Castillero say that there was gold to be found wherever these little stones exist’; and immediately scooping up a handful of the sand and gravel which had been loosened by pulling up the onions, he rubbed it with his other hand, and sure enough he found in his handful a grain of gold. On their return to Santa Barbara these men took with them a few dollars worth of gold which they had obtained from the gravel” (from A History of the Precious Metals, by Alexander Del Mar, 1902, p. 413).

But, no, we have to go back further. What’s this about one Andrés Castillero saying something?

“1841. In the early part of this year Don Andres Castillero, a native of Mexico, a man of scientific attainments and mineralogical knowledge, travelling from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara, saw and gathered up, near the rancho of Las Virgenes, some mineral specimens, which he exhibited in Santa Barbara, and said that generally, if not invariably, placer gold existed wherever this class of pebbles were found” (Del Mar, op. cit., p. 413).

No, no—can’t stop there. Who is this Andrés Castillero?

Well—Castillero actually lies behind several interesting and significant developments in California history, which I have cleverly hidden amidst the dross in the following notes: April, 1836, Capt. Castillero arrived in California with the choleric Governor Mariano Chico (memorable as the governor who wore green spectacles); 1836, in Alta California with Governors Chico and Gutierrez, not only a military man but also with some knowledge of medicine; November 23, 1836, landed at Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, with the rest of the exiled Gutierrez party; early 1837, secretary to Jose Caballero, comandante general of Baja California; May, 1837, directed to take a force north by the authorities in Baja California in order to dampen the spirit of insurrection in Alta California; June 12, 1837, at the Baja/Alta California frontier; June 14-15, 1837, at Mission San Luis Rey with his army; June 15, 1837, at San Luis Rey, attaching himself and his army to the San Diego Revolt army led by Portilla; June 19, 1837, arriving in L.A. with the joint army; June 22, 1837, to Mission San Fernando Rey with the army; June 27-July 2, 1837, mediating between the Norteño Alvarado/Castro interests and the Sureño Carrillo/Bandini interests, the final result being that, since both sides agreed to accept the new Mexican constitution, the revolt became a non-entity (only to be replaced by the Carrillo Revolt); July 17, 1837, at San Gabriel, leaving, perhaps the 18th, for San Diego with his army; after several weeks of campaigning on the frontier, to Santa Barbara; August 15, 1837, boarding the California at Santa Barbara, sailing for Acapulco with Nicanor Estrada, on a commission from Gov. Alvarado, arriving at the destination September 15; 1838, brought documents from the Mexican government granting amnesty to recent rebels, recognizing Alvarado as governor, and bringing a number of people appointments to various official positions, detractors calling these people Oficiales del Catarrillo (“catarrillo” playing on the name of Castillero, and referring to the catarrh), not much to the liking of said people; 1839, granted Santa Cruz Island (in 1837, he had proposed to the government that the island be used as a penal colony); 1845, fomenting dissension between Jose Castro and Pio Pico; in the Yankee era, Castillero had legal wrangles involving the famous New Almaden mine up in the Bay area; “He was an adventurer, who had come to the country with Governor Chico. Having a little smattering of medical knowledge, he found employment as an army physician; but without confining himself to regular business, he held himself ready for any new enterprise, and mixed in all the political agitations that were going on” (from “Juan Bautista Alvarado, Governor of California,”, in Overland Monthly, Vol. VI, p. 346, October 1885, by Theodore H. Hittell).

Anyone still awake? No? Mission accomplished!

sopas ej Mar 15, 2018 6:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 8120939)
The perfect word Hoss:....Strange indeed. The redo of this car is almost repellent or nauseating...or even kinky..

Yeah, the gold Dagmar bumpers really do make it somehow look kinky.

ethereal_reality Mar 15, 2018 7:09 PM

Dagmar, 'Ballin' the Jack', 1951

Video Link


Dagmar....bumpers....I'm lost. :shrug:
__




update:

You mean these things?

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...924/3NuBcP.jpg

;)

ethereal_reality Mar 15, 2018 7:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bristolian (Post 8120551)
I'm not a Trekkie at all but I do model making and fabrication


This is no USS Enterprise (that photograph was great! Bristolian), but, whatever it is, it somehow found it's way up to Calgrove Kennels in Newhall.
(the place I spoke about last night...with the 'motley' collection of studio prop & what-not)


https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/8...922/EUuHC1.jpg
Delenakatherine / flickr

Any sci-fi buffs recognize this thing?
__________


Come to think of it...it kind of reminds me of some of the vehicles that sat outside of a place on Cahuenga Blvd West in the 1980s.
(I forget the name of the business)

HossC Mar 15, 2018 9:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8120615)

Calgrove Kennels, Newhall CA

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/oPZnka.jpg
KIMBERLEY RENEE / FLICKR

"These two....[ I only see one :shrug:] art deco-like columns are props from a movie set
and flank the entrance to Calgrove Kennels. You can view them as you drive the 5 Freeway in Newhall, CA."


Needless to say I found this quite intriguing.

I drove the google-mobile out to the location but wasn't able to find these 'art deco' columns at the entrance.

The "art deco-like columns" were still there in 2011. The "Boneyard Express" and dinosaurs can also be seen through the fence if you turn to the left.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...veKennels1.jpg
GSV


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:38 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.