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jtown,man Apr 6, 2021 7:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 9239828)
From ABC7:

COVID-19 surges across multiple states as California numbers continue to drop

By JR Stone
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 8:38AM


SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- California has the best COVID-19 positivity rate in the country. But as this good news comes, there is also bad news as other states like Michigan are dealing with a surge of cases.

"There's almost a tale of two cases right now, how to prevent cases, to how to see cases rise and we definitely don't want to see the latter," says Dr. Alok Patel of ABC7's Vaccine Team. Patel is referring to masked crowds we've seen in San Francisco -- where the COVID-19 positivity rate is 1% -- and places where we've seen COVID-19 surges like Miami, Florida -- where there are unmasked crowds and a positivity rate of 10%.

"I won't get concerned as long as they don't come here," says Markeigh Ford of San Francisco.

Doctors that we talked with are concerned though, saying that the largest surges we're seeing across the country involve young people who have expanded their bubbles and now could be facing new variants.

"By in large, young individuals in this country are not vaccinated and I'm not just talking about those who are below the age of 16 who aren't approved. I'm also talking about those under the age of 30," says Patel.

Stanford's Dr. Grace Lee says it's a race against time to get the vaccine out there and better prepare everyone for any possible 4th surge in California.

"Until we can vaccinate the population that is continuing to have high rates of infection, which is really our young adult population, it's gonna be really hard to prevent the spread or transmission of the COVID-19 infection," says Dr. Lee.

Monday night, those we spoke with in San Francisco said they feel that those here in the Bay Area have been more cautious than other places and are therefore better prepared.

"Yes for sure, I mean people are more educated here and they take more precautions in general," said Tisha Dutta and Shuvhan Doel of San Francisco.

Doctors just hopeful that Californians keep their guard up as numbers continue to drop here but rise elsewhere.

Link: https://abc7news.com/covid-surge-in-...bers/10490051/

SO people in Michigan, New Jersey, and New York aren't wearing masks either?

Why is there an obsession with masks?

sopas ej Apr 6, 2021 7:57 PM

From CNN:

In Michigan's latest coronavirus surge, there's a new kind of patient

By Miguel Marquez, CNN

Updated 7:55 AM ET, Tue April 6, 2021


(CNN) - Michigan is in another coronavirus surge and hospitals are again on the front line, but this time they have a new type of patient: younger and healthier.

Fred Romankewiz was on his way to get vaccinated, but he didn't feel well so he canceled the appointment and got a Covid-19 test instead. Though he'd been inches from the coronavirus finish line, the 54-year-old construction materials salesman from Lansing now tested positive.

"What really is frustrating to me is it's been a year and what -- three months now, and I played it right to the tee. I mean, I did everything correct," said Romankewiz. "And then to have this happen."

Watching TV, responding to a steady stream of text messages and cracking jokes from his hospital bed in Lansing's Sparrow Hospital, Romankewiz said he feels upbeat about his prospects for a full recovery but that the virus laid him low.

"I felt like I went 10 rounds with Mike Tyson," he said. "I was absolutely physically exhausted. I mean, I felt like I had been beat up, I felt like I had been in a car accident. I mean, it was crazy."

Romankewiz, who lives a healthy life and has no underlying conditions, said he contracted the virus from his 19-year-old-son, Andy. His wife, Betsy, who is fully vaccinated, also got the virus but suffered minor symptoms.
Jim Dover, CEO and president of Sparrow Health System, a large health care provider in central Michigan, said two things are driving the current surge: pandemic fatigue and mutations in the coronavirus that have made it more contagious and possibly more deadly.

"This variant is more virulent, and so therefore more infectious, and so easier to catch," said Dover. "Second is everyone is tired of wearing masks, so you will go out and see a lack of social distancing, the lack of wearing masks. The virus is invisible and people did not know they're walking through a cloud of Covid, and next thing you know, they're infected."

Dangerous variant spreading throughout the state

Both the B.1.351 and highly contagious B.1.1.7 variants have been identified in Michigan, but the B.1.1.7 strain is now spreading throughout the community. The state health department has identified more than 1,200 instances of the B.1.1.7 variant. The actual number is likely much higher considering the difficulty in determining which variant is causing cases throughout the state -- the samples have to be sent to a state lab for time-consuming DNA analysis to determine the variant.

At Beaumont Hospital's Royal Oak, a facility of the largest health care provider in the Wolverine State, the prevalence of the B.1.1.7 variant is clear.
Dr. Justin Skrzynski is a Covid hospitalist -- a title that didn't exist a year ago -- which means he specializes in the care of Covid patients. He said they send out a small sample of some of their cases to the state for DNA analysis.
"Right now, the regular Covid test we do -- that's still just showing Covid (or) no Covid," Skrzynski said. "But we do send a lot of those out to the state and we are seeing something like 40% of our patients now (with) B.1.1.7."

Tina Catron, 44, is under Skrzynski's care at Beaumont Health's Royal Oak facility. The mother of two said she thinks her family became infected with coronavirus through her children's soccer league.

"We're not 100% sure," she said of how they all got it, "but we think from the soccer field, with the parents, even though we're all masked up. From the sidelines, everyone's yelling. And I think what happened is my husband was with my son, his soccer game. And he brought it home."

Fighting the virus on many fronts

Health officials in Michigan have indicated both schools and youth sports are possible vectors for the virus. Catron says her 9-year-old, Levi, and 7-year-old, Jesse, had no symptoms and her husband got very sick but wasn't hospitalized.

She said was shocked to be hospitalized. She's healthy, active and has no underlying conditions but required hospitalization after developing pneumonia.

"You feel like you're suffocating a little bit," she said, clearing her throat and still struggling to breathe.

At one point, Catron's oxygen levels dropped dangerously low to 82% -- far below the normal range of 95% to 100%.

Michigan -- whose Democratic governor, Gretchen Whitmer, experienced severe backlash from Republicans, business owners and others over her ongoing coronavirus restrictions -- is fighting the virus on several fronts. Vaccinations are rolling out, with about 600,000 Michiganders getting a shot every week; the economy is reopening, with some restrictions being lifted; and many are returning to pre-pandemic life with no masks or social distancing.

The daily hospital admission rate based on a seven-day rolling average for younger age groups in Michigan is up over the same averages during the massive autumn surge. For instance, the Michigan Health & Hospital Association reports that among those aged 30-39, there were 26 daily admissions based on a seven-day average during the fall and winter surge, while today there are 43 admissions in the same age bracket.

The 40-49 age bracket is seeing a similar rise, with 58 being admitted daily compared to 33 during the autumn surge. For those 60 and older, hospitalizations have declined sharply as vaccinations have risen.
The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says 35.2% of Michigan adults have received at least one vaccine dose and 21.5% have been fully vaccinated.

Health workers were 'thrown a curveball'

Dr. Lynda Misra, medical director of the Covid unit at Beaumont Health's Royal Oak facility, said the rise in cases has been sharp and they are unsure where they are in this current surge. Whatever it brings, she said, she and her staff will meet the challenge -- but the virus has proved resilient and tricky to fight.

"Each surge has brought different challenges," she said. "We felt very strong that we had this disease under attack, but then we get thrown a curveball."
The weight and strain of the ongoing pandemic is evident when speaking to health care workers.

Lindsay Muenchen, a registered nurse in the Covid unit at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, said she had thought the worst was behind them. "The day I came in and saw that our unit was full of Covid patients again, it was really difficult," she said. "I had tears in my eyes."

Dora Hoppes, also at Sparrow Hospital, has worked as a registered nurse for 22 years. She said the past year has been the hardest.

Her voice cracked and emotions rose at the first question of our brief interview. When asked why it's so hard to speak about the past year, she motioned down the hallway. "I just saw it yesterday," she said, fighting back tears. "I had a patient that passed away, so it's very fresh, every day."

The stress of being constantly surrounded by so much sickness and death is the most difficult part of a job she loves, she said. "I would like to come into work now and just take care of a person who is here because they need their gallbladder out."

CNN's Linh Tran and Frank Bivona contributed to this report.



Link: https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/05/us/mi...WYqPsZhmpljy7Q

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2021 8:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9240027)
SO people in Michigan, New Jersey, and New York aren't wearing masks either?

Why is there an obsession with masks?

Because it's such a simple, harmless, fairly in expensive and effective way to suppress viral transmission that can be done with no significant effects on the economy or the ability of people to interact. Indeed, if people wear masks its possible that economic activity and social interaction that might otherwise be dangerous can have acceptable risk.

If you want most businesses open, at least some fans in the stands for sports, concerts to be possible and in-person schooling, wear a mask during such activities and they can probably happen. No one in America is seriously talking these days about Europe-style lockdowns. They're just asking people to wear masks. What seems crazy and almost sociopathic is the unwillingness to do such a simple thing.

the urban politician Apr 6, 2021 8:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9240125)
Because it's such a simple, harmless, fairly in expensive and effective way to suppress viral transmission that can be done with no significant effects on the economy or the ability of people to interact. Indeed, if people wear masks its possible that economic activity and social interaction that might otherwise be dangerous can have acceptable risk.

If you want most businesses open, at least some fans in the stands for sports, concerts to be possible and in-person schooling, wear a mask during such activities and they can probably happen. No one in America is seriously talking these days about Europe-style lockdowns. They're just asking people to wear masks. What seems crazy and almost sociopathic is the unwillingness to do such a simple thing.

:tup:

You've got no argument here. I've been pro-mask since pretty much the beginning. The reluctance to wear masks has been our biggest problem in the US

sopas ej Apr 6, 2021 8:50 PM

From the Los Angeles Times:

California aims to fully reopen the economy June 15

By LUKE MONEY, TARYN LUNA
APRIL 6, 2021 11 AM PT


California is aiming to fully reopen its economy June 15 — the clearest end date eyed for restrictions that have besieged businesses and upended daily life throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

The date isn’t set in stone. And officials emphasize that getting to the point where California can widely reopen for the first time in more than a year will hinge on two factors: a sufficient vaccine supply to inoculate all those who are eligible and stable and low numbers of people hospitalized with the disease.

June 15 also won’t bring a full return to pre-pandemic life. Notably, California’s mask mandate will remain in place for the foreseeable future.

But officials expressed confidence that the state, through continued improvement in its coronavirus metrics and the steady rollout of vaccines, is now positioned to begin actively planning for what comes after COVID-19.

“With more than 20 million vaccines administered across the state, it is time to turn the page on our tier system and begin looking to fully reopen California’s economy,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a statement Tuesday. “We can now begin planning for our lives post-pandemic. We will need to remain vigilant, and continue the practices that got us here — wearing masks and getting vaccinated — but the light at the end of this tunnel has never been brighter.”

Should all go as planned, June 15 will see the official end of California’s current reopening roadmap, which sorts counties into one of four color-coded tiers based on three metrics: coronavirus case rates, adjusted based on the number of tests performed; the rate of positive test results; and a health-equity metric intended to ensure that the positive test rate in poorer communities is not significantly higher than the county’s overall figure.

“The entire state will move into this phase as a whole. This will not be county-by-county,” Dr. Mark Ghaly, California’s health and human services secretary, said in a briefing call with reporters.

In a statement, officials said those sectors included in the state’s reopening blueprint will be allowed to “return to usual operations in compliance with Cal/OSHA requirements and with common-sense public health policies in place, such as required masking, testing and with vaccinations encouraged. Large-scale indoor events, such as conventions, will be allowed to occur with testing or vaccination verification requirements.”

Ghaly emphasized that, “if we see any concerning rise in our hospitalizations, we will take the necessary precautions. But right now, we are hopeful in what we’re seeing as we continue to build on the 20 million vaccines already administered.”

A successful statewide reopening in June poses a major political upside for the governor, who faces a likely recall election in the fall.

Newsom’s chances of surviving a recall could be higher if Californians have resumed some form of pre-COVID-19 life when they cast their ballots. Mass vaccinations and the return of in-person education are critical to that sense of normalcy.

Newsom was the first governor in the nation to issue a stay-at-home order in the early days of the pandemic last year, an action widely cast as the right call to protect California’s fragile healthcare system.

The governor hasn’t received the same praise for his handling of reopenings.

Health experts have said Newsom lifted restrictions too quickly and didn’t reinstate them fast enough when case numbers grew, adding to COVID-19 surges in the summer and winter. Health and Human Services Secretary Ghaly, one of the state’s top health officials, has said he would have slowed the pace of change last summer if he could do it all again.

Rescinding restrictions and launching a sweeping reopening create news risks for Newsom. If the virus surges again or unexpected problems arise, the whiplash of the governor’s constantly changing rules could be fresher in the minds of voters, who may blame him at the polls.

Political experts say the more Californians think of the pandemic in the past tense, the more likely Newsom is to keep his seat.

The announcement of the targeted reopening date came the same day that California hit its goal of administering 4 million COVID-19 vaccine doses in its most vulnerable communities — a milestone not only in the ongoing struggle to more equitably give out the precious shots, but in the push to further reopen the state’s economy even ahead of June 15.

Hitting the target means the state will redraft the reopening roadmap to implement new criteria that will allow counties to more quickly relax some of the restrictions on businesses and public spaces.

The changes will, in effect, apply an orange coat to the Golden State.

The tiers outlined in California’s current reopening strategy go from purple, in which coronavirus transmission is considered widespread, and indoor operations are severely limited or suspended across a wide array of business sectors; to red, with fewer restrictions; to orange, with even fewer; and finally, yellow, in which most businesses can open indoors with modifications.

Before Tuesday, counties had to record fewer than 4.0 new cases per day per 100,000 people to move into the orange tier. With the 4-million dose target now achieved, the requirement has been loosened to under 6.0.

Moving into the orange tier has significant economic implications.

Counties can allow bars to reopen outdoors with some modifications, and bars also are no longer required to serve food.

Amusement parks can reopen at up to 25% capacity, and fan attendance is allowed at 33% capacity for outdoor sports and live performances.

Capacity restrictions can also be lifted in stores, although social distancing and other safety modifications still apply; houses of worship, museums, zoos and aquariums can raise their indoor capacity to 50% from 25%; restaurants and movie theaters can raise indoor capacity to 50% capacity or 200 people from 25% or 100 people (whichever is fewer); and indoor gyms and yoga studios can increase capacity to 25% from 10%.

Bowling alleys can reopen with modifications at 25% capacity. Card rooms and satellite wagering sites can also reopen indoors at 25% capacity.

Offices in nonessential industries can reopen, though the state says workers should still be encouraged to work remotely.

The state-set goal of administering first 2 million, then 4 million doses in targeted communities — namely, those in the lowest quartile of a socioeconomic measurement tool called the California Healthy Places Index — was only one aspect of a wider effort aimed at ensuring equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines.

California has for the last month earmarked 40% of its COVID-19 vaccine supply for residents in those disadvantaged areas, an allocation state officials said would not only help address inequities in the inoculation rollout, but make sure the shots are available to those most at risk from the pandemic.

To date, providers throughout California have doled out 20.3 million total COVID-19 vaccine doses, and 34.2% of residents have received at least one shot, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Roughly 18.1% of Californians are fully vaccinated at this point, meaning they’ve either received the single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine or both required doses of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines.

Nationwide, 32.4% of Americans have received at least one dose and 18.8% are fully vaccinated, CDC data show.

During the early phases of the vaccine rollout, California restricted access to the shots to those considered at highest risk of coronavirus infection, either because of their age, occupation or underlying health conditions.

That will change starting April 15, when anyone age 16 and over will be able to book appointments.

The state had widened vaccine eligibility last week to include everyone 50 and older.

President Biden had initially said states should make all adults eligible for COVID-19 vaccines by May 1. But he is expected to announce a more aggressive timeline Tuesday — setting a new deadline of April 19.

Link: https://www.latimes.com/california/s...conomy-june-15

jtown,man Apr 6, 2021 9:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9240125)
Because it's such a simple, harmless, fairly in expensive and effective way to suppress viral transmission that can be done with no significant effects on the economy or the ability of people to interact. Indeed, if people wear masks its possible that economic activity and social interaction that might otherwise be dangerous can have acceptable risk.

If you want most businesses open, at least some fans in the stands for sports, concerts to be possible and in-person schooling, wear a mask during such activities and they can probably happen. No one in America is seriously talking these days about Europe-style lockdowns. They're just asking people to wear masks. What seems crazy and almost sociopathic is the unwillingness to do such a simple thing.

The data doesn't support the argument that masks are important enough to impose on people though. I would be a sociopath if that were true, but real life data is showing its statically a non-mover.

I couldn't help but laugh seeing my breath billow out of my mask during cold winter days. Obviously my mask was doing nothing.

the urban politician Apr 6, 2021 9:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9240182)
The data doesn't support the argument that masks are important enough to impose on people though. I would be a sociopath if that were true, but real life data is showing its statically a non-mover.

I couldn't help but laugh seeing my breath billow out of my mask during cold winter days. Obviously my mask was doing nothing.

All you have to do is breathe out onto your hand without a mask, and then with a mask on, and you can obviously see that there is a profound difference in air flow.

Masks aren't full proof. But if they reduce viral innoculum then they've done their job

jtown,man Apr 6, 2021 9:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9240187)
All you have to do is breathe out onto your hand without a mask, and then with a mask on, and you can obviously see that there is a profound difference in air flow.

Masks aren't full proof. But if they reduce viral innoculum then they've done their job

I get that, but to what extent? Like am I 20% or 95% less likely to get covid wearing a mask? That's an important question.

All I know is that we went from 3457 deaths on Jan 26th to 808 deaths on April 5th. Masks had absolutely nothing to do with that nor does it show up when comparing relatively unmasked states to states that have a high proportion of masked residents.



I guess the fight against masking is that certain segments of the population act like you are evil for not wearing one, as if it means certain death for those around you and that its efficacy is in question.

I had a lady get off the sidewalk to continue her jog in a bike lane rather than walk on an extremely wide sidewalk today past me. It's laughable, really. But then again, it's scary. These are the exact types of people that would call me "anti-science" when they must have NEVER read anything about outdoor transmission.

sopas ej Apr 6, 2021 9:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9240187)
All you have to do is breathe out onto your hand without a mask, and then with a mask on, and you can obviously see that there is a profound difference in air flow.

Masks aren't full proof. But if they reduce viral innoculum then they've done their job

Right? And why risk it? Would you allow unmasked coughing people and unmasked joggers within a few feet of your 10-year old unmasked child outside?

SIGSEGV Apr 6, 2021 10:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9240195)
I get that, but to what extent? Like am I 20% or 95% less likely to get covid wearing a mask? That's an important question.

the main benefit is reduction in transmission.

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2021 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9240182)
The data doesn't support the argument that masks are important enough to impose on people though. I would be a sociopath if that were true, but real life data is showing its statically a non-mover.

I couldn't help but laugh seeing my breath billow out of my mask during cold winter days. Obviously my mask was doing nothing.

You'll have to quote and link that data and reference it to high quality masks like N95 or KN95s.

When your breath was billowing what were you wearing? We know gaters are pretty useless as are bandanas. Also, of course, blowing breathe is water vapor, not droplets or particles. Vapor will pass through any mask as it is supposed to, otherwise you couldn't breathe through it.

Personally, I've never worn anything but N95s and KN95s and those are what I think everybody should be wearing so show me the data on those that says they "aren't important enough". I've not heard a single virologist who would agree with that.

But I must repeat: Wearing a mask is a simple harmless thing that virtually every "expert" is saying we should do. Why are you being so stubborn about it? It is unseemly and clearly an ego trip for you. Even if you don't believe they work, it's something that society asks of you.

Waiting on that link that quality masks "aren't important enough" to bother you by asking you to wear one . . . .

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2021 11:45 PM

Quote:

California plans to lift virus restrictions in June if certain benchmarks are met.

Gov. Gavin Newsom of California announced on Tuesday that the state would lift all its coronavirus restrictions on June 15 as long as new infections remained low and stable.

. . . over 30 million people will have been vaccinated with at least one dose by the end of the calendar month . . . .

The move in June will allow Californians to return to restaurants, bars, movie theaters, houses of worship and concerts without strict capacity limits for the first time in more than a year . . . .
https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/04...a-reopen-covid

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2021 11:50 PM

Quote:

Nearly half of new US virus infections are in just 5 states
RUSS BYNUM and MICHELLE R. SMITH
Associated Press
April 6, 2021
Updated: April 6, 2021 3:30 p.m.

Nearly half of new coronavirus infections nationwide are in just five states — a situation that is putting pressure on the federal government to consider changing how it distributes vaccines by sending more doses to hot spots.

New York, Michigan, Florida, Pennsylvania and New Jersey together reported 44% of the nation's new COVID-19 infections, or nearly 197,500 new cases, in the latest available seven-day period, according to state health agency data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. Total U.S. infections during the same week numbered more than 452,000 . . . .

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/art...n-16081079.php

jtown,man Apr 6, 2021 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9240252)
You'll have to quote and link that data and reference it to high quality masks like N95 or KN95s.

When your breath was billowing what were you wearing? We know gaters are pretty useless as are bandanas. Also, of course, blowing breathe is water vapor, not droplets or particles. Vapor will pass through any mask as it is supposed to, otherwise you couldn't breathe through it.

Personally, I've never worn anything but N95s and KN95s and those are what I think everybody should be wearing so show me the data on those that says they "aren't important enough". I've not heard a single virologist who would agree with that.

But I must repeat: Wearing a mask is a simple harmless thing that virtually every "expert" is saying we should do. Why are you being so stubborn about it? It is unseemly and clearly an ego trip for you. Even if you don't believe they work, it's something that society asks of you.

Waiting on that link that quality masks "aren't important enough" to bother you by asking you to wear one . . . .

Almost no one has those high-quality masks though. Even CNN admitted the masks you usually see out there aren't doing anything a few weeks ago.

I never said those masks arent useful, those aren't the requirements. Any mask will do, hence it is a political point, not a medical move.

jtown,man Apr 6, 2021 11:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 9240203)
Right? And why risk it? Would you allow unmasked coughing people and unmasked joggers within a few feet of your 10-year old unmasked child outside?

First, coughing people don't have leprosy. Second, yes.

An unmasked jogger pretty much has a 0% chance of infecting your kid.

We are a year into this and people still are lying or misrepresenting how outside transmission works.

I would bet my next paycheck that less than 5 people have been infected from a jogger running by them. It's a non-issue but talked about by people that fear everything without evidence.

JManc Apr 7, 2021 12:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9240130)
:tup:

You've got no argument here. I've been pro-mask since pretty much the beginning. The reluctance to wear masks has been our biggest problem in the US

Everyone should absolutely wear one indoors, especially if they haven't been fully vaccinated yet but outside? Nah. I have contractors here at my house and they have been fully vaccinated as have I. Told them they didn't have to wear their masks.

Camelback Apr 7, 2021 3:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 9239958)
^
There’s that ridiculous word surge again. Are deaths “surging”? No they aren’t. So this increase in covid doesn’t matter because younger people get a mild cold or nothing at all. Of course there are the outlier extremely rare cases when a young person dies or gets very sick but those are outliers. This continued fear mongering by the media is absolutely insane. Nearly all of the elderly and those at risk are vaccinated; I’m vaccinated and I’m only 33. Everyone is starting to get vaccinated. This continued fear is beyond nutso and continued wearing of masks is nuts.

For sure.

The virus is on the way out. The vaccines are effective against the variants. A great example of what is to come has already occurred in Israel. They have administered 114 shots per 100 people in the country. Their case count has dropped from over 10,000 people per day in around January 15th to 300 new cases today.

The US has administered 167 million shots or about 50 shots per 100 people. A mini spike in a few states is nothing to be fearful of because at this point the at risk population has received or will receive the vaccine really soon.

Canada 18 shots per 100
Mexico 7.4 shots per 100
France 19 shots per 100
Spain 19 shots per 100
Germany 17 shots per 100
Brazil 10 shots per 100
India 6.1 shots per 100
Australia 3.4 shots per 100
Japan 0.9 shots per 100
South Korea 2 shots per 100

10023 Apr 7, 2021 4:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9240125)
Because it's such a simple, harmless, fairly in expensive and effective way to suppress viral transmission that can be done with no significant effects on the economy or the ability of people to interact. Indeed, if people wear masks its possible that economic activity and social interaction that might otherwise be dangerous can have acceptable risk.

If you want most businesses open, at least some fans in the stands for sports, concerts to be possible and in-person schooling, wear a mask during such activities and they can probably happen. No one in America is seriously talking these days about Europe-style lockdowns. They're just asking people to wear masks. What seems crazy and almost sociopathic is the unwillingness to do such a simple thing.

None of these things are enjoyable as long as masks are required, just tolerable. I wear a mask in the gym as required, but I’m there to maintain/improve fitness, not to have fun. I’m not doing anything like going to a concert or a basketball game as long as a mask needs to be worn. At least at a restaurant you take it off once you reach your table.

Camelback Apr 7, 2021 4:29 AM

I forgot to post that 55% of the Israeli population is fully vaccinated. They are very close to that magic herd immunity percentage.

The percentage of population that has been fully vaccinated in the US is 19%, vaccinated 32%.


UK: 8.2%
Canada: 1.9%
German: 5.2%
France: 4.6%
Spain: 6.1%
Italy: 5.8%
Brazil: 2.3%
Mexico: 0.9%
India: 0.8%
Japan: 0.2%
South Africa: 0.5%

photoLith Apr 7, 2021 4:31 AM

^^
Me and my gf have been avoiding things that require the wearing of masks. For example, we went to the Cleveland art museum about a month ago but only stayed about 2 hours because you’re required to wear a stupid mask the whole time, even though nobody was hardly there. Wearing a mask just sucks all of the humanity and joy out of doing things socially. It’s not normal to not see people’s faces. But I’m afraid that democrat run cities and states will mandate the wearing of masks for political points for freaking ever because they want to show everyone how much better and holier than thou they are than the republicans.


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