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Stormer Oct 4, 2017 2:42 PM

The tax changes are a very big deal, especially for professionals and highly successful family businesses. If you don't mind losing your doctor to the States or having far fewer great family businesses, then sure its no big deal.

one_brick_at_a_time Oct 4, 2017 3:56 PM

Are any businesses in the downtown allowed to do the sidewalk patio addition? Would the city allow any permanent concrete patio portions built like at Ohanlons? Looking at the new Starbucks on 11th, would be nice to actually have some sizeable patio space.

Nathan Oct 4, 2017 4:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by one_brick_at_a_time (Post 7942145)
Are any businesses in the downtown allowed to do the sidewalk patio addition? Would the city allow any permanent concrete patio portions built like at Ohanlons? Looking at the new Starbucks on 11th, would be nice to actually have some sizeable patio space.

That one might be unlikely as it's a main bus route. The Capitol basically has a permanent built out patio in the couple parking lanes outside the building.

Stormer Oct 4, 2017 4:34 PM

I believe this is the City policy:

http://www.regina.ca/opencms/export/...d-graphics.pdf

O'Hanlon's was quite unique as the City actually sold the sidewalk to the building owner.

djforsberg Oct 4, 2017 9:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7942045)
The tax changes are a very big deal, especially for professionals and highly successful family businesses. If you don't mind losing your doctor to the States or having far fewer great family businesses, then sure its no big deal.

That's some pretty rich fear-mongering you're doing there. There are plenty of reasons to prefer Canada over America besides the ability to make use of tax loopholes. The state of their health care system is a mess right now, for instance. Many people have families and other roots here as well and changes to the tax code won't be enough for most people to move to another country to escape them. If that's all they cared about, well good riddance than. Someone else will eventually come in and take their place anyways, if demand for their product or service remains.

Stormer Oct 4, 2017 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djforsberg (Post 7942649)
That's some pretty rich fear-mongering you're doing there. There are plenty of reasons to prefer Canada over America besides the ability to make use of tax loopholes. The state of their health care system is a mess right now, for instance. Many people have families and other roots here as well and changes to the tax code won't be enough for most people to move to another country to escape them. If that's all they cared about, well good riddance than. Someone else will eventually come in and take their place anyways, if demand for their product or service remains.

So if our most skilled an successful people choose to move because their after tax income will be substantially more elsewhere (especially if the U.S. cuts taxes) then we should just say "good riddance"?

BrutallyDishonest2 Oct 5, 2017 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7942661)
So if our most skilled an successful people choose to move because their after tax income will be substantially more elsewhere (especially if the U.S. cuts taxes) then we should just say "good riddance"?

Indeed, I do say good riddance to any doctors who, being told they will be taxed at the same rate as everyone else, decide to leave to the states.

It's okay though, they'll just go down south, open an S-Corp and realize it's a bloody flow through entity and they can't hold passive income or sprinkle either. Because that's not what corporations are designed for. Crazy!

jigglysquishy Oct 5, 2017 12:48 AM

Granted, I'm in my late 20s, but all the doctors in my social circle are NDPers. Engineers and financial folks? For sure right wing, but every doctor I know is in it to save people.

BrutallyDishonest2 Oct 5, 2017 12:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jigglysquishy (Post 7942802)
Granted, I'm in my late 20s, but all the doctors in my social circle are NDPers. Engineers and financial folks? For sure right wing, but every doctor I know is in it to save people.

There are exceptions of course but most doctors in Canada have a moral objection to the for-profit system of the US.

TechnicalRecession Oct 5, 2017 1:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7942661)
So if our most skilled an successful people choose to move because their after tax income will be substantially more elsewhere (especially if the U.S. cuts taxes) then we should just say "good riddance"?

I am not sure I understand the argument. It sounds like you are saying the most successful people are going to move because they will no longer be able to take advantage of tax loopholes, and that the country would be drained of our smartest and brightest. That argument in my opinion does not fly. Small business taxes are not overly burdensome to begin with, 12.5% I believe. The rules should be clear as to what is a valid deduction against income is and what is not valid. The proposals are making some changes to ensure abuse of that is reduced or eliminated. If people are going to move for that reason then that's a poor reason to oppose the changes.

Stormer Oct 5, 2017 2:23 PM

What I am saying if we have uncompetetively high taxes, some skilled and high tax paying people will make different choices. Not all obviously. The last time the dollar was low and taxes on high income earners were above 50% my personal family doctor moved to Louisiana and never returned. I have talked to other people who pay tax at the highest rates and some are looking at moving or retiring or investing elsewhere.

Many potential entrepreneurs, farmers and professionals may just choose to seek cushy government jobs rather than take risks. We can't all work for the government.

Imposing $3 Billion in tax changes will have consequences. I disagree that this is just leveling the playing field. I actually support closing true loopholes, but not punitive changes.

BrutallyDishonest2 Oct 5, 2017 7:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7943230)
I actually support closing true loopholes, but not punitive changes.

Then you actually have to identify any part of the proposals that do that.

djforsberg Oct 5, 2017 8:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7943230)
What I am saying if we have uncompetetively high taxes, some skilled and high tax paying people will make different choices. Not all obviously. The last time the dollar was low and taxes on high income earners were above 50% my personal family doctor moved to Louisiana and never returned. I have talked to other people who pay tax at the highest rates and some are looking at moving or retiring or investing elsewhere.

Many potential entrepreneurs, farmers and professionals may just choose to seek cushy government jobs rather than take risks. We can't all work for the government.

Imposing $3 Billion in tax changes will have consequences. I disagree that this is just leveling the playing field. I actually support closing true loopholes, but not punitive changes.

I don't think it will result in a significant amount of brain drain. Just like a rising minimum wage results in a small amount of job losses, the long term benefits to society as a whole with these kind of changes will more than outweigh the short term costs. Its about time government thinks this way instead of only thinking short-term.

As an aside, I'm an engineer/software developer and am quite progressive. I've actually started to lean more left as I get older, which I hear isn't typical of men. The more I learn about history and current events, the more I fear capitalism (and economic inequality) is reaching a point of unsustainability, which necessitates these kind of rational discussions to try and reign it back a bit before it collapses on its own.

Stormer Oct 5, 2017 9:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrutallyDishonest2 (Post 7943623)
Then you actually have to identify any part of the proposals that do that.

There are several examples. This editorial form a left wing newspaper addresses some.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/comm...-tax-plan.html

BrutallyDishonest2 Oct 6, 2017 1:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7943803)
There are several examples. This editorial form a left wing newspaper addresses some.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/comm...-tax-plan.html

That's not a left wing argument. That's the standard, outrage machine Chamber of Commerce, low-level argument.

His argument is primarily: income sprinkling is good and passive income is good.

The only useful contribution is some comments on clarification of rules.

TechnicalRecession Oct 6, 2017 2:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7943803)
There are several examples. This editorial form a left wing newspaper addresses some.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/comm...-tax-plan.html

The problem I have with these articles is they are based on speculation of what the impact will be. Yes some businesses will have to pay more tax due to the closed loopholes but well run businesses will adapt and survive and I suspect very few will close up shop and move to another jurisdiction because of these kinds of change. I think it is just greed in a lot of cases that is driving the reaction, my business makes this much today but because it will make less in the future I'm outraged, kind of thing.

And I am not saying these things because I am a raving left wing socialist. I'm a small business owner myself and had some concern when this first came up, but when I researched the potential impact it wasn't that big of a deal. Mainly because I am not using the loopholes. Most of the other small business owners who take the time to understand the impact on them have come to the same conclusion. The ones who are vehemently opposed to any kind of tax increase are the ones raving about it.

Stormer Oct 6, 2017 6:41 PM

Whoo Hooo!

The rumours are true! We are thrilled to announce that Grassroots Restaurant Group will be opening a new restaurant in Regina early summer of 2018. We are excited to open the restaurant in the historical Canada Life Assurance Building located on 11th Avenue. We look forward to providing the city of Regina a great dining experience and being a part of the already growing culture and food scene of Regina.
You don’t have to wait to experience our Grassroots Restaurant Group con...cepts as we’ll be hosting 3 pop up dinners in our new location featuring Ayden Kitchen and Bar, Little Grouse on the Prairie, and our newest venture Sticks and Stones.
Please see links below for ticketing details and information. We look forward to servicing you Regina!
https://www.picatic.com/AydenInRegina
https://www.picatic.com/LittleGrouseInRegina
https://www.picatic.com/SticksAndStonesInRegina

See More

https://external.fyxe1-1.fna.fbcdn.n...CJe0il41EUsmwd

https://www.facebook.com/aydenkitchenbar/

Drofmab Oct 7, 2017 8:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stormer (Post 7942196)
I believe this is the City policy:

http://www.regina.ca/opencms/export/...d-graphics.pdf

O'Hanlon's was quite unique as the City actually sold the sidewalk to the building owner.

I’ve mentioned before that I’d love to see a model where downtown property owners can buy (long term lease) the sidewalk adjacent to their buildings from the City (with condition that public access be maintained, obviously). Many other cities either sell/lease sidewalks to property owners & leave it to the private owners to maintain the sidewalks (including replacement when it comes to that...) often, it seems owners view this as a branding opportunity... especially when building new towers/structures.

The sidewalks downtown are in brutal shape... I can’t believe the City’s made no effort (other than SW corner of 12th & Hamilton a few year back) to address any downtown sidewalks in 7-8years. They are uniformly an obstacle course of tripping hazards - loose paving stones, large chunks of concrete, random large holes, bolts sticking out, metal edging protruding at tire-slashing angles, metal plates with curled edges, etc. Since the City seems to have given up, why not offer them up to DT businesses... they have a vested interest in seeing these surfaces maintained. Restaurants might be more willing to invest in patio like Ohans & Cap, if they had more control/ownership over the sidewalk.

djforsberg Oct 9, 2017 2:09 PM

Robins on Broad St near 1st Ave is closed. Heard they didn’t want to renew the lease. Any ideas of what will replace it? Timmies or even McDonalds is my guess.

BrutallyDishonest2 Oct 9, 2017 4:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djforsberg (Post 7946556)
Robins on Broad St near 1st Ave is closed. Heard they didn’t want to renew the lease. Any ideas of what will replace it? Timmies or even McDonalds is my guess.

I thought I heard that Taylor's was just going to take it over.


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