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chris08876 Apr 8, 2019 9:17 PM

The fight over exemptions will determine the fate of NYC’s congestion pricing

Quote:

With the passage of the state budget and the long-awaited and hard-fought approval of congestion pricing for Manhattan, New Yorkers worn down by endless subway delays and clogged city streets may see some light at the end of the proverbial tunnel. Congestion pricing, after all, has been promised as the silver bullet that will fix the subway and free Manhattan from the endless sea of cars that clog streets, crowding out pedestrians and polluting our air.

Advocates fighting for a traffic pricing plan have promised the world. A fee for cars entering Manhattan will clear the borough of crippling congestion while guaranteeing funding for Andy Byford’s comprehensive Fast Forward plan to fix New York City’s subways and buses. The dollars will unlock billions in capital spending, and limiting traffic will clear up the city’s air at a time when the catastrophic global impact of constant carbon emissions could not be more clear. (Or so the argument goes.)

But passing congestion pricing was just the first battle in a longer war, and for congestion pricing to be a success—for it to solve the problems it is supposed to solve—the next 21 months will be key as the MTA’s new Traffic Mobility Review Board develops the details of the plan, including any exemptions for those who drive into Manhattan but do not have to pay the fee. Congestion pricing will live or die by these carve-outs—and the board must ignore any political drum-beating related to them.

As I wrote in these pages last summer, congestion pricing is a progressive solution for New York City’s transit funding woes. Drivers in the city are wealthier than transit riders, and imposing a fee on them for access to limited road space to fund transit—whose benefits are enjoyed by millions in NYC—is the very definition of a progressive charging plan. But the benefits will take a few years to materialize. Fixing the subways—installing modern signal systems so that more trains can run through 100-year-old tunnels with fewer delays—is a multi-year (or multi-decade) fix, while congestion pricing will become a reality within the next two years. To successfully introduce congestion pricing, the MTA will roll out transit upgrades before the fee goes into effect, including more bus service and bus lanes, but in the near-term, drivers will face a new tax while high-capacity transit upgrades will be years away. And they won’t be happy.

As a rule, popularity for congestion pricing hits a valley in the period between approval and implementation as the narratives focus on fees rather than results. In recent polls, congestion pricing is already under water by 13 percentage points, and politicians may try to drive up approval numbers by kowtowing to groups seeking exemptions. But for New York City to experience the benefits of congestion pricing, politicians will have to provide cover for an initially unpopular plan.

[...]
==================
https://ny.curbed.com/2019/4/8/18299...lan-exemptions

Busy Bee Apr 8, 2019 11:21 PM

What's there to study? The connection was foreseen and accomidated for over 80 years ago! It's probably the most obvious needed subway extention on planet earth:

MTA to study Utica Ave subway extension, again

mrnyc Apr 17, 2019 12:02 PM

saving $$$ on second avenue subway phase two:


https://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs...roject-forward

k1052 Apr 17, 2019 6:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8533707)
The fight over exemptions will determine the fate of NYC’s congestion pricing


==================
https://ny.curbed.com/2019/4/8/18299...lan-exemptions

The way things look headed there are going there will be so many rebates and carve outs that I'd be shocked if congestion pricing generates half the anticipated revenue or a fraction of the hoped for congestion relief. We are unable to do even the simplest things because we absolutely must provide drivers with massive advantages at all times which can't be allowed to be reduced and let transit riders get the crumbs as usual. There is a colossal lack of political will.

k1052 Apr 24, 2019 7:00 PM

Reports starting to surface that traffic from NJ will be exempt from congestion pricing. Why do it at all since the governor is going to basically exempt all existing traffic by the time this is done and little revenue will be generated?

What a total fuck up.

streetscaper Apr 24, 2019 8:07 PM

^^ from the very beginning they said they would give discounts to NJ tunnels riders commensurate to the amount they currently pay for the tunnels.

I think this is the fair way to go. NJ residents shouldn't have to pay $15 to take the tunnel and then another $12-$14 when they exit the tunnel and into Manhattan


Quote:

About 115,000 people drive from New Jersey into Manhattan below 60th Street every weekday — about 13 percent of the 880,000 people who drive into the congestion zone, according to a 2017 count by the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/16/n...sultPosition=1

k1052 Apr 24, 2019 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by streetscaper (Post 8551110)
^^ from the very beginning they said they would give discounts to NJ tunnels riders commensurate to the amount they currently pay for the tunnels.

I think this is the fair way to go. NJ residents shouldn't have to pay $15 to take the tunnel and then another $12-$14 when they exit the tunnel and into Manhattan



https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/16/n...sultPosition=1

The MTA chair has now said that he doesn't know what agreement the NJ Gov is referring to and basically that there isn't one.

As long as he Hudson crossing charges float on demand I can live with it I guess. The demand charge should not be capped however.

As far as fairness is NJ not going to toll NYC drivers on their highways?

mrnyc Apr 29, 2019 2:59 PM

L train gateway?


Bury the Gateway plan: The L train method is the proven way to repair the Hudson tubes

By DAILY NEWS EDITORIAL BOARD
| NEW YORK DAILY NEWS |
APR 29, 2019 | 4:05 AM

Amtrak’s $30 billion Gateway boondoggle, centered around repairing the Superstorm Sandy-damaged Hudson tubes by building new ones, died Friday night with the start of the repairs of the L train’s Sandy-damaged East River tubes.

The MTA was planning to close the L tubes for 15 months to rip out and replace the concrete bench walls. Instead, the bench walls will no longer house power and communication cables, those will be affixed to open racks on the sides of the tube, allowing much easier access.

The Gateway gang says that they will look at cable racking, meaning the repairs won’t have to wait a decade for a new tunnel. Not good enough. In February 2018, they submitted an environmental impact statement to the feds for approval. Federal law mandates that all alternatives must be formally evaluated, but although the draft runs 1,787 pages, it never mentions racking, although it does discuss a far-out idea for a new Hudson rail bridge above Manhattan and even a new rail tunnel with bicycle lanes.

The Port Authority, as the sponsor, must withdraw the submission until racking can be rigorously reviewed and made the preferred method. The feds should also reject it for the same reason.


more:
https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/...shu-story.html

M II A II R II K Apr 30, 2019 9:24 PM

Four Lessons for 14th Street From Toronto’s Transit-First King Street

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2019/04/...t-king-street/

Quote:

.....

- City officials are saying their “busway” plan for 14th Street was inspired by the success of a similar project on Toronto’s King Street. But New York ain’t Canada. In Toronto, city officials (and the city’s then-transit boss Andy Byford) saw the same problem that New York is now confronting: A key east-west artery and transit route was mired in congestion that was causing public transit to crawl and ridership to plummet. — So Toronto went bold, banning cars and trucks from the byway, except for quick deliveries. All delivery vehicles were required to make the next legal turn a solution that clear the congested roadway for transit (in this case a streetcar).

- Where Toronto put dedicated loading zones, taxi stands, and 18 pedestrian plazas along its route, New York will use extra space for lanes with legal 30-minute parking a near-guarantee of double-parking in a city already rife with scofflaw drivers. — And New York’s Department of Transportation will allow trucks to share the roadway with buses, a concession to West Village residents who were concerned that trucks would use more residential roads to get across town. — Select Bus Service and the accompanying transit priority restrictions won’t launch on 14th Street until June or so.

- New York officials caved to organized opposition on Manhattan’s West Side by allowing trucks to share an already limited roadway with buses. Streetsblog asked DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg about that on Wednesday, when the plan was first revealed. — “[On] King Street you had a pretty big commercial corridor and then a couple of somewhat large commercial corridors on the adjoining streets,” Trottenberg said. “Here, particularly over in the West Village, there was a lot of concern and we didn’t want to discount it that trucks would go … onto smaller more residential streets.”

- On King Street, for-hire vehicles are only permitted between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. — and that’s simply too much access even in a city with parallel commercial streets: On Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, streetcar trip times are actually 30 percent longer — an ominous sign for NYC’s current plan to allow for-hire vehicles at all times. — New York will allow cabs all day and night albeit for dropoffs and pickups only. Not even Trottenberg is certain that can work. “We’ve done a lot of traffic modeling and the good news is, there isn’t a lot of pickup and drop-off activity,” Trottenberg claimed. “We have looked at taxi data and other things.”

.....



https://i2.wp.com/nyc.streetsblog.or...pg?w=800&ssl=1

aaron38 May 1, 2019 2:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8533707)
The fight over exemptions will determine the fate of NYC’s congestion pricing
Congestion pricing, after all, has been promised as the silver bullet that will fix the subway and free Manhattan from the endless sea of cars that clog streets, crowding out pedestrians and polluting our air.

Advocates fighting for a traffic pricing plan have promised the world. A fee for cars entering Manhattan will clear the borough of crippling congestion while guaranteeing funding for Andy Byford’s comprehensive Fast Forward plan to fix New York City’s subways and buses. The dollars will unlock billions in capital spending, and limiting traffic will clear up the city’s air

==================
https://ny.curbed.com/2019/4/8/18299...lan-exemptions

It doesn't work that way. Congestion pricing can't raise billions and rid the city of cars at the same time. No more than cigarette taxes can fund healthcare while also ending smoking.
Behavior will quickly fall to one side or the other. Either the city will be full of the cars of the wealthy who continue to drive because they can. The wealthy will probably drive more as their trip times improve. Everyone else is priced out and you get inequality protests.
Or everyone abandons their cars and there's no new revenue.

Nouvellecosse May 1, 2019 4:13 PM

The purpose of congestion pricing isn't to rid the city of cars, it's to rid the city of congestion. There will still be a huge number of vehicles, including cars, moving freely and efficiently through the city.

In other words, limit the number of cars based on the amount that people are willing to pay (determined by the laws of supply and demand) rather than limit the number of cars based on the amount of congestion people are willing to tolerate which is what currently happens in most major cities. In most cities there is a huge amount of latent demand for road space at peak times so it's impractical to expand the road network enough to keep it moving smoothly and as a result everyone using the road (including businesses and people of all income levels) is having their time and money wasted by congestion. In other words, there is already a congestion price because congestion is very expensive. The difference is that congestion pricing is a way to limit road use in a managed way by routing that cost into something productive rather than having it wasted in terms of productive time and fuel being basically evaporated.

pico44 May 4, 2019 12:25 PM

:previous:


Well said. And I don't want to hear about ANY exceptions except for emergency/disability services. I know the cops are already whining but that needs to be shut down immediately

chris08876 May 12, 2019 1:52 PM

2nd span u/c. Kosciuszko Bridge replacement.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...8070135e_k.jpg
Governor Cuomo Announces Second Span of New Kosciuszko Bridge to Open in September 2019 - Four Years Ahead of Schedule and On Budget by governorandrewcuomo, on Flickr

mrnyc May 13, 2019 4:12 PM

customers can start to use omny, the new mta tap card system, at a handful of stations starting the end of this month.

omny will eventually replace the metrocard:




TRANSIT

How to use OMNY, the MetroCard replacement coming to some subway lines, buses
The MTA's new tap-to-pay system will launch on May 31 at 16 subway stations and on Staten Island buses.

By Lauren Cook

Updated May 10, 2019 8:23 AM


https://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/..._768/image.jpg



Spring is a time for new beginnings, and for the MTA that means rolling out a new way to enter the subway.

On May 31, the MTA will launch OMNY, its new tap-to-pay system that will eventually replace the swipe, swipe, swipe of the MetroCard.

In an attempt to control the chaos likely to occur if the MetroCard was tossed out overnight, the MTA is rolling out the new system in phases, starting with 16 subway stations on the 4, 5 and 6 lines in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The new technology will also be available on Staten Island buses at the same time.



more:
https://www.amny.com/transit/how-doe...ork-1.30857529

mrnyc May 13, 2019 4:18 PM

some good news --- as advertized, the ato/cbtc system upgrades are improving service on the L and 7 trains:


TRANSIT

MTA completes 7 line's Automatic Train Operation upgrade in Queens

The 7 in Queens is the second line to be upgraded with ATO, after the L train. All other lines rely on operators to control a train's acceleration, cruising speed and braking.


more:
https://www.amny.com/transit/subway-...ain-1.30860424

M II A II R II K May 13, 2019 7:25 PM

Video Link

Dale May 17, 2019 7:54 PM

Is any tangible progress being made on Fast Forward ?

k1052 May 17, 2019 8:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dale (Post 8576756)
Is any tangible progress being made on Fast Forward ?

From what I've read, yes. On time statistics have improved due to repairs (especially signaling), removal of old speed restrictions, and elimination/updates to signal timers. The cutover to CBTC on the 7 has dramatically improved on time performance even though there are some teething issues with automatic operation. They still have a long way to go and rush period dispatching appears to be a continuing problem.

Dale May 17, 2019 8:19 PM

Thanks for the update! Also, are the new cars still on pace ?

https://www.amny.com/transit/new-subway-cars-1.26287915

k1052 May 17, 2019 8:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dale (Post 8576794)
Thanks for the update! Also, are the new cars still on pace ?

https://www.amny.com/transit/new-subway-cars-1.26287915

As far as I know however given how these procurements go I would expect a delay of some sort once they start getting them and testing. I think there were fewer problems with the Kawasaki cars (where the next order is coming from) than the problematic Bombardier R179s so hopefully it's mostly on schedule.


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