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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

hauntedheadnc Sep 3, 2021 2:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Camelback (Post 9386000)
Same.

Face coverings don't actually stop the spread of a virus. If they did, then this pandemic would've ended in the spring of 2020.

There's a reason that those dealing with Covid, aren't wearing a cheap face covering, because they would all get sick if they did. Instead they're wearing an N95 mask, gloves, usually eye goggles, and a gown.

Face coverings and cheapie masks increase the amount of times you touch your face, constantly adjusting it as you move around, talk to people.

Touching your face will get you sick.

You keep repeating that falsehood, and the rest of us keep having to post the facts to refute you:

Do face masks work? Here are 49 scientific studies that explain why they do

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 2:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9385851)
If your job or career would be negatively impacted by a positive Covid test, then that is very much an issue that needs to be sorted out with your employer because that isn’t right either.

If you can’t live your life because you’re afraid about catching a common (but now generally harmless) disease that would force you to take sick days, then the balance between work and life is really off.

I'd just, very reasonably, be required to work from home for 14 days, which would be pretty annoying/disruptive for me (I don't think you'd like it either), though of course my job wouldn't be in jeopardy (we also don't have "sick" days or "vacation" days, we are trusted to manage our own time...). Others in my research group may also be required to if they are judged to be close contacts. I'm not sure why you think I can't "live my life" because I eat outdoors at restaurants? :???:

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 2:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9385985)
Driving is EXTREMELY dangerous were your exact words.

Extremely

So every time anyone gets in a car to get groceries, they are doing something extremely dangerous.. Just want to make sure we have you on the record saying this, because in the context of discussing Covid and its risk, we need to know your standard for what qualifies as “dangerous”

Next time I drive my car (10 min from now), I will remember that I am engaging in an activity similar to walking a tightrope between 2 skyscrapers, according to you.....

It's the most dangerous activity most people undertake on a regular basis. Maybe extremely was hyperbole, but think of all the times you almost died and how many of them were related to driving (or someone else driving).

Crawford Sep 3, 2021 3:03 PM

There are about 40k annual deaths from car accidents in the U.S., every year. And 3 million annual injuries. So basically 1% of the U.S. is injured in car accidents, every year.

I don't think it's unreasonable to call driving a "dangerous", perhaps even an "extremely dangerous" activity, even though it's rarely perceived as such.

https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/home-and...ortation-mode/

I would go so far as to say most Americans believe public transportation is unsafe, and almost all believe its less safe than driving. Yet the relative danger in private vehicles appears about 10x-20x as high as transit in recent years.

10023 Sep 3, 2021 3:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 9386044)
I'd just, very reasonably, be required to work from home for 14 days, which would be pretty annoying/disruptive for me (I don't think you'd like it either), though of course my job wouldn't be in jeopardy (we also don't have "sick" days or "vacation" days, we are trusted to manage our own time...). Others in my research group may also be required to if they are judged to be close contacts. I'm not sure why you think I can't "live my life" because I eat outdoors at restaurants? :???:

Because not all restaurants have outdoor seating, and not all meals are nice to have outdoors, and in most of the world it’s not warm enough to eat outside at night (at least now that summer is over). I’m certainly not wearing a coat to eat a meal unless it’s a ski jacket and I’m on a mountain.

14 days sounds like an unnecessarily long time too.

Partners at my firm suggested at one point that we should tell junior staff not to eat indoors or attend large gatherings (concerts, etc). I insisted that if they were concerned then they should just continue to offer everyone the ability to work fully from home, or work from home themselves. You can’t tell your employees how to live their lives outside of the office, or even expect them to forego things they enjoy because some geriatric senior partner is still nervous about Covid.

Steely Dan Sep 3, 2021 6:18 PM

BOTH of my kids are about to complete a full week of in-person learning at their school for the first time since early march 2020.

i don't know how long the ever-temperamental CTU will allow this situation to go on, but it's been one hell of a spectacular week.


DEATH TO REMOTE "LEARNING"!!!

the urban politician Sep 3, 2021 6:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 9386055)
There are about 40k annual deaths from car accidents in the U.S., every year. And 3 million annual injuries. So basically 1% of the U.S. is injured in car accidents, every year.

I don't think it's unreasonable to call driving a "dangerous", perhaps even an "extremely dangerous" activity, even though it's rarely perceived as such.

https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/home-and...ortation-mode/

I would go so far as to say most Americans believe public transportation is unsafe, and almost all believe its less safe than driving. Yet the relative danger in private vehicles appears about 10x-20x as high as transit in recent years.

Trust me, the only people who think driving a car is dangerous is urbanists in a skyscraper forum who already hate cars anyhow. Not even a remotely unbiased population, and totally unrepresentative of most of American society.

Pregnant women and old ladies drive cars all of the time. So it’s just not perceived as dangerous by nearly anybody in the mainstream.

Camelback Sep 3, 2021 6:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 9386055)
There are about 40k annual deaths from car accidents in the U.S., every year. And 3 million annual injuries. So basically 1% of the U.S. is injured in car accidents, every year.

I don't think it's unreasonable to call driving a "dangerous", perhaps even an "extremely dangerous" activity, even though it's rarely perceived as such.

https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/home-and...ortation-mode/

I would go so far as to say most Americans believe public transportation is unsafe, and almost all believe its less safe than driving. Yet the relative danger in private vehicles appears about 10x-20x as high as transit in recent years.

Americans believe public transportation is unsafe not because they think the train is going to derail from another train hitting it but because they're going to get harassed, mugged or assaulted and would rather not put themselves or their family in danger when they don't have to.

Also, 4 million Americans die every single year from something, over 1% of the American population dies, every single year from something.

So if you wake up in the morning, you run the risk of something killing you the moment you roll out of bed.

It's scary out there, be afraid, be very afraid, something is going to get ya!

the urban politician Sep 3, 2021 6:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 9386289)
BOTH of my kids are about to complete a full week of in-person learning at their school for the first time since early march 2020.

i don't know how long the ever-temperamental CTU will allow this situation to go on, but it's been one hell of a spectacular week.


DEATH TO REMOTE "LEARNING"!!!

Keep your fingers crossed, the CTU is already bitching....

Camelback Sep 3, 2021 6:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9386291)
Trust me, the only people who think driving a car is dangerous is urbanists in a skyscraper forum who already hate cars anyhow. Not even a remotely unbiased population, and totally unrepresentative of most of American society.

Pregnant women and old ladies drive cars all of the time. So it’s just not perceived as dangerous by nearly anybody in the mainstream.

And most people on this site have a car, right?

the urban politician Sep 3, 2021 6:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9386091)

Partners at my firm suggested at one point that we should tell junior staff not to eat indoors or attend large gatherings (concerts, etc). I insisted that if they were concerned then they should just continue to offer everyone the ability to work fully from home, or work from home themselves. You can’t tell your employees how to live their lives outside of the office, or even expect them to forego things they enjoy because some geriatric senior partner is still nervous about Covid.

Wow. Amazing how many people Covid has spooked. Even after (I presume?) vaccination.

Our society wide mental illness worsens....

Steely Dan Sep 3, 2021 6:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9386295)
the CTU is already bitching....

when has the CTU ever NOT been bitching about one thing or another?

;)

Camelback Sep 3, 2021 6:28 PM

2016: The Number of visits to physician offices for injuries: 72.6 million

73 million injuries that required a visit to the doctor, plus all the other injuries that didn't require a doctors visit.

It's scary out there. If you leave your bed, you could get injured and maybe die, so you should probably stay in bed all day, wearing a mask by yourself.

Steely Dan Sep 3, 2021 6:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Camelback (Post 9386301)
you should probably stay in bed all day, wearing a mask by yourself.

inside a plastic bubble

in the basement

of a submarine

at the bottom of an ocean

on the dark side of the moon.


#cantbetoosafe

JManc Sep 3, 2021 6:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil McAvity (Post 9386285)
Nope, i've collected all my info from government sources like the CDC, you should try it you might actually learn something rather than just making erroneous assumptions

Then you have a problem with reading comprehension. This is literally the very first paragraph about covid and pregnancies from the CDC's website:

Quote:

Originally Posted by CDC
Pregnant and recently pregnant women are at a higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 than nonpregnant women. Additionally, pregnant women with COVID-19 are at a higher risk for preterm birth and might have a higher risk for other adverse pregnancy outcomes.


Pedestrian Sep 3, 2021 6:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Camelback (Post 9386000)
Same.

Face coverings don't actually stop the spread of a virus. If they did, then this pandemic would've ended in the spring of 2020.

There's a reason that those dealing with Covid, aren't wearing a cheap face covering, because they would all get sick if they did. Instead they're wearing an N95 mask, gloves, usually eye goggles, and a gown.

Face coverings and cheapie masks increase the amount of times you touch your face, constantly adjusting it as you move around, talk to people.

Touching your face will get you sick.

With 2 active threads on covid it's hard to keep up.

But touching your face probably won't give you covid. "The science" has now pretty much reached a consensus that covid is spread primarily if not almost exclusively by aeroborn droplets of various sizes.

As for masks, I guess I have to repost the following here:

Quote:

'Masks are effective': Stanford Medicine study finds surgical masks help prevent COVID in Bangladesh
Annie Vainshtein
Sep. 1, 2021
Updated: Sep. 1, 2021 3:46 p.m.

A new study by researchers at Stanford Medicine and Yale University has found that just several low-cost interventions can drastically increase mask use in rural communities, and for those who opt to wear them, surgical masks help in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

The researchers analyzed a population of almost 350,000 people from 600 villages in rural Bangladesh over the period of November 2020 to April 2021. Their findings, which were released Wednesday, found thatthose who lived in villages where surgical masks were being promoted were 11% less likely than those in control villages to become infected with COVID-19.

And in people over the age of 60, the impact increased to nearly 35%, the report found.

“What I really would like people to take away from this is to see that we have very rigorous and systematic evidence that masks are effective,” said Ashley Styczynski, a lead author on the study and an infectious disease fellow at Stanford. She added: “I think there were many people who have remained doubtful because of the lack of a randomized control trial around this type of question.”

Four tools — using no-cost masks, offering distribution, having volunteers go around town and remind people to wear them, and modeling through community leadership — were key to improving mask-wearing in the villages, according to the study, which also found that public signage and text messages were far less effective for the communities.

The findings showed that 13% of people in the control villages wore a mask properly, while in the trial villages, 42% of people did so.

The study also looked at the increases of symptoms and positive antibodies among those who were wearing masks versus the control village groups, and found that the villages which included these interventions — for both surgical and cloth masks — had 9% fewer cases of symptomatic COVID-19, and that number increased slightly for surgical masks.

The team is also designing a follow up study to take a deeper look at some of the cases which may not have been reported, such as asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic cases of COVID-19.

It’s important to note that the study was conducted before the delta variant had surfaced in Bangladesh. The alpha variant of the coronavirus was the primary strain at the time of the findings, Styczynski said.

Natural immunity and vaccination could also have been a factor: a small cohort sampled at baseline found that 25% of people had antibodies against COVID-19 and only 2% of the population had been vaccinated when the study began.

The interventions from the study are now being implemented in other parts of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Latin America, and Pakistan.
Can we now lay to rest the notion that "masks don't work"?

Camelback Sep 3, 2021 6:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steely dan (Post 9386305)
inside a plastic bubble

in the basement

of a submarine

at the bottom of an ocean

on the dark side of the moon.


#cantbetoosafe

lol!

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 6:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9386291)
Trust me, the only people who think driving a car is dangerous is urbanists in a skyscraper forum who already hate cars anyhow. Not even a remotely unbiased population, and totally unrepresentative of most of American society.

Pregnant women and old ladies drive cars all of the time. So it’s just not perceived as dangerous by nearly anybody in the mainstream.

wait until your kids start driving

Pedestrian Sep 3, 2021 6:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 9386305)
inside a plastic bubble

in the basement

of a submarine

at the bottom of an ocean

on the dark side of the moon.


#cantbetoosafe

To stay completely safe from covid, I recommend wintering over in the Antarctic, not living on a submarine (you can't drink on a submarine or go outside).

However, since urban politician will now accuse me of advocating that sort of hiding, I did it in 1976 and don't plan to do it again. Yesterday I went out to lunch at a great Cajun/Creole restaurant in San Francisco as I often do. I'm about to go out for some shopping.

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 6:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Camelback (Post 9386293)
Americans believe public transportation is unsafe not because they think the train is going to derail from another train hitting it but because they're going to get harassed, mugged or assaulted and would rather not put themselves or their family in danger when they don't have to.

Also, 4 million Americans die every single year from something, over 1% of the American population dies, every single year from something.

So if you wake up in the morning, you run the risk of something killing you the moment you roll out of bed.

It's scary out there, be afraid, be very afraid, something is going to get ya!

yeah you know you can get harassed, mugged, or assaulted while driving too?
And yes, lots of people die every year of other things that are also dangerous (cancer, heart attacks, suicide).


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