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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

Camelback Sep 2, 2021 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 9385397)
If I lived in a city that had good public light/heavy rail transport that went pretty much anywhere than I’d much rather take that than have to drive everywhere. Buses are disgusting, but I love light rail. Pittsburgh’s T is completely useless and only goes out one way to generic suburbia; it goes really nowhere in the city proper.

If you live in a city that offers that, then your rent goes from $800/month to $2400/month, basically forcing you to take mass transit whether you like it or not.

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 12:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 9385393)
I couldn't do mass transit on a regular basis. Not with the nuts and weirdos or people making a scene/ fighting. At least not the subway or L.

Yeah that doesn't usually happen during commute hours, fortunately, more of a weekend night thing. But there are of course other stressors (missing the train, people not complying with mask mandates, delays), but for the most part I can spend time reading or shitposting on this forum rather than paying attention to the road.

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 12:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 9385382)
Your point? If you cross the street without looking, you’re prob going to get hit. If you go out in public you might get covid and it’s incredibly rare you’ll die or end up in the hospital; especially if you’re vaccinated. I had COVID back in October, and also got vaccinated in February and early March. I got more sick from the rona vaccine than covid.

But we should keep masking indefinitely and social distancing forever. Pittsburgh just mandated that all of those in public school have to wear masks. That’s going to be 3 school years where kids don’t get social cues from faces. That’s going to fuck kids up way more than the tiny tiny percentage that get sick and die.

Seriously, when will we stop with these pointless mask mandates and social distancing? 2027? Luckily I live in Carnegie, just outside the Pittsburgh city limits so businesses around here don’t require masks again yet but still lots of scared morons wear them everywhere and outside. However, my favorite sushi place is downtown and you have to wear a stupid mask in there and I couldn’t understand anything the waiter was saying. It’s not normal human interaction to not see faces, in fact it’s incredibly abnormal, and here we are, almost 2 fucking years later of it. It will never end.


I do go out in public (I take the train to work every day in fact...), I just take a few simple precautions that are not major sacrifices (wearing a mask indoors and eating out outdoors--I just had a very nice meal here on the patio this evening: https://www.torchiopastabar.com/). The mask mandates are hardly pointless (they do reduce cases and help prevent ICUs from overflowing, as well as preventing more onerous restrictions that would be imposed once ICUs are full), although it's unfortunate that they're required. ~2 weeks after implementation, Chicago's case rate is flattening and starting to decline, as are hospitalizations, while ICUs are only 80% full (10% are COVID patients... which tells you if that the number of hospitalized had tripled, which can easily happen in a week with growing case numbers, the ICUs would be full).

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 1:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Camelback (Post 9385411)
If you live in a city that offers that, then your rent goes from $800/month to $2400/month, basically forcing you to take mass transit whether you like it or not.

This is not the thread for this (where the relevant comparison is that transit is much less likely to kill or maim you than driving), but that's also not true... Phoenix and Dallas don't look like they're much cheaper than Chicago or Philly. I looked up downtown condos comparable to mine (1200 sqft, 2 br) in Phoenix and it seems more expensive monthly for mortgage + HOA + taxes + insurance utilities (though maybe they include parking, which you probably need in downtown Phoenix...and I did buy at a good time :) ).

eschaton Sep 3, 2021 2:23 AM

I think it's important to remember there have been a lot of long-standing studies showing how humans assess risk, and it has nothing to do with the actual probability of death or serious injury...it's about control. Hence why (as an example) more people are generally afraid of dying in a plane crash than a car crash, even though planes are actually much safer. In a car we are often the driver, which gives us the illusion of control. Or for that matter all the people who after 9/11 were terrified of dying in a terrorist attack, which made no sense considering how statistically unlikely it was. People fear the most situations where they are not in control, versus ones which are genuinely dangerous.

TWAK Sep 3, 2021 3:32 AM

Phil you seem angry, is this because most Canadians will be vaccinated and you're gonna have to walk on eggshells? Move to Florida or Northern California.

JManc Sep 3, 2021 4:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil McAvity (Post 9385712)
Firstly you can't speak for me so don't try. Secondly, what risk? You mean the absolutely infinitesimal risk a pregnant woman faces? That's a decision she'd have to make but I would tell her the risk is pretty much non-existent. Congratulations to your brother and sister in law for staying at home the entire time over something that was never dangerous to them in the first place:

Because you're an expert and have done exhaustive studies and research...on YouTube of course.

photoLith Sep 3, 2021 4:54 AM

^
Jmanc you know it’s not a dangerous issue to those under 65 though and not dangerous to those over 65 if they are vaccinated.

SIGSEGV Sep 3, 2021 5:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil McAvity (Post 9385720)
Wow, you sound like quite the pussy and you're yet another person that just DOESN'T FUCKING GET IT, covid pretty much only kills the very elderly and/or the very ill while motor vehicle accidents kill people of all ages so those numbers are totally incomparable

I'm trying to imagine the type of person who calls someone a pussy on the internet in 2021.

JManc Sep 3, 2021 5:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 9385786)
^
Jmanc you know it’s not a dangerous issue to those under 65 though and not dangerous to those over 65 if they are vaccinated.

I do but I'm strictly referring to pregnancies which have a whole other set of risk factors and unknowns. I personally haven't worn a mask in months, don't plan to unless I have to and I more or less go about life as normal but if I certainly would be more cautious if we were expecting a child. It's a minor inconvenience in the grand scheme of things.

mrnyc Sep 3, 2021 6:30 AM

lighten up francises — have a dad joke:


the black plague finally got to greet the coronavirus.

“well plagued.”


anybody hear any other ‘rona jokes ???

homebucket Sep 3, 2021 6:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 9384997)
But I would assume his wife is vaccinated so there is no risk, but the media likes to pretend like there’s a giant risk still to get ad clicks.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil McAvity (Post 9385712)
Firstly you can't speak for me so don't try. Secondly, what risk? You mean the absolutely infinitesimal risk a pregnant woman faces? That's a decision she'd have to make but I would tell her the risk is pretty much non-existent. Congratulations to your brother and sister in law for staying at home the entire time over something that was never dangerous to them in the first place

Well it's a good thing you're both not doctors, because the risk to pregnant women is far greater than either of your knowledge and understanding of COVID, which is what is actually non-existent.

First, we know that pregnant women are at increased risk of severe complications from COVID, including ICU admission and requiring mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate is higher for pregnant women with COVID vs nonpregnant women with COVID in the same age range.

Pregnant women with COVID are also at higher risk for preterm delivery, and thus the preterm infants are at risk for the complications associated with preterm birth (increased rates of neonatal respiratory disorders and requirements of NICU admission).

This is why we recommend COVID-19 vaccination for all pregnant women, because the benefits far outweigh the risks. And with the Delta variant being highly transmissible and known to cause breakthrough infections, we also recommend fully vaccinated pregnant women still exercise reasonable precautions, which includes wearing PPE, to avoid exposure to the virus especially in areas where community transmission is high (i.e. indoor settings).

If these risks could be significantly lessened by dining outdoors or doing takeout for ~9 months, I don't see any reason why these precautions should not be taken. Pregnancy is an extremely complex physiologic process, and things like blood pressure and blood glucose need to be closely monitored and controlled in order to reduce risk of maternal-fetal complications. Along those same lines, taking relatively easy measures to prevent COVID infection like getting vaccinated and limiting situations where transmission risk is higher, is absolutely indicated.

It's a good thing you two aren't doctors, because if you were caught making such recommendations and spewing such gross misinformation, the chief medical officer would fire you immediately on the spot.

craigs Sep 3, 2021 6:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 9385794)
I'm trying to imagine the type of person who calls someone a pussy on the internet in 2021.

It's not hard to do--imagine someone who calls himself Fill My Cavity and argues that he's the world's preeminent expert on COVID on parler.

10023 Sep 3, 2021 8:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 9385350)
Regardless of the rules from the city, there are the rules from my employer and the hospital.

If your job or career would be negatively impacted by a positive Covid test, then that is very much an issue that needs to be sorted out with your employer because that isn’t right either.

If you can’t live your life because you’re afraid about catching a common (but now generally harmless) disease that would force you to take sick days, then the balance between work and life is really off.

hauntedheadnc Sep 3, 2021 11:56 AM

We're back to masking up at the clinic where I work, and we've suspended group therapy sessions for the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, up in Asheville, ten people died within 48 hours of covid at Mission Hospital.

10023 Sep 3, 2021 12:59 PM

^ all unvaccinated I’m sure

the urban politician Sep 3, 2021 1:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 9385297)
Yes, millions of Americans are mangled every year from motor vehicle collisions.

Driving is EXTREMELY dangerous were your exact words.

Extremely

So every time anyone gets in a car to get groceries, they are doing something extremely dangerous.. Just want to make sure we have you on the record saying this, because in the context of discussing Covid and its risk, we need to know your standard for what qualifies as “dangerous”

Next time I drive my car (10 min from now), I will remember that I am engaging in an activity similar to walking a tightrope between 2 skyscrapers, according to you.....

the urban politician Sep 3, 2021 2:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eschaton (Post 9385663)
I think it's important to remember there have been a lot of long-standing studies showing how humans assess risk, and it has nothing to do with the actual probability of death or serious injury...it's about control. Hence why (as an example) more people are generally afraid of dying in a plane crash than a car crash, even though planes are actually much safer. In a car we are often the driver, which gives us the illusion of control. Or for that matter all the people who after 9/11 were terrified of dying in a terrorist attack, which made no sense considering how statistically unlikely it was. People fear the most situations where they are not in control, versus ones which are genuinely dangerous.

True point. Fear inflates perception of risk, and the almost nonsensical nationwide fear over Covid, worsened by media sensationalism, inflates peoples’ perception of the harm Covid causes to vaccinated people.

Covid is mostly just an excuse now for people to shirk responsibilities for another year.

the urban politician Sep 3, 2021 2:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 9385830)
Well it's a good thing you're both not doctors, because the risk to pregnant women is far greater than either of your knowledge and understanding of COVID, which is what is actually non-existent.

First, we know that pregnant women are at increased risk of severe complications from COVID, including ICU admission and requiring mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate is higher for pregnant women with COVID vs nonpregnant women with COVID in the same age range.

Pregnant women with COVID are also at higher risk for preterm delivery, and thus the preterm infants are at risk for the complications associated with preterm birth (increased rates of neonatal respiratory disorders and requirements of NICU admission).

This is why we recommend COVID-19 vaccination for all pregnant women, because the benefits far outweigh the risks. And with the Delta variant being highly transmissible and known to cause breakthrough infections, we also recommend fully vaccinated pregnant women still exercise reasonable precautions, which includes wearing PPE, to avoid exposure to the virus especially in areas where community transmission is high (i.e. indoor settings).

If these risks could be significantly lessened by dining outdoors or doing takeout for ~9 months, I don't see any reason why these precautions should not be taken. Pregnancy is an extremely complex physiologic process, and things like blood pressure and blood glucose need to be closely monitored and controlled in order to reduce risk of maternal-fetal complications. Along those same lines, taking relatively easy measures to prevent COVID infection like getting vaccinated and limiting situations where transmission risk is higher, is absolutely indicated.

It's a good thing you two aren't doctors, because if you were caught making such recommendations and spewing such gross misinformation, the chief medical officer would fire you immediately on the spot.

Agree with this.

I don’t see any reason why pregnant women can’t go a few extra steps to be careful. Vaccinating is by far the most important one.

There is a Cardiologist who sits next to me. I saw him double masked and I said to him, “Congrats! Your wife is pregnant?”

He laughed and said “Wow, you’re perceptive”

Camelback Sep 3, 2021 2:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 9385815)
I personally haven't worn a mask in months, don't plan to unless I have to and I more or less go about life as normal

Same.

Face coverings don't actually stop the spread of a virus. If they did, then this pandemic would've ended in the spring of 2020.

There's a reason that those dealing with Covid, aren't wearing a cheap face covering, because they would all get sick if they did. Instead they're wearing an N95 mask, gloves, usually eye goggles, and a gown.

Face coverings and cheapie masks increase the amount of times you touch your face, constantly adjusting it as you move around, talk to people.

Touching your face will get you sick.


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