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Martin Pal Nov 9, 2013 6:27 PM

a picture is worth...
 
Nice series on the United Artists Theatre!
Maybe because Veteran's Day is Monday, but I noticed the lonely (?) sailor in this photograph. Lonely or ponderous or bored or contemplative or hungry or lost or awol or another 93 words...

Quote:

Originally Posted by BifRayRock (Post 6332948)


GaylordWilshire Nov 9, 2013 6:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6333116)
Apologies if this house has been discussed before, but I found the card on Ebay earlier, and would like to know more about it. It's titled "Vintage Los Angeles House Real Photo Card", but what caught my eye was the unusual wrap-around details on the roof. The seller dates it as 1930-1940, and the photo credit on the back is "Graham Photo Co., 110 So Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal., U.S.A.", but no location is given. The number by the door looks like 86, which may narrow down the possible locations.

http://img42.imageshack.us/img42/8193/h9fx.jpg
Ebay

There must be others in the county, but the only 2-digit addresses I can think of within the city limits are in Venice, close to the beach. Some private streets, such as Berkeley Square, had their own 2-digit systems. This house doesn't appear to be in Venice, and I know it's not Berkeley Square. Could it be Hollywood before the annexations 1909-1915, which resulted in many address realignments and street-name changes? Could be in any number of towns in SoCal. Santa Monica? Pasadena? sopas, are you there to give us a little insight into address numbering in your vicinity?

I ran across the following link, which at first glance appeared to be the definitive story on L.A. address history, and maybe it is, but then it went off into quadrants and azimuths, nipple streets and parent streets... so I really only scanned it--but you might find something here:

http://libraries.maine.edu/Spatial/g...s/gi94040.html

ethereal_reality Nov 9, 2013 10:10 PM

I wasn't aware of this 48 year old LAX restaurant until the article in today's Los Angeles Times.
http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-p...#axzz2kBkvYLsF

http://imageshack.us/a/img35/2224/shpg.jpg

If you're not a subscriber to the Times, go here...The Daily Breeze.
http://www.dailybreeze.com/general-n...plans-to-close

The Proud Bird is located at 11022 Aviation blvd.
__

ethereal_reality Nov 9, 2013 10:21 PM

posted by GaylordWilshire
http://imageshack.us/a/img547/8960/e89n.jpg

What is that contraption on the roof? Part of a refrigeration unit?
(it seems awfully large for such a small store)
__

GaylordWilshire Nov 9, 2013 10:34 PM

:previous:

I assume that's what that is, ER, perhaps for the meat. It resembles the outside water tower that was part of the central air conditioning of the house I grew up in--a system installed in the 1940s. But this is a little early for air conditioning....

GaylordWilshire Nov 9, 2013 10:34 PM

http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/4691/z0rw.jpgLAT June 5, 1904


Looking for something else, I stumbled upon this illustration in the Times describing the new house being built by "T. X. Onam"--the man's initials were actually T. H., for Thomas Henry, and he was an English-born mining engineer. Charles E. Shattuck was the architect. Still standing after 109 years at 1324 S. Westlake Ave.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-L...2520PM.bmp.jpgGSV
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-c...2520PM.bmp.jpgGSV

Looks like the upper front windows were altered before the final blueprints, or in a later remodeling.

At the time of his death in 1915, Oxnam was living at 2211 Cambridge Street, also still standing. The 5-block Cambridge Street is worth checking out for its collection of intact houses from the 1910s, including a well-known Greene & Greene at 2175 Cambridge.

ethereal_reality Nov 9, 2013 10:46 PM

:previous: -nice find GW!



L.A. Confidential 496 E. Avenue 28
http://imageshack.us/a/img703/9819/5dk6.jpg
http://www.cinemasquid.com/blu-ray/m...8-33e6faf9c552

http://imageshack.us/a/img5/3795/5b5y.jpg
GSV

http://imageshack.us/a/img802/345/2bw6.jpg
http://www.cinemasquid.com/blu-ray/m...8-33e6faf9c552

http://imageshack.us/a/img35/1175/8k0y.jpg
GSV

__

ethereal_reality Nov 9, 2013 11:23 PM

S. Central and 67th Street, January 1937
http://imageshack.us/a/img5/6938/qibe.jpg
ebay

detail/neighborhood safeway store, model drugs
http://imageshack.us/a/img713/5041/jhjc.jpg

-that's quite an utilitarian street light. -looks like an afterthought.


detail/I spy lido club, does that say goodyear apts.?
http://imageshack.us/a/img844/1218/4w2o.jpg

stamp on back
http://imageshack.us/a/img10/5059/zkua.jpg
__

GaylordWilshire Nov 9, 2013 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6333486)
:previous: -nice find GW!
http://imageshack.us/a/img35/1175/8k0y.jpg
GSV__

Damn stucco... only belongs on Mediterranean houses. And I wonder--how good for the structure could slapping stucco on a wooden building actually be?

As for
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6333502)
detail/I spy lido club, does that say goodyear apts.?
http://imageshack.us/a/img844/1218/4w2o.jpg

...the Goodyear Apartments were at 6418 S Central and the Goodyear Tire plant was at 6701, which would be behind the camera, across from the Safeway (6702).

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6333502)
S. Central and 67th Street, January 1937
http://imageshack.us/a/img5/6938/qibe.jpg
ebay

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1254

Chuckaluck Nov 10, 2013 12:05 AM

In time for Armistice Day.


1918 - Military Balloons float above San Gabriel (Note Army Balloon School in foreground)

http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...war&DMROTATE=0

http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...d/3326/rec/216







http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...war&DMROTATE=0http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...war&DMROTATE=0
http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...war&DMROTATE=0http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...war&DMROTATE=0







Quote:

When the town was officially incorporated in 1903, Baldwin became its first mayor. But the next year would be see the fulfillment of Baldwin’s dream – the building of the Santa Anita Race Track.

Located at the present site of the Arcadia County Park, the grandstand presented a beautiful view of the San Gabriel Mountains behind the running thoroughbreds. But for Baldwin, his dream was not to last. In 1909, California banned horse racing and the race track was forced to close. Baldwin died the same year.

In 1912, the grandstand burned and the property went unused until 1917 when Anita Baldwin sold the land to Los Angeles County, who in turn deeded it to the War Department, which utilized it as an Army balloon school during World War I. http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ca-s...elvalley3.html


The FIRST Santa Anita Race Track, circa 1908.

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/phot...aRacetrack.jpghttp://www.legendsofamerica.com/phot...aRacetrack.jpg

Those Who Squirm! Nov 10, 2013 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 5704286)
'each...cover saved 500 pounds of metal'?? How? Manhole covers are seriously heavy but still, they can be moved by one man with a long-handled hook and some elbow grease. Are they suggesting manhole covers weighed 500 pounds?

It seems plausible to me. If you've ever done free weight training recall the size of the standard 45# iron plate--and a manhole cover is much wider and thicker. Or, if not actually thicker, it still needs a lot of bracing on the underside, to support the vehicles that pass over it. Also, the lone maintenance worker needs only to lever it up on one side and slide it over to expose the hatch. It's far easier to lift something on one end, or to drag it around, than it would be to clean and jerk it over your head.

Those Who Squirm! Nov 10, 2013 12:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6332527)
A&M are definitely listed there in 1973. Here's a listing from that block from the 1973 City Directory - do any of the other names ring a bell?

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...LALaBreaAv.jpg
rescarta.lapl.org

It was the Sherman School. Thanks!

ethereal_reality Nov 10, 2013 12:47 AM

:previous: Mardi Gras Massage. -that sounds like a real stress reducer! ;)
__



LAFD-Battalion 7, AMC Matador, circa Feb. 1974.
http://imageshack.us/a/img191/4976/947i.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lafdhs/...57626210762053

GW, I wonder if 496 E. Ave. 28 was stucco when they filmed L.A. Confidential. It looks like they might have painted it to resemble wood.
-just a thought
__

unihikid Nov 10, 2013 2:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6333282)
There must be others in the county, but the only 2-digit addresses I can think of within the city limits are in Venice, close to the beach. Some private streets, such as Berkeley Square, had their own 2-digit systems. This house doesn't appear to be in Venice, and I know it's not Berkeley Square. Could it be Hollywood before the annexations 1909-1915, which resulted in many address realignments and street-name changes? Could be in any number of towns in SoCal. Santa Monica? Pasadena? sopas, are you there to give us a little insight into address numbering in your vicinity?

I ran across the following link, which at first glance appeared to be the definitive story on L.A. address history, and maybe it is, but then it went off into quadrants and azimuths, nipple streets and parent streets... so I really only scanned it--but you might find something here:

http://libraries.maine.edu/Spatial/g...s/gi94040.html

sopas might be the better one to answer this,but i use to live on the boarder of south pas/alhambra/el sereno over on maycrest and huntington(way up at the end of maycrest).but on the alhambra side of huntington(right at main street),it seems that if you are going towards south pasadena on main in alhambra they go into two digit addresses (to make it simple start at the walgreens on main and fremont..head towards huntington)hope this might help.

Lwize Nov 10, 2013 2:53 AM

Noirish LA Sleuths - I am requesting your help.

What is the history of this building, located on the NE corner of S Centinela and Palms in WLA?
It's been vacant for years, and used to house Mrs Gooch's health food store a few decades ago.
Was it originally a supermarket?
Please advise.

http://larry.wizegallery.com/VWV/Gooch.jpg
(GSV - hosted by me)

belmont bob Nov 10, 2013 3:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6333282)
There must be others in the county, but the only 2-digit addresses I can think of within the city limits are in Venice, close to the beach. Some private streets, such as Berkeley Square, had their own 2-digit systems. This house doesn't appear to be in Venice, and I know it's not Berkeley Square. Could it be Hollywood before the annexations 1909-1915, which resulted in many address realignments and street-name changes? Could be in any number of towns in SoCal. Santa Monica? Pasadena? sopas, are you there to give us a little insight into address numbering in your vicinity?

I ran across the following link, which at first glance appeared to be the definitive story on L.A. address history, and maybe it is, but then it went off into quadrants and azimuths, nipple streets and parent streets... so I really only scanned it--but you might find something here:

http://libraries.maine.edu/Spatial/g...s/gi94040.html

haha, yeah there are two digit addresses in the county...over 40 years ago I lived at 90 Monterey Rd. in South Pasadena, while working at 56 Del Mar in Pasadena. And now I work at One Innovation Way in Pomona. But try as I might I can't think of anyplace in LA with a 2 digit number.

Retired_in_Texas Nov 10, 2013 5:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6333531)
Damn stucco... only belongs on Mediterranean houses. And I wonder--how good for the structure could slapping stucco on a wooden building actually be?

http://imageshack.us/a/img35/1175/8k0y.jpg



http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1254

Is it "real stucco" or is it EIFS, aka Synthetic Stucco? From the appearance of the exterior window trim it looks like it may be a very poorly done EIFS installation which actually would have a layer of foam sheathing over the original siding before applying the EIFS. If it is EIFS the installer failed miserably in installing proper flashing where the porch roof meets the walls. Bad news is over wood EIFS can trap moisture and will often result in more damage to wood siding than leaving it unpainted and exposed to the elements. Not really a good idea and the texture does not really look all that much like real stucco. I hate stucco, has no place in any climate aside from parts of the desert Southwest.

CityBoyDoug Nov 10, 2013 5:56 AM

Older than God.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6333502)
S. Central and 67th Street, January 1937
http://imageshack.us/a/img5/6938/qibe.jpg
ebay

detail/neighborhood safeway store, model drugs
http://imageshack.us/a/img713/5041/jhjc.jpg

-that's quite an utilitarian street light. -looks like an afterthought.


detail/I spy lido club, does that say goodyear apts.?
http://imageshack.us/a/img844/1218/4w2o.jpg

stamp on back
http://imageshack.us/a/img10/5059/zkua.jpg
__

ER: That light appears that it might be one of the old old old electric-arc street lamps. They're a major headache because they require substantial costly maintenance. They would have been phased out when regular street light poles had been installed. I don't see any in this photo.

http://www.shorpy.com/files/arc_lamp.jpg

Those Who Squirm! Nov 10, 2013 6:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lwize (Post 6333668)
Noirish LA Sleuths - I am requesting your help.

What is the history of this building, located on the NE corner of S Centinela and Palms in WLA?
It's been vacant for years, and used to house Mrs Gooch's health food store a few decades ago.
Was it originally a supermarket?
Please advise.

http://larry.wizegallery.com/VWV/Gooch.jpg
(GSV - hosted by me)

According to the county assessor's website, the build date is 1946, but I know this information is not always historically correct. Usually both build date and effective build date are given; for this building they are both 1946, but that is not always the case.

Also, the assessor's website doesn't tell you about what might have been there before the present structure came into being. (Or, well, if it does, I don't know how to get to it.)

Those Who Squirm! Nov 10, 2013 7:02 AM

Two-digit house numbers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6333282)
There must be others in the county, but the only 2-digit addresses I can think of within the city limits are in Venice, close to the beach. Some private streets, such as Berkeley Square, had their own 2-digit systems. This house doesn't appear to be in Venice, and I know it's not Berkeley Square. Could it be Hollywood before the annexations 1909-1915, which resulted in many address realignments and street-name changes? Could be in any number of towns in SoCal. Santa Monica? Pasadena? sopas, are you there to give us a little insight into address numbering in your vicinity?

Saint James Park, Saint James Place, and Chester Place, adjacent to the downtown campus of Mount St. Mary College, all seem to have or have had and address numbered 86. 86 Chester Place may still exist but GSV doesn't go there. For SJ Pk and SJ Pl, it appears that such an address may have existed but no longer, possibly having been replaced by a parking lot for the college. It's hard to tell because of the luxuriant greenery. I do know that for one stretch of SJ Pk, the addresses go from 92 to 44, or something like that and the intervening properties are long since lost to history.

I do wonder myself when the numbering got standardized and why Venice was able to duck out of it. FWIW the condemnation notice posted on the Avila house, just before its rescue by Christine Sterling, used a two-digit address, referring to it as something like "the house known as 24 - 26 Olvera Street". Even by then, I'm pretty sure that most of the street numbers had been standardized, though.

Quote:

I ran across the following link, which at first glance appeared to be the definitive story on L.A. address history, and maybe it is, but then it went off into quadrants and azimuths, nipple streets and parent streets... so I really only scanned it--but you might find something here:

http://libraries.maine.edu/Spatial/g...s/gi94040.html
I really must discover what a nipple street could possibly be.


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