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KVNBKLYN Sep 19, 2009 3:19 PM

These people do absolutely nothing all day and get paid handsomely for it. The only rationale they can come up with for why they shouldn't be fired is that they might wake up from their naps just in time to see you being dragged away to be raped while they push an emergency button and sit in their booth listening to you scream (actual story). This whole idea they provide security is absolutely insane. What kind of security are they going to provide when they're not supposed to leave their bullet proof booths, from which they can't see most of the station? If security is an issue, how about hire security guards or install security cameras?

NYC4Life Sep 22, 2009 10:08 AM

NY1

09/21/2009 11:10 PM
City Subways Pick Up Green Energy Funds

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/5918/66642952.jpg

The city is set to receive $2 million in federal stimulus funds that will be earmarked for greener technology in the subways.

Officials say they plan to install wireless control points linked to third rail heaters.

The project will allow the heaters to be remotely turned on and off from a central control hub, depending on the weather.

The technology will minimize electricity usage and eliminate wasted energy. Officials say the project will also create jobs.

The money is part of $100 million in grants being distributed nationwide to help reduce global warming.



Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Oct 21, 2009 6:52 PM

NY1

Updated 12:10 PM
PATH Train Strikes Bumper; All Injuries Minor

http://img28.imageshack.us/img28/6760/76129823.jpg

A PATH train struck a bumper block at the end of the platform at a Midtown station this morning, injuring about a dozen people.

The New York City Fire Department says six passengers and one worker were taken to area hospitals for their injuries. Three others were treated on the scene.

The train from Hoboken, N.J. was pulling into the 33rd Street Station under Herald Square at around 8:15 a.m. when it hit the bumper.

Service on the line was not interrupted.

Traffic lanes around the station were temporarily closed, but have since reopened.



Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Oct 21, 2009 6:58 PM

NY1

Atheist Ad Campaign To Hit Subways

http://img28.imageshack.us/img28/5958/57200843.jpg

A group of non-believers is using the subway system to try to win over riders.

Ads promoting atheism will be rolling out in 12 Manhattan subway stations.

They feature the slogan, "A Million New Yorkers Are Good Without God. Are You?"

The campaign, coordinated by the organization Coalition of Reason, will appear for a month beginning next Monday.

Another group, New York City Atheists, ran a similar campaign on city buses in July.



Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

Swede Oct 21, 2009 8:34 PM

^More low-key than the campaign that was up in the subway (and in the streets) here a few months ago. Will be fun seeing how it plays out.

Very nice to hear no-one was seriously injured in the PATH accident. Not nice to hear there was an accident, of course.

KVNBKLYN Nov 13, 2009 9:15 PM

It seems like the 7 train extension is actually moving along. Too bad the MTA's only update in a year consists of three photos. I guess we can't expect that the public be kept informed on a project it's funding for a mere $2 billion. :shrug:

Here are the photos from http://www.mta.info/capconstr/7ext/construction2.htm:

http://www.mta.info/capconstr/7ext/i...ne_9553_sm.jpg

http://www.mta.info/capconstr/7ext/i...ne_9946_sm.jpg

http://www.mta.info/capconstr/7ext/i...ne_9919_sm.jpg

NYC4Life Nov 14, 2009 4:01 AM

NY1

11/13/2009 09:17 PM
New Metro North Station A Home Run For Yankees Fans
By: NY1 News

http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/7072/81437502.jpg

Taking the Metro North train to Yankees games was a home run for baseball fans this season.

The new Yankee Stadium stop on the Hudson Line, adjacent to the new Yankee Stadium in Highbridge, Bronx, opened in May for both baseball fans and Bronx residents.

The $91 million station, which took two years to build, includes a 10,000-square-feet mezzanine and a new pedestrian overpass.

"We feel it was very successful. We carried almost a half-million people to the games in our first season," said Robert MacLagger of Metro North Development. "We reached a high of 6,000 people during the World Series per game, for Game 6 of the World Series."

However, not enough people use the stop when there's no baseball.

Metro North says it will try to better promote the station to Bronx residents and workers.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

Busy Bee Nov 14, 2009 3:58 PM

Too bad it shows like a styleless banal shed. For as much as Yankee Stadium cost, they should have decked this sucker out in limestone to match the stadium, instead, well, instead. This just doesn't look like a high non-resident exposure station on a world class system.

NYonward Nov 14, 2009 4:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 4558518)
Too bad it shows like a styleless banal shed. For as much as Yankee Stadium cost, they should have decked this sucker out in limestone to match the stadium, instead, well, instead. This just doesn't look like a high non-resident exposure station on a world class system.

To my knowledge the Yankees didn't even put up a penny for this station. You have them to thank for the blandness. In all fairness, beautifying the train station would take away from the impressive look of the new stadium and since few apparently use the station on non-game days it was a good choice.

NYonward Nov 17, 2009 10:35 PM

November 17, 2009
Countdown Clocks for 3 Bronx Subway Stations
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

In London, Paris and Washington, subway riders need only look up at a digital sign to know how many minutes it will be until the next train arrives. New York’s straphangers usually resort to peering into a darkened tunnel.

But for some riders in the Bronx, that often-futile search for a headlight is about to end. New York City Transit announced on Monday that it would debut the first batch of subway countdown clocks next month at three stations on the No. 6 line, a preview of a technology that officials hope to extend to all the numbered lines by spring 2011.

The Bronx countdown clocks will be similar to those on the L line, where they have been in place since 2007.

Transit officials also announced plans for a similar system along the 50th Street crosstown bus route, extending a project that began on 34th Street, where bus shelters are already equipped with countdown displays.

Although the 50th Street project is in its early stages, the announcements were the latest sign that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is making good on its long-held promise to provide riders with information that is a standard feature in other major transit networks.

“People have been crying for this for a long time,” said Andrew Albert, a riders’ advocate and member of the authority’s board.

Still, riders may want to hold off celebrating just yet. Last month, officials said they hoped to install all clocks at 152 subway stations by December 2010; that is now expected to be April 2011.

And while the No. 6 line, with 700,000 rides a day, is the city’s busiest, the stations selected for next month’s rollout are some of the sleepiest. On average, those stations — Brook Avenue, East 149th Street and Longwood Avenue — each carry about 4,500 rides each weekday, fewer than 3 percent of the rides handled at Grand Central. The clocks on 34th Street, in contrast, debuted along a highly trafficked route.

“Work was completed first at those stations, that’s why they will be the first to be turned on,” said Charles Seaton, a spokesman for New York City Transit.

There are no plans in place for the other lettered lines to get the clocks until at least 2014.

New electronic signs will also be in place soon at the 42nd Street shuttle and the Flatbush Avenue station, in Brooklyn, according to transit officials, but they will tell riders where the next train is arriving, not when.

The layouts of those stations have long created confusion among passengers over which track has the next arriving train. Large displays will be installed in the next few weeks, replacing older signs that are partly hidden, the officials said.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/ny...=subway&st=cse

NYC4Life Nov 19, 2009 11:29 AM

NY1

11/18/2009 05:10 PM
Riders Spared In Latest MTA Budget
By: Bobby Cuza

http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/6144/37005011.jpg

While the city and state continue to grapple with major budget shortfalls, the news over at the MTA is surprisingly less grim. NY1's Bobby Cuza filed the following report.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority's 2010 budget, presented to board members Wednesday, is devoid of any big surprises.

Thanks to the $1.9 billion a year bailout approved by Albany back in May, and the fare increase that took effect in June, a major financial crisis has been averted.

"This budget has no service cuts. It has no fare increases. So that’s a positive thing," said MTA board member James Sedore.

But there is potential trouble ahead. The MTA is currently in court fighting an arbitrator's decision to give transit workers 11 percent raises over three years -- a move that would blow a massive hole in its budget. Facing his own budget crisis, Governor David Paterson has proposed cutting state aid to the MTA by $115 million a year.

"I think overall the MTA remains in a very, very fragile financial position," said MTA Chairman & CEO Jay Walder.



Walder says the agency can no longer count on help from Albany. In order to restore its credibility, he also says the agency must make fundamental changes to the way it does business from top to bottom.

"We have to look at everything. We have to look at the procurements, we have to look at the staffing, we have to look at the maintenance," Walder said. "We have to look everywhere that we can be more efficient in what we’re doing."

"For 2010, it looks like we’re reasonably stable, and that’s good news for the rider," said William Henderson of the Permanent Citizens Advisory Committee to the MTA.

While fares will hold steady through next year, the reprieve doesn't last long. As announced earlier this year, the MTA still plans to raise fares by about 7.5 percent on January 1, 2011.



Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

Bootstrap Bill Nov 19, 2009 5:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYC4Life (Post 4566743)
While fares will hold steady through next year, the reprieve doesn't last long. As announced earlier this year, the MTA still plans to raise fares by about 7.5 percent on January 1, 2011.

They could double fares and they would still be far less than the cost of driving.

Owning and operating a car can cost more than $600 per month - much more if you have a luxury car. A 30 day Metro pass costs $89, or less than $3 per day.

Is it reasonable for fares to be this low when transit agencies all over the country are facing huge deficits? I think cities like NYC - where you truly can get around without a car - should greatly increase fares to keep service where it should be and to finance needed improvements. It may hurt low income people - they could compensate for this by offering a low income monthly pass for those who make less than the Federal poverty level.

mwadswor Nov 19, 2009 5:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4567078)
They could double fares and they would still be far less than the cost of driving.

Owning and operating a car can cost more than $600 per month - much more if you have a luxury car. A 30 day Metro pass costs $89, or less than $3 per day.

Is it reasonable for fares to be this low when transit agencies all over the country are facing huge deficits? I think cities like NYC - where you truly can get around without a car - should greatly increase fares to keep service where it should be and to finance needed improvements. It may hurt low income people - they could compensate for this by offering a low income monthly pass for those who make less than the Federal poverty level.

While it's not the most politically correct thing to do, another option would be to have higher fares for rail than bus. It's not so common in the western hemisphere, but in dense Asian cities it's not uncommon for the richest to drive, the middle class to take rail transit and express busses, and the lower classes to take local busses. It's not like the subway is hurting for riders or competing with cars for cost effectiveness. Raise the prices as much as they need to be raised for proper subway service, but leave bus fares low for the poor.

KVNBKLYN Nov 19, 2009 6:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4567078)
They could double fares and they would still be far less than the cost of driving.

Owning and operating a car can cost more than $600 per month - much more if you have a luxury car. A 30 day Metro pass costs $89, or less than $3 per day.

Is it reasonable for fares to be this low when transit agencies all over the country are facing huge deficits? I think cities like NYC - where you truly can get around without a car - should greatly increase fares to keep service where it should be and to finance needed improvements. It may hurt low income people - they could compensate for this by offering a low income monthly pass for those who make less than the Federal poverty level.

This is a ridiculous idea. What do operating deficits in other transit agencies have to do with the MTA, particularly since the MTA has one of the highest percentage of operating costs covered by fares?

You want to reduce deficits, how about actually pass on the costs of driving to drivers? That $600 number you mention doesn't actually cover the cost of government services provided to drivers. How about eliminate the subsidies drivers are given? Drivers don't pay special fees to pave roads, clear snow from roads, control road traffic with signals and police, repair bridges, etc, etc, etc - that's all paid out of general funds from taxes levied on everyone. How about instate a driver fare?

KVNBKLYN Nov 19, 2009 6:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mwadswor (Post 4567098)
While it's not the most politically correct thing to do, another option would be to have higher fares for rail than bus. It's not so common in the western hemisphere, but in dense Asian cities it's not uncommon for the richest to drive, the middle class to take rail transit and express busses, and the lower classes to take local busses. It's not like the subway is hurting for riders or competing with cars for cost effectiveness. Raise the prices as much as they need to be raised for proper subway service, but leave bus fares low for the poor.

This wouldn't do much in NY since very few buses travel between boroughs. Most everyone traveling from, say, Queens to Manhattan would still need to take the subway, rich and poor alike. And buses don't travel between boroughs because the geography of New York funnels traffic into choke points at bridges and tunnels which wouldn't be able to handle the vast increase in bus service needed to transport the poor.

mwadswor Nov 19, 2009 7:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KVNBKLYN (Post 4567185)
This wouldn't do much in NY since very few buses travel between boroughs. Most everyone traveling from, say, Queens to Manhattan would still need to take the subway, rich and poor alike. And buses don't travel between boroughs because the geography of New York funnels traffic into choke points at bridges and tunnels which wouldn't be able to handle the vast increase in bus service needed to transport the poor.

Good point, I wasn't thinking about the bridges and tunnels.

NYC4Life Nov 19, 2009 7:58 PM

NY1

11/19/2009 10:21 AM
New Rules Apply To Hudson River Airspace

http://img694.imageshack.us/img694/2449/29348608.jpg

New rules go into effect today for aircraft flying over the congested Hudson River airspace.

The Federal Aviation Administration finalized regulations, which will require pilots to use separate airspace corridors.

Aircraft being handled by air traffic controllers will fly above 1,300 feet.

Pilots who wants to fly over the area without air traffic control must stay between 1,000 and 1,300 feet.

Local planes and helicopters, including those on sightseeing tours, will be restricted to fly under 1,000 feet.

The new rules also call for southbound air traffic to stay on the New Jersey side of the river and northbound aircraft to hug the Manhattan side.

The changes are in response to a deadly collision between a sightseeing helicopter and a small private plane in August that killed nine people.



Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Nov 19, 2009 8:06 PM

NY1

Updated 11:09 AM
Port Authority To Reportedly Eliminate Cash Tolls

http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/6081/82470516.jpg

The Port Authority is reportedly working on a plan to eliminate cash tolls entirely.

The Daily News reports the agency would photograph the license plate of drivers without E-ZPass and send a bill to their homes.

Port Authority Commissioner Sidney Holmes told the Daily News the plan would speed up traffic, and that the cameras would help get toll beaters to pay up.

However, the New York Civil Liberties Union says photographing license plates would be a privacy nightmare.

It is unclear if the issue will be put up for a vote at today's Port Authority board meeting.

The cash tolls would be eliminated on the George Washington, Bayonne and Goethals Bridges, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels and the Outerbridge Crossing.

No time frame has been established for installing the system.

Today's board meeting will also discuss development at the World Trade Center site.



Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Nov 19, 2009 8:08 PM

NY1

Updated 1:24 PM
FAA: Flight System Back To Normal

The Federal Aviation Administration says that its flight computer system is back to normal after glitches caused nationwide delays this morning.

Flights at airports across the country, including the three major New York City-area airports, were delayed or cancelled after a glitch in the system that automatically processes flight plan information.

Air traffic controllers were forced to enter flight plans manually, which caused the entire system to slow down.

City area airports only reported minor delays.

The world's busiest airport, Atlanta's International Airport, was most affected by delays.

FAA officials say there were no problems with controllers' radar data or voice communication, so airline safety was unaffected.

The FAA urges travelers to check with airlines for delays before heading to the airport.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Nov 19, 2009 8:12 PM

NY1

11/18/2009 09:57 AM
Bus-Only Lanes Planned For Manhattan's East Side

http://img24.imageshack.us/img24/5481/82496754.jpg

The push to bring quicker bus service to Manhattan's East Side appears to be in the fast lane.

Bus-only lanes are coming to First and Second Avenues next September – with one lane reserved for each avenue from 125th Street to Houston Street.

The Department of Transportation next month will unveil detailed plans for the lanes, which are set to include technology to change traffic lights green when buses approach.

The DOT may also place barriers along some parts of the avenues to keep cars from invading the bus lane, and may install MetroCard readers on sidewalks to speed up boarding. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority says the agency is buying dozens of longer buses, with three doors instead of two to also speed the process.

The plan would be the second of its type, following the BX12 route between Manhattan and the Bronx.



Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Nov 21, 2009 1:16 AM

NY1

Updated 12:38 PM
First Gridlock Alert Day Is Here

http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/8441/66975252.jpg

Today is the first gridlock alert day of the holiday season and people are advised to use mass transit.

The next gridlock alert day is the day before Thanksgiving, November 25th.

The other gridlock alert days are December 2nd, 4th, 11th, 16th, 17, 18th, and 23rd.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Nov 21, 2009 1:20 AM

NY1

Updated 10:48 AM
Shared Taxi Pilot Program To Launch Next Month
By: NY1 News

http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/3007/86587051.jpg

A plan for shared taxi rides in the city is close to launching.

The Taxi and Limousine Commissioner says the pilot program should be ready to roll out next month.

The plan announced and approved in May allows cabs to take multiple passengers at a flat rate from designated pick up spots during the morning rush. Passengers can be dropped off on the way downtown, with no pickups allowed along the way.

Pickup locations are expected to be 57th and Eighth Avenue, and 72nd Street at both Third Avenue and Columbus Avenue.

The plan is being billed as a way of clearing congested streets, saving riders cash, and earning drivers more money.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Nov 21, 2009 1:26 AM

NY1

Updated 6:04 PM
Deadline Passes For Pedicab Registration
By: NY1 News

http://img340.imageshack.us/img340/7724/26836486.jpg

Today marked the deadline for pedicab operators to register their businesses with the city.

More than 150 businesses have applied for 844 licenses to operate the pedicabs.

Today marks the end of a 60-day period owners were given to complete the applications.

Much like cabs, licensed pedicabs are being given medallions, signifying they have been inspected, are safe to operate and have posted rate cards.

"The department has really been out there for weeks doing everything we can, frankly for months, everything we can to make sure that anybody's who's in the pedicab business who intends to stay in that business, knows what is expected of them in the law,” said Department of Consumer Affairs Commissioner Jonathan Mintz. “Most importantly, they need to make sure that they are accountable to the public, and that their pedicab vehicles are safe."

Over 300 drivers have also applied for licenses to drive pedicabs. Those licenses are separate from the ones to operate a business, and will still be available after today's deadline.

Industry estimates say there are thousands of pedicabs on the road.





Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Dec 12, 2009 6:18 PM

NY1

Updated 11:23 AM
Broke MTA May Eliminate Subway Lines, Bus Service

http://img24.imageshack.us/img24/7820/67984028.jpg

The cash-strapped Metropolitan Transportation Authority is looking at massive budget cuts next year, and straphangers could end up losing some subway lines and bus routes completely.

An MTA source told NY1 on Friday that the W and Z subway lines are on the table for complete elimination and the G and M subway lines could also be shortened.

Riders might also face increased waiting times for trains at midday, decreased night subway service and the closing of four subway stations at night.

Overnight service may be eliminated on 25 bus lines, weekend service may be eliminated on 41 bus routes and another 21 bus routes may lose all weekday service.

Earlier this week, the agency said a new payroll tax meant to shore up its finances brought in about 20 percent less than what the state forecast, resulting in a $200 million shortfall.

Jay Walder, the MTA's new chairman, is faced with closing a $340 million budget gap for next year. The deficit comes after New York State officials slashed transit funds by $143 million because of their own fiscal challenges.


In Astoria, Queens, which is serviced by the N/W train, straphangers said the existing subway service is already lacking.

"We wait long enough for our N/W train already. There are tons of people who live in this area and we need two trains," said one resident of Astoria, Queens.

"Twenty, 25 minutes just for the train to get here. End up being late for work if I don't leave early enough. And that's with the N and the W, so imagine with just one train," said another local.

"You would think that a competent agency would look for a train in an area with declining ridership. Astoria is perhaps the most vibrant, growing neighborhood in the entire city with one antiquated train line going in and out," said Queens Councilman Peter Vallone. "We need better service and more service, not service cuts."

The New York Times reports that Walder has ordered a 10-percent salary reduction for $6,000 non-union employees, including himself.

The New York Daily News reports the agency is thinking about ending free transit passes for city students.

The MTA is expected to unveil its full list of proposed service changes on Monday.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Dec 13, 2009 5:39 PM

WCBS-TV

Dec 13, 2009 11:41 am US/Eastern
MTA May Cut Free Student MetroCards To Save Budget


NEW YORK (CBS) The Metropolitan Transportation Agency may try to ease its budget woes by eliminating free MetroCards for students.

http://llnw.image.cbslocal.com/29/20...20x240/mta.jpg

The cash-strapped agency was reportedly considering a plan to charge students half fares in 2010 and full price in 2011.

Critics said the MTA shouldn't balance its budget at the expense of the City's students.

"Who in their right mind would suggest punishing children whose only crime is getting up in the morning and going to school?" said Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer.

Student travel funding once covered by the city and state was slashed in the mid-90's and until now, the MTA covered the balance of the discounted fare program.

Services cuts also were likely for New York City's public buses and subways after a court decision that supported wage raises for transit workers. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority lost its appeal of wage arbitration on Friday when a State Supreme Court judge ruled to support a 11.5 percent increase over three years for the Transit Workers Union.

The agency that runs buses, subways and suburban rail lines says wage hikes will add hundreds of millions of dollars to the budget.

An umbrella group for the City's unions said it welcomed the decision.

The MTA board was to meet Wednesday to pass an $11 billion budget for 2010 -- while trying to plug a $343 million budget gap.

The board has pledged not to raise fares, but is likely to cut service.

That decision was angering New York City residents. If certain bus routes are eliminated in this city, Ellie and her father would have to walk an extra five blocks to nursery school every morning in this bitter cold. "Learn how to manage your money ... like the rest of us," Cary Rosenwald said.

Even though the MTA got a state bailout it is still financially challenged. Two entire subway lines, the W and the Z, may be eliminated. Four subway stations would also be shuttered overnight on the Manhattan Broadway line at City Hall, Cortlandt and Rector Streets and also the Downtown Brooklyn Lawrence Street Station. On top of that, 21 bus routes in four boroughs would get the ax.

Among the 21 bus routes at risk is the M-30, which has a very loyal ridership.

"I'm not sure how I'd get to work. I'd have to take two or three different buses, walk an extra 10 blocks in the cold? It's the best bus actually," rider Charles Guadano said.

"I take it twice a week. It's a great bus for what it is," rider Rita Brand added.

As many as 25 other bus routes, including the M-79, may have overnight service from midnight to 4 a.m. eliminated.

When asked what he will do if that ends up being the case, Paul Rothstein said, "Take the East Side trains down and cross that way." He later added going that route will be a real hardship.

All the MTA spokesman would confirm was: "We still intend to stick to the fare increase schedule that doesn't include one in 2010."

That was the only bit or good news for an angry ridership.

According to an MTA spokesman, the agency's budget proposal does not at this time include any services cuts on Metro North or the Long Island Rail Road.




© MMIX, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Bootstrap Bill Dec 13, 2009 6:53 PM

According to Wikipedia, NYC MTA has 11,574,566 riders every week day, or 3,009,387,160 riders every year, not including weekends.

Quote:

$343 million budget gap

That works out to about $.11 per ride, or $.22 per day per person assuming an average of two trips per day.

If they raise the price of passes $5.00 and single ride fares $.11, they should have enough to make up the shortage.

NYonward Dec 14, 2009 7:00 PM

From NYMag's "Reasons to love NY 2009"


43. Because We Keep Digging


http://images.nymag.com/news/article...221_43_560.jpg
Beneath Second Avenue near 91st Street, December 3.
(Photo: Patrick J. Cashin/MTA)


You almost don’t want to say it, for fear of tempting fate, but it’s real. Conceived 80 years ago, funded and canceled twice, surviving even last year’s financial calamity, a subway line is creeping down Second Avenue. Yet even if you live with the construction noise and dust, the scale of the beast has been hidden. This photo, shot on December 3, brings it home. The cavern you see on these pages is four blocks long.

You’re looking at the south end, beneath East 91st Street. Begun in June, scheduled to be finished in February, the space will serve as the launch area for a huge tunnel-boring machine that will chew its way down to 63rd Street.
The workers at right are drilling holes and packing them with explosives, for further blasting. The crew at left is breaking up rock for removal. Underground work goes on 24 hours a day, seven days a week. As Con Ed used to say, “Dig we must.”

The first run of the T train, as it will be called, is way off, and the whole thing could still go to hell. Opening day has already been pushed back from 2015 to 2017. The budget (about a third from the Feds, the rest from the state) has edged up to $4.4 billion, and just last week the MTA announced yet another shortfall. In the seventies, we actually did quit midway, after three bits of tunnel were built for this line. But this time, even when the economy cratered, we kept at it—armed with bond issues, dynamite, and our abiding optimism.

Read more: Because We Keep Digging - Reasons to Love New York 2009 -- New York Magazine http://nymag.com/news/articles/reaso...#ixzz0ZguLrFwY

Bootstrap Bill Dec 15, 2009 4:38 AM

What's next after the Second Avenue line is built? Is this the end of the road for subway construction?

KVNBKLYN Dec 15, 2009 4:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4605363)
According to Wikipedia, NYC MTA has 11,574,566 riders every week day, or 3,009,387,160 riders every year, not including weekends.

That works out to about $.11 per ride, or $.22 per day per person assuming an average of two trips per day.

If they raise the price of passes $5.00 and single ride fares $.11, they should have enough to make up the shortage.

Um, no. According to the MTA, the agency provides 8,739,680 rides per weekday, but that includes the subway, city buses, two suburban railways and a suburban bus system. MTA NYC Transit, which is just the subway and city buses, provides 7,626,264 rides per weekday.

http://www.mta.info/mta/network.htm

NYonward Dec 15, 2009 1:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4607997)
What's next after the Second Avenue line is built? Is this the end of the road for subway construction?

"After" the T line is completed is a long way out. But it's not likely to be an end of subway construction, the metropolitan area keeps getting denser and there are areas that have grown far faster than the current subways can support (F and L lines for example). My guess is that there will be additions of stations every 10 to 15 years, and a major line constructed every 50-100 years.

But who knows, maybe there will be some major advancement in tunnel boring machines automating them even further that will cheapen and shorten the process. That would change things significantly.

Bootstrap Bill Dec 15, 2009 5:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KVNBKLYN (Post 4608012)
Um, no. According to the MTA, the agency provides 8,739,680 rides per weekday, but that includes the subway, city buses, two suburban railways and a suburban bus system. MTA NYC Transit, which is just the subway and city buses, provides 7,626,264 rides per weekday.

http://www.mta.info/mta/network.htm

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropo...rity_(New_York)

Quote:

Daily ridership 11,574,566 (weekday; all modes)[1][2][3][4]
(2007 figures)
If that's incorrect, would someone please update the Wikipedia page?

NYC4Life Dec 15, 2009 5:56 PM

NY1

Updated 11:14 AM
Doomsday Cuts Protested By Transit Advocates

http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/7596/30618905.jpg

Riders across the city are hitting the streets in protest today, one day before the Metropolitan Transportation Authority Board votes on proposed cuts to the system aimed at trimming its deficit.

Community leaders and high school students gathered this morning in front of Brooklyn's Maxwell High School, one of several protests planned throughout the city.

They were demonstrating against the MTA's proposal to a gradually phase-out the popular student discount MetroCard program, meaning more than half-a-million kids would have to pay full fares by 2011.


Students say if it goes through, they won't be able to afford getting to school.

"We already have hardship now in terms of the recession. Kids will drop out of school, they won't come to school,” said community advocate Kevin McCall. “They will hop the turnstiles, crime will go up."

"If they cut the school MetroCard, no child is coming to school,” said a student. “Do you know how much money parents have to pay a week for their child to go to school? And some parents don't even make that much money, so if they cut the MetroCard, nobody is going to be coming to school."

The MTA is also proposing several service cuts to bridge a $383 million budget gap.

The plan would eliminate the W and Z subway lines and dozens of bus routes, shorten the G and M lines, and reduce service during off-peak hours.

The service cuts would take effect next spring.

The agency is expected to pass the measure. NY1 will carry the vote live tomorrow morning, beginning at 9:30.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

miketoronto Dec 16, 2009 4:37 AM

Whatever, they will still go to school. In just about every other city, high-school students pay almost full regular fare to ride the transit to school.
On top of that, most NYC students can probably walk to school anyway.

American transit systems gave way too many concesssions to people that most other world systems do not. And this is partly the reason they are in budget problems and have such low cost recovery.

electricron Dec 16, 2009 4:59 AM

Why is always the folks getting a free ride that protest the most over fare increases?

Have they look at the alternative? I don't think they have......
So the kids can keep their free rides to school, the agency would have to increase the fares for their parents so they can get to work. Except the increase fares for the adults will need to equal what the fares for the kids would be, or to keep it simple, a doubling the adult fares.

That alternative would cause a riot.

KVNBKLYN Dec 16, 2009 3:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miketoronto (Post 4609682)
Whatever, they will still go to school. In just about every other city, high-school students pay almost full regular fare to ride the transit to school.
On top of that, most NYC students can probably walk to school anyway.

American transit systems gave way too many concesssions to people that most other world systems do not. And this is partly the reason they are in budget problems and have such low cost recovery.

Actually, no. Most American high school students have the option of taking a completely free (ie, government subsidized) school bus to school or to park in completely free (ie, government subsidized) student parking lots.

And very few NYC high school students live within walking distance of their high school. In NYC students apply to go to a high school and most try to get in to the top schools or the school that offers the specialized curriculum they're looking for, which is likely in another borough. Many high school students have hour long commutes each way. And even for those who go to their "local" school, it is quite often not within a 15-20 minute walk of their home.

It always amazes me that if you propose a congestion charge, you get a bunch of people screaming about how unfair it is to the poor, or why should I have to pay to use the streets to take my grandmother to the hospital, etc, etc. But the same people think that CHILDREN should have to pay $4.50 a day just to go to school by bus.

NYC4Life Dec 16, 2009 5:02 PM

BREAKING:

MTA Board approves measures for steep service cuts. More info to follow.

NYC4Life Dec 16, 2009 7:08 PM

WABC-TV

MTA approves 'Doomsday' budget plan
Updated at 12:33 PM today


NEW YORK (WABC) -- Faced with a shortfall of almost $400 million -- the MTA passed its Doomsday plan just before noon.

It includes massive cuts to bus and subway service.

And for those who are frustrated beyond words-- the MTA chairman made it clear this morning-- you're not alone.

Despite all the protests, the board has voted unanimously to approve drastic service cuts, and now the Doomsday budget is one step closer to becoming a reality.

The drastic service cuts will be felt from top to bottom at the MTA.

Not only will the cuts impact bus and subway service passengers, but also many white-collar jobs in the agency are now on the line.

"We need to rethink every aspect of our operation. We need to permanently reduce the cost of what we're doing. To ensure it, we need to take the place apart," said MTA Chairman, Jay Walder.

The new budget would end the W and Z subway lines, cut 21 bus routes, reduce frequency for off-peak trains, Access-a-Ride for seniors & disabled and end discounts for students.

"We in this city have been ambushed by the MTA by the quick of their vote today," NYC Councilman (D), James Vacca said.

Even before the MTA met, city council members to condemn the plan of ending the free metrocards for New York City students.

Especially since this whole idea came without much warning.

"This is a completely undemocratic process," NYC Council Speaker, Christine Quinn said.

This doomsday budget scenario will have a devastating impact on the 585,000 who had free or discounted metrocards.

"We cannot balance the MTA's budget on the backs of our children and our disabled. That is not the right thing to do," said NYC Councilwoman (D), Jessica Lappin.

The chairman of the board says this is just the beginning of the process, not the end.

Of course, the state and the governor could come in and try to help eliminate some of the problems that the MTA is currently going through.

Meanwhile, there will still be hearings on the MTA's plan of eliminating the free metrocards given to students in the New York City school system.



(Copyright ©2009 WABC-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)

electricron Dec 16, 2009 8:42 PM

I not fully aware how New York City schools work, but out here in the rest of the county, school boards with school taxes fund the operation of school buses, not city transit taxes.
How much does the New York City schools help fund the free rides to school?
None? Partial? Fully?

penfold Dec 17, 2009 2:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electricron (Post 4610632)
I not fully aware how New York City schools work, but out here in the rest of the county, school boards with school taxes fund the operation of school buses, not city transit taxes.
How much does the New York City schools help fund the free rides to school?
None? Partial? Fully?

At one point the city paid most of it, but Giuliani threatened to cut funding in the 90s. After a very public fight, the state, the city, and the MTA all agreed to chip in a third each. Unfortunately, the state and the city set the exact amount they would pay, so as school enrollment increased, the MTA has had to pick up a larger share. The state eventually pulled out most of its funding as well, so MTA has been using the kids as a bargaining chip to get some of that funding (which in most cities would never be taken out of a transit budget) restored.

alexjon Dec 17, 2009 4:00 PM

http://secondavenuesagas.com/2009/12...etrocard-cuts/

KVNBKLYN Dec 21, 2009 9:54 PM

A further update on the 7 train extension: It seems they've finished boring the tunnels south of the Javits station and in the spring will finish the tunnels north from the station to the end of the existing 7 line. I guess this thing's getting built - and without the much-needed 10th Avenue station.

By comparison, tunnel boring for the Second Avenue subway hasn't even begun. They're not even finished with the launch box where the tunnel boring machine will begin its journey.

From nyc.gov:

Quote:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
PR- 544-09
December 21, 2009

MAYOR BLOOMBERG AND MTA ANNOUNCE COMPLETION OF FIRST PHASE OF NUMBER 7 SUBWAY EXTENSION

1,000-Ton Tunnel Boring Machine Breaks Through the 34th Street Station Cavern Wall, Completing Train Storage Section between 26th Street and 34th Street along 11th Avenue

City-funded $2.1 Billion Infrastructure Project is First Subway Expansion in Decades

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Deputy Mayor for Economic Development Robert C. Lieber and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman and CEO Jay H. Walder today announced the completion of the first phase of the Number 7 subway extension at the Hudson Yards in Manhattan. The second of two tunnel boring machines has reached the southern wall of the 34th Street Station cavern after mining a combined 2,900 feet from their starting point at 26th Street under 11th Avenue. The $2.1 billion project, funded by the City and managed by the MTA, will help transform the Hudson Yards vicinity into a vibrant 24-hour neighborhood, containing a mix of commercial, residential, retail, open space and recreational uses. In January of 2005, the City Council approved the Bloomberg Administration's plan for re-zoning the Hudson Yards area, including the Eastern Rail Yards. Today, the City Council will vote on the plan for the Western Rail Yards, which would complete the public approvals process for the development of the area[...]

[...]The tunnel boring machines were launched last summer from the underground assembly chamber located at 26th Street. The first 300 feet of tunneling was complicated by a section of soft ground between 27th and 28th Streets that required a technique called "ground freeze" to reinforce the ground, allowing the machines to pass through as if it were solid rock. As the tunnel boring machines mine, they place pre-cast concrete lining rings along the excavated tunnel, making up the permanent liner of the finished tunnel. While the new service will terminate at the new 34th Street station, the tunnels continue to 25th Street to allow for the storage of trains.

One tunnel boring machine has already started mining north of the station cavern toward 42nd Street while the other is being pulled through the cavern and will begin mining in a few weeks. Tunneling north from 34th Street also presents unique challenges, as track will run under the 8th Avenue Subway, Amtrak/NJ TRANSIT tunnels, tunnels to the former New York Central Line, the Lincoln Tunnel and the Port Authority Bus Terminal and ramps. Excavation and underpinning of the 8th Avenue Subway line is underway to allow the new tunnels to tie into the existing 7 Line tail tracks at Times Square.

Tunneling will be completed in the Spring of 2010, when work will commence on station entrances and finishes, as well as support facilities such as ventilation and traction power substations. The new service will open in December in 2013 as scheduled[...]
http://www.nyc.gov/html/om/gif/2009/pr544-09_4.jpg

More photos here: http://www.nyc.gov/portal/site/nycgo...&rc=1194&ndi=1

NYC4Life Dec 25, 2009 7:17 PM

NY1

12/25/2009 10:11 AM
MTA Unveils Countdown Clocks At Bronx Subway Stations
By: NY1 News

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/2203/33104679.jpg

Straphangers in the Bronx only have to look up to find out when the next train will arrive.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is testing countdown clocks in five subway stations along the Number 6 line.

The clocks show the number of minutes until the next train arrives, as well as real-time messages about delays and other transit information.

Passengers said they are enthusiastic about the pilot program.

"It lets us know when it's coming in and I think overall it's going to help,” said one straphanger.

"They're beautiful. I like them because they help me. They help me out so I know exactly when the train's coming,” added another.

"I think it's great because I don't have to step to the edge anymore. That's a little dangerous,” said a third.

The MTA hopes to have the clocks installed in 152 stations by early 2011.




Copyright © 2009 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Jan 6, 2010 5:20 AM

NY1

Updated 4:39 PM
Brooklyn LIRR Terminal Opens
By: Roger Clark

http://img683.imageshack.us/img683/9310/74663532.jpg

After six years of construction, the Long Island Rail Road's new Atlantic Terminal Pavilion opened in Brooklyn Tuesday.

The three-story limestone, granite and glass structure at Flatbush Avenue and Hanson Place, which cost $108 million to build, features new amenities, including a customer waiting area, ticket offices and restrooms.

The existing transit hub connects the LIRR to five bus lines and 10 subway lines – the B, D, M, N, Q, R, 2, 3, 4 and 5 trains. About 57,000 commuters come through the station daily.


"[Whoever uses] it to enter the system, to come through the soaring atrium that we have here, will see natural light brought into our subterranean system," said Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman and CEO Jay Walder.

The station is located in a bustling area that includes the $4.9 billion Atlantic Yards project, with its arena for the Nets basketball team as well as other residential and commercial buildings.

http://media.ny1.com/media/2010/1/5/.../01LIRR_Bk.jpg

Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz said the new pavilion will attract more people to Brooklyn.

"The beauty of it is now is that folks that live in 'Brooklyn Near East,' also known as Nassau, and 'Brooklyn Far East,' also known as Suffolk, easily they can get right to Brooklyn, get out here on Atlantic Avenue at the LIRR station and within walking distance, they don't have to take cabs, they don't have to take buses, within walking distance of this terminal they'll be able to enjoy all the great amenities of Downtown Brooklyn," he said.

The place already received positive reviews from commuters.

"It looks good. It looks real good, the ceiling and all. It's real nice," said a New Yorker.

"Very different from before. It's open, beautiful, very comfortable," said another.

"I think it's fabulous. They did a great job, they really did, it's great," said a third.

The station's architect is a Brooklyn native who attended nearby Brooklyn Tech High School.




Copyright © 2010 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Jan 12, 2010 7:25 PM

NY1

01/11/2010 10:09 AM
Thousands Take To The Subway Without Pants
By: NY1 News

http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/8393/87022195.jpg

Thousands of people in the subway stripped down to their underway yesterday as part of the annual No Pants Subway Ride.

Ignoring the cold, riders met at six different locations in Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn – and were assigned stations to drop their pants.

Participants were encouraged to just act natural.

The group Improv Everywhere is behind the annual event.

Organizers say the goal is make other riders smile.




Copyright © 2010 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Jan 12, 2010 7:28 PM

NY1

01/12/2010 09:47 AM
Acela Trains To Get Wi-Fi
By: NY1 News

http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/4270/30342805.jpg

Amtrak's high-speed Acela trains will soon have high-speed Internet.

The railroad plans to offer free Wi-Fi on its Acela trains beginning in March.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Acela service that connects New York to Washington, Philadelphia and Boston.

Amtrak also says this year it will complete upgrades to Acela car interiors, including the addition of leather seats.




Copyright © 2010 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Jan 12, 2010 7:33 PM

01/12/2010 01:54 PM
MTA To Replace Rubbing Boards At Two Midtown Stations
By: NY1 News

http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/1019/83971594.jpg

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority says it's working to replace some of the subway platform edges that are damaged in two Midtown stations.

The rubbing boards are painted yellow and are used to keep the trains from rubbing against the concrete platform. Some riders have complained that at several locations, the boards are rotting and shaky, presenting a safety hazard.

An MTA spokesman says the agency has been working to install new fiberglass boards, which are more durable.

Problem platforms include the B/V/D, N/R/Q/W and downtown F at Herald Square and the uptown B/D at Rockefeller Center.

The MTA is reminding customers to stay away from the platform edges, as they are meant for the subway cars.




Copyright © 2010 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

NYC4Life Jan 12, 2010 7:36 PM

NY1

Updated 11:52 AM
MTA To Spare Three Bus Routes
By: NY1 News

http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/2700/73270904.jpg

Some local bus routes are being spared the ax, as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority adjusts its budget reduction plan.

Sources tell NY1 the MTA may keep running the Bx34 in Woodlawn, the Bx10 in Riverdale and Norwood, and the B25 in East New York, Fort Greene and Brooklyn Heights.

All three were slated for elimination as part of the MTA's doomsday budget, passed in an effort to close a nearly $400 million deficit.

B25 riders said they hope the bus stays on the road.

"I think it's a popular route,” said one resident. “I think a lot of people rely on that route, and I think it would be a hardship for a lot of people if it was eliminated.”

“Covers a lot of territory in Brooklyn, and there are a lot of elderly people who ride that bus. They can't take the A train, so why would they stop it?" said another. "I'm hoping and praying they continue the line."

The B25 is the only bus that services Brooklyn Bridge Park, which is scheduled to open this year following a massive renovation project.

The news is not all positive though, since cuts to reduce the deficit have to come from somewhere.

There are 21 bus routes slated for elimination.

Sources tell NY1 that more express bus routes, which mostly run between Staten Island and Manhattan and are more expensive to operate, will likely be eliminated.

As far as subway cuts, the MTA is considering eliminating the W and Z trains.

And, sources say a plan to replace the M line with the V is under serious consideration.



Copyright © 2010 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

KVNBKLYN Jan 12, 2010 11:26 PM

In contrast to the 7 train extension, where the TBMs are quickly completing the new tunnels (see earlier post above), the launch box for the TBMs for the Second Avenue Subway hasn't even been fully excavated.

From http://thelaunchbox.blogspot.com/:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_tjgTAe0iBh...ndAve_5055.jpg

KVNBKLYN Jan 12, 2010 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYC4Life (Post 4646731)

And, sources say a plan to replace the M line with the V is under serious consideration.

One bit of good news buried in a bunch of service cuts. Combining the M and V trains through the currently unused Christie Street Connection would make a lot of sense. It would provide a one-seat ride for people in Williamsburg, Bushwick and Ridgewood to Midtown, the largest destination for work trips. And in so doing, it might lure some riders away from the parallel and overcrowded L train. And because the V and M trains already run along these routes, it wouldn't require a penny of additional operating costs to run.

NYC4Life Jan 13, 2010 1:40 AM

Can a moderator please add the yellow smiley on this thread that is used on the other NYC threads??

I strongly feel this thread hardly gets any attention, considering NYC has the largest and most extensive mass transit system in the world.


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