SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   Transportation (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=25)
-   -   New York City - Transit News (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=154524)

scalziand Jan 21, 2019 6:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 8408729)
^ The comments in the SecondAveSagas write-up of this point out the shameful and absurd omission of the L shutdown of not taking the once-in-a-generation opportunity to extend the tunnel and tail tracks west past Eighth Ave, at a minimum to allow faster entry into 8th Ave Station and rush train storage to address ever growing ridership, but to get one step closer to eventual extension west or turning north to the UWS. Only in America and NYC would such lack of foresight (and competance and ambition) be possible.

Shoot, the 7 should have extended down to the L since the tail tracks for the 7 already extend to 25th street. If they just pushed it another 10 blocks it would have been there and massively enhanced connectivity, even if they didn't add anymore expensive stations.

Busy Bee Jan 21, 2019 7:22 PM

Maybe in an agency/city/state/country with it's head screwed on correctly.

mrnyc Jan 22, 2019 11:28 PM

boomba! mta and amtrak reach agreement for four new stations in east bronx and mnrr service to penn via the hellgate bridge and east side access. it moves to the design phase soon:

https://pix11.com/2019/01/22/mta-rea...n-project/amp/

mrnyc Jan 23, 2019 11:06 AM

nj gov murphy wants the pa to bump up replacing the newark airport airtrain. it opened in 1996 with a lifespan of 25yrs.

estimated cost is $2.1B — only maintenance was in the pa’s 10yr plan:

https://www.nj.com/politics/2019/01/...outputType=amp

BrownTown Jan 23, 2019 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrnyc (Post 8446188)
nj gov murphy wants the pa to bump up replacing the newark airport airtrain. it opened in 1996 with a lifespan of 25yrs.

estimated cost is $2.1B — only maintenance was in the pa’s 10yr plan:

https://www.nj.com/politics/2019/01/...outputType=amp

Ugh, NYC transit just never ceases to amaze me with its insane costs. How does that dinky little airtrain possibly cost $2,100,000,000 to replace?

mrnyc Jan 29, 2019 10:42 PM

the endless never to be settled nyc issue — who owns the streets? pedestrians? cars?

or ... the state?

https://nypost.com/2019/01/28/cuomos...s-streets/amp/

chris08876 Jan 29, 2019 11:00 PM

Either way, folks will be screwed. Taking the roads? More tolls and congestion pricing factored in with expensive parking and ticket maids that come out of the woodwork and give you a ticket in some far flug neighborhood in Queens for parking at 10:59 am when parking is allowed at 11:00 am-5pm). Not to mention perma road construction wiping out lanes, and always during rush hour).

Taking the subway? Very crowded, and the convenient MTA price hike for absolutely no improvement to the transit system.

Its all talk, no action among the transit officials.

WhatTheHeck5205 Feb 6, 2019 9:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scalziand (Post 8444156)
Shoot, the 7 should have extended down to the L since the tail tracks for the 7 already extend to 25th street. If they just pushed it another 10 blocks it would have been there and massively enhanced connectivity, even if they didn't add anymore expensive stations.

I wish they could do something like this, because Hudson Yards is way too huge a development for that one 7 train station. The problem is that the numbered lines and the lettered ones were built by two different railroad companies (the IRT and BMT), and although the gauge of the rails is the same, the actual bodies of the train cars used on the L are something like 10ft longer and over a foot wider than the ones on the 7, and physically can’t fit in the same tunnels. So you’re faced with having to either completely rebuild the 7 line to accommodate the larger BMT trains (which would probably take over a century knowing the MTA), or operate the combined line with the smaller IRT trains, and reduced capacity as a result (not to mention a huge gap between the train and the platform, unless every station on the L was renovated). It was incredibly shortsighted for city not to require the two companies to standardize the size of their train cars.

Also chris08876, you do know that the congestion pricing revenue is earmarked specifically for subway repairs, right?

Busy Bee Feb 6, 2019 9:41 PM

Nobody is talking about interlining the L with the 7. What is a possibility though is connecting the L terminus with the 7 tail tracks south of Hudson Yards, creating the opportunity of terminating the L at Hudson Yards. There is one other instance of the IRT sharing a station platform with the BMT/IND and that is Queensboro Plaza. That cross platform interaction obviously is not a terminal for either division, so the logistics of terminating the L at HY would be challenging. It would perhaps require significant modifications or even a seperate station just to the south of the HY station connected by passageway. Of course this begs the question, what is easier?... Running the 7 southward on the current non-revenue tail tracks with extension to 14th St or extending the L through a new connector to the 7 tail tracks up to a terminal at HY? My personal feeling is that an extended L would have more utility (considering Queens patrons could take the E to 14 St and current access to the west side from north Brooklyn is limited) but come at a higher cost due to afformentioned modifications to the current station layout, but a southward 7 connected to 8 Av/14 St L requiring it's own station terminal would be equally expensive, so perhaps it's a wash.

BrownTown Feb 6, 2019 9:50 PM

I'll be interested to see exactly how busy the Hudson Yards station is once these towers open. Right now it's virtually a ghost town.

C. Feb 6, 2019 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrownTown (Post 8463697)
I'll be interested to see exactly how busy the Hudson Yards station is once these towers open. Right now it's virtually a ghost town.

It's overengineered in my opinion. Way too deep. I wish cut/cover subway construction would make a comeback.

mrnyc Feb 11, 2019 6:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 8463689)
Nobody is talking about interlining the L with the 7. What is a possibility though is connecting the L terminus with the 7 tail tracks south of Hudson Yards, creating the opportunity of terminating the L at Hudson Yards. There is one other instance of the IRT sharing a station platform with the BMT/IND and that is Queensboro Plaza. That cross platform interaction obviously is not a terminal for either division, so the logistics of terminating the L at HY would be challenging. It would perhaps require significant modifications or even a seperate station just to the south of the HY station connected by passageway. Of course this begs the question, what is easier?... Running the 7 southward on the current non-revenue tail tracks with extension to 14th St or extending the L through a new connector to the 7 tail tracks up to a terminal at HY? My personal feeling is that an extended L would have more utility (considering Queens patrons could take the E to 14 St and current access to the west side from north Brooklyn is limited) but come at a higher cost due to afformentioned modifications to the current station layout, but a southward 7 connected to 8 Av/14 St L requiring it's own station terminal would be equally expensive, so perhaps it's a wash.


the thought was there. sorta. the hy 7 train launch box site is on 11th ave between w25th-w26th st.

thats a good five blocks south of the new hy station.

so yeah i can see bringing the 7 train down to 10av/w23rd st. and then 10av/w14st.

then tunneling the L train further west a bit from 8av to 10av to hook up to it.

it would be expensive, but it would really improve westside connectivity and nicely set up for a subway leap over to new jersey someday.

Busy Bee Feb 11, 2019 7:17 PM

^ Agreed

M II A II R II K Feb 11, 2019 7:50 PM

Subway cars with new, open-gangway design to arrive in 2020

https://www.amny.com/transit/new-subway-cars-1.26287915

https://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/..._768/image.jpg

Busy Bee Feb 11, 2019 8:42 PM

Not news, but...

1) Love the restyled cab end with LED route bullets and slick headlights.

2) Hate the ridiculous Cuomo paint jobs. So stupid. Painting (or wrapping) the doors in blue or yellow would've been cool, and also kind of a neat throwback to the R-32 when they were new, but that lame gradient and stripe thing is just guhh.

chris08876 Feb 12, 2019 4:05 PM

Clean, On Time and Rat-Free: 9 International Transit Systems With Lessons for New York: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/11/r...gtype=Homepage

Too long to post.

mrnyc Feb 14, 2019 6:16 PM

more wishy-washy with the L train fiasco:


MTA details 'disruptive' L train rehabilitation plan, but questions remain

More service will be added to 7, G and M lines but it's unclear what will happen to street-level plans that were drafted for a full L shutdown.


By Vincent Barone

Updated February 13, 2019 6:18 PM


L train rehabilitation work will still be "disruptive," even as a full shutdown is avoided, the MTA said on Wednesday.

As the authority rehabilitates the Sandy-damaged Canarsie tunnel, it will be reducing L train service to 20-minute waits on weeknights and weekends — from Bedford Avenue through Manhattan — with reductions in service beginning as early as 8 p.m. on weeknights. Twenty-minute headways will kick in around 10 p.m. on weeknights and run through 5 a.m.

“We’ll be able to maintain service, but it will be a disruptive service on the L,” said MTA managing director Ronnie Hakim, who briefed reporters over the phone.



more:
https://www.amny.com/transit/l-train-plans-1.27266740

chris08876 Feb 15, 2019 12:27 AM

De Blasio once again rebukes congestion pricing: He said he has “not yet seen a plan that I could support”

Quote:

Mayor Bill de Blasio has, once again, signaled that he does not support congestion pricing, which has recently gained momentum as a way to fund New York City’s ailing subway system.

During a budget hearing in Albany yesterday, de Blasio told state lawmakers that “I have not yet seen a plan that I could support but I remain open to new versions,” according to the Wall Street Journal. He did, however, express support for “hardship exemptions” in a congestion pricing plan, which would provide carve-outs for people with medical expenses, for example.

The mayor’s support for congestion pricing has long been nonexistent, even as a diverse coalition of supporters—including transit advocates, anti-poverty activists, city officials, and even Gov. Andrew Cuomo—have pushed for the plan as a way of funding subway repairs. In 2017, de Blasio said he “does not believe” in congestion pricing, and later called it a “regressive tax.”

As Cuomo has pushed for adopting a plan (the details of which have not yet been made clear), most recently in his State of the State address, de Blasio’s support has warmed up to merely tepid at best.

Per the WSJ, de Blasio prefers that a funding “cocktail” be used for subway fixes—he’s still pushing a millionaires’ tax on the city’s highest earners, a move that Cuomo steadfastly does not support.
=================
NYCurbed

plutonicpanda Feb 15, 2019 3:22 AM

Huge no on any congestion pricing. It does NOT work and only prices out the poor.

It's ever worse they propose money spent directly from car motorist paying to drive to fund mass transit. Just a preposterous idea all around. Hell, I'm 100 percent against tolling a single interstate including 3di's and I'd go for that before congestion pricing. Sheesh!

Nouvellecosse Feb 15, 2019 4:10 AM

The poor get around by driving and parking their cars in Manhattan?


All times are GMT. The time now is 2:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.