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-   -   CHICAGO: Transit Developments (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=101657)

M II A II R II K Jul 30, 2010 1:17 AM

Congestion Pricing Coming to Chicago?


http://thecityfix.com/congestion-pri...ng-to-chicago/

http://www.metroplanning.org/uploads...ort_7.8.10.pdf

Quote:

Congestion pricing is looking more likely in Chicago. After all, as transport experts have been pointing out for years: ”Congestion pricing is about the only weapon we have in our arsenal to encourage more efficient use of our expressways [and tollways].”

- Recent analysis of Chicago’s transit system gives cause for greater optimism among congestion-pricing advocates. Chicago has the third-worst traffic congestion in the country. Now, a federally-funded study by the Metropolitan Planning Council (MPC) and the Illinois Tollway says it’s time for Chicagoland to implement congestion pricing. The study notes that congestion pricing is already working in places like London, and on other modes of transport: for instance, flights get more expensive around holidays.



Inbound traffic on Chicago's Kennedy Expressway on July 9, 2010. A new study has suggested Chicago adopt congestion pricing to cut down on wasteful driving. Photo via the Chicago Tribune.

http://thecityfix.com/files/2010/07/transitchicago.jpg

Mr Downtown Jul 30, 2010 1:45 AM

Metra Ravenswood Station not moving
 
From the Chicago Tribune:

Residents on Ravenswood Avenue were so upset by the idea of a Metra station closer to their homes that they complained to officials, circulated a petition, formed an association and hired an attorney.

Their efforts seem to have worked.

Metra officials and the area's alderman have backed away from a plan to move the Metra's busy Ravenswood station north of Lawrence Avenue from its current location south of the street.

On Wednesday, Metra spokesman Michael Gillis said Metra, in consultation with Ald. Gene Schulter, 47th, had decided to build the new station on the same site as it sits now.

Link to story

nergie Jul 30, 2010 1:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Downtown (Post 4929881)
From the Chicago Tribune:

Residents on Ravenswood Avenue were so upset by the idea of a Metra station closer to their homes that they complained to officials, circulated a petition, formed an association and hired an attorney.

Their efforts seem to have worked.

Metra officials and the area's alderman have backed away from a plan to move the Metra's busy Ravenswood station north of Lawrence Avenue from its current location south of the street.

On Wednesday, Metra spokesman Michael Gillis said Metra, in consultation with Ald. Gene Schulter, 47th, had decided to build the new station on the same site as it sits now.

Link to story

My favorite line "Had we known we wouldn't have bought". This is the fucking mindset of NIMBYS that I don't get. A healthy city is dynamic by nature, I wonder how people felt when they built this idiot's building. Sheesh no wonder why this country is lagging and it is the 'me' first attitude. :hell:

jpIllInoIs Jul 30, 2010 1:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nergie (Post 4930264)
My favorite line "Had we known we wouldn't have bought". This is the fucking mindset of NIMBYS that I don't get. A healthy city is dynamic by nature, I wonder how people felt when they built this idiot's building. Sheesh no wonder why this country is lagging and it is the 'me' first attitude. :hell:

Yes and it indicates the the "Nanny State" mind set is alive and well even in a well to do neighborhood. The thinking is that somehow "Someone should have warned me that (list your objection here) would be built during (list your time frame here) and that if (list your exaggerated catastrophe here)our home values would go down and what about the children?"

nergie Jul 30, 2010 2:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jpIllInoIs (Post 4930284)
Yes and it indicates the the "Nanny State" mind set is alive and well even in a well to do neighborhood. The thinking is that somehow "Someone should have warned me that (list your objection here) would be built during (list your time frame here) and that if (list your exaggerated catastrophe here)our home values would go down and what about the children?"

This guy's name seems to crop up more than it should, would love to turn the tables on him. His sniveling attitude makes me sick, they want all amnenities but don't want any of the sacrafice. Is is slander to write an op-ed piece on him and his stupid bunch of whinos.

VivaLFuego Jul 30, 2010 3:34 PM

Good deal --- I wonder how much money has thus been wasted on unnecessary A/D/E work, and how much extra construction will cost because of added difficulty in staging.

It's only money, and there's plenty of that going around.

elguero Jul 30, 2010 5:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VivaLFuego (Post 4930372)
Good deal --- I wonder how much money has thus been wasted on unnecessary A/D/E work, and how much extra construction will cost because of added difficulty in staging.

It's only money, and there's plenty of that going around.


Definitely wonder on how much the whole mess will cost. And I don't see a station across the street as opposed to a block down dramatically changes the reality that the man quoted decided to build his house in the middle of the city across from a rather active rail line. I'd also assume there was at least some sort of public discourse on moving the location of the station in initial planning stages where these sort of issues should have come to light in the first place, even if we see them as ridiculous.

That said, I'm curious about the decision to move the station to begin with--I assume it is partly a simple matter of preventing any station closures/work on an active station, but is there more to it than that? moving a station one block isn't going to really change its accessibility, no? Closer to some, farther for others, and is a one block difference either way really going to change an appreciable people's mind on riding the train? Perhaps formal analysis says yes; from a common sense perspective seems unlikely though.

VivaLFuego Jul 30, 2010 5:38 PM

In general, it's simply far cheaper if you can avoid very complex staging in rebuilding an active facility in a constrained space (e.g. the enormously expensive Grand/State reconstruction). I don't think there is any compelling service planning or operational reasoning for either a northside or southside station location.

jpIllInoIs Jul 30, 2010 8:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nergie (Post 4930327)
This guy's name seems to crop up more than it should, would love to turn the tables on him. His sniveling attitude makes me sick, they want all amnenities but don't want any of the sacrafice. Is is slander to write an op-ed piece on him and his stupid bunch of whinos.

I assume you are referring to the Ravenswood Neighborhood Association group. Almost as bad as the West Loop outfit. What would they have said if Metra decided to move the station 8 blocks south to Irving Park with the intent of improving inter-modal routing?

Baronvonellis Jul 30, 2010 8:53 PM

They are the same ones that complained when they wanted to develop the sears parking lot area. Gee, what does he expect when he moved to an area next to a train stop and one of the largest development sites on the north side. He should of just built his house in Winnetka.

denizen467 Jul 31, 2010 7:37 AM

Is there anything suspicious about the speed with which this 180 degree change occurred -- under 30 days (from Epstein finding out about the plan on 6/29). It's almost like Metra wanted to go with the southern platform, but needed an excuse to go with the more expensive option.

One complaint, brief involvement of the Alderman, and then poof - Metra's plans flip around.

Mr Downtown Jul 31, 2010 6:58 PM

Much more curious, in my opinion, is the sudden appearance out of nowhere of the desperate need to rebuild the station, coupled with the alderman's insistence that the meetings about the development north of Lawrence could not discuss the location of the Metra station. Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government, and lurching from wishlist item to TIGER application to sham public hearing is no way to do long-range planning, capital investment programming, or neighborhood redevelopment.

denizen467 Jul 31, 2010 8:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Downtown (Post 4931629)
Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government

What do you prefer, an anarcho-syndicalist commune? ;)

At least we have the Lady of the Lake, er, "Daley of the Lake", distributin' chits...


(Alright, don't read too much into that.)

VivaLFuego Aug 1, 2010 5:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Downtown (Post 4931629)
Much more curious, in my opinion, is the sudden appearance out of nowhere of the desperate need to rebuild the station, coupled with the alderman's insistence that the meetings about the development north of Lawrence could not discuss the location of the Metra station. Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government, and lurching from wishlist item to TIGER application to sham public hearing is no way to do long-range planning, capital investment programming, or neighborhood redevelopment.

Wait a second, you mean there's another away to plan infrastructure development and renewal?

In fairness, among all non-downtown Metra stations, based on ridership alone Ravenswood would be near the top of the list for substantial investment to improve accessibility (for full ADA compliance) and lengthen platforms so all cars can serve the station. Granted, on a commuter railroad, even a relatively busy station isn't an "urgent" capital need on the same order as say, structure and vehicle replacement, unless the feds and disability-rights-groups have been applying the regulatory hammer towards Metra as hard as they've been on CTA lately.

jpIllInoIs Aug 4, 2010 12:07 AM

CREATE 75th Street Corridor Improvement Project
 
75th Street Capital Improvement Project website

All you infrastructure-train-urbanist can get some satisfaction nawing on this bone.

OhioGuy Aug 4, 2010 1:40 AM

Has there been any legitimate studies done on the possibility of adding a station to the green line between Roosevelt and I-55? With all of the condo development that's occurred in that area, I would think a new station might be warranted? It would seem as though a station on the south side of 18th street, just past the orange line junction, might be a good spot. Placing it further north would make it too close to Roosevelt, while placing it further south would lead somewhat to overlap with the Cermak red line station a couple blocks further west/west-southwest.

ardecila Aug 4, 2010 5:59 AM

There are definite plans to add a station at Cermak, although some have called for an different or additional location at 18th. Ald. Fioretti is in support of this, and TIF budgets have set aside future tax receipts for the station.

A Cermak station overlaps the Chinatown station in theory, but in reality the double whammy of the Rock Island tracks and the Ickes Homes have really separated Chinatown from areas further east. A Cermak station would also allow for easy bus transfers and have a quick walk to McCormick Place.

jpIllInoIs Aug 4, 2010 12:19 PM

City of Chicago Testing PolyBrite International’s New Borealis LED Streetlights
 
Story Link


PolyBrite International Inc., developer of the Borealis brand light emitting diode (LED) Lighting Systems, announced that the city of Chicago has installed new Borealis LED streetlights as part of a test pilot program. The City of Chicago will monitor the LED streetlights, weighed against their current lighting solution for streets and alleyways. The goal is for a safer, cleaner and brighter light that will improve nighttime safety and the overall appearance of the city.

Borealis LED streetlights have been installed and will be monitored for three months on the block of 4800 W. Parker Avenue in Chicago, IL. The city will be testing the LED streetlights for high color rendition to assure adequate vision, and greater control of light dispersion and energy savings. Currently, most of the city’s streets are illuminated with High Pressure Sodium (HPS) streetlights. HPS lights are used primarily because of their long rated life relative to other conventional options, but HPS street lighting has a very low color rendition, hindering visibility at night.

“We continue our efforts in assisting communities and cities everywhere with innovative ways to reduce their lighting concerns and their carbon footprint on the world,” said Carl Scianna, president and CEO of PolyBrite International. Mr. Scianna also noted that, “Borealis LED streetlights have a very high color rendition and consume a remarkable average of 60% less energy than the HPS streetlights. We appreciate the city’s study and their commitment to a clean, bright and safe lighting solution for their city streets.”

Borealis LED streetlights have a longer life, up to 50,000 hours, compared to the HPS life span of 20,000 hours. In addition to reduced maintenance, Borealis LED streetlights have a very high color rendition and produce a sharp, pure color without glare. They feature an instant “on” with no cold starting compared to HPS street lights, which typically take several minutes to achieve full brightness. PolyBrite’s patented LED technology, used in all Borealis lamps and lighting systems, will reduce the city’s operating costs, including lower energy usage and reduced maintenance and bulb replacement.

Motion sensors and lighting controls can also be used with Borealis LED lighting since they can be turned on and off instantly. Furthermore, Borealis LED streetlights are better equipped to withstand extreme hot and cold temperatures and provide more control over what is illuminated, thus reducing light pollution, making it an ideal solution for public lighting applications.

Busy Bee Aug 4, 2010 2:45 PM

I've love to see the dreadful yellow sodium vapor go the way of the dodo. Do we know where the test poles are? I'd really like to see a pic.

jpIllInoIs Aug 4, 2010 6:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 4935001)
I've love to see the dreadful yellow sodium vapor go the way of the dodo. Do we know where the test poles are? I'd really like to see a pic.

"Borealis LED streetlights have been installed and will be monitored for three months on the block of 4800 W. Parker Avenue in Chicago, IL"


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