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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

montréaliste Mar 25, 2020 4:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8873419)
I don't think that's the analogy. The point is to save as many lives as possible, not to reach some equilibrium of deaths.

But we'll know if that's true very shortly, as the rate is no longer exponentially increasing in the U.S., therefore calls should increase for normalization in the coming days, as long as deaths are stable.



Love your argument about cars being more deadly than this virus.

Had you been around in the sixties, your argument about lack of car safety would likely have been;

- "So what, tobacco is bad for you, I can't imagine the Gummint outlawing smoking in public, likewise, people die from bad car design, what can we do about it?

When you have heroes (in my book) like Ralph Nader who are disparaged for wearing the same pair of shoes for forty years by the media, called out for being a commie when they confront Big Industry, then, you deserve what you get...


So, get back to normal, duh.

Crawford Mar 25, 2020 4:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by montréaliste (Post 8873517)
Love your argument about cars being more deadly than this virus.

That isn't my argument. Read the conversation thread.

montréaliste Mar 25, 2020 4:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8873520)
That isn't my argument. Read the conversation thread.

You sound like Chump. Fake noose.

iheartthed Mar 25, 2020 4:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8873515)
It just occurred to me; are people who are doing this right now in relation to the pandemic, in the bargaining stage of grief? Still trying to convince themselves that things would get better soon if only business restrictions were eased?

This has been a serious disruption in all of our lives; I really think people are going through some form of grief. Just a thought.

Probably. They also had some help from officials that seemed to try to minimize the public health threat by emphasizing that older people are more susceptible. That undermined the point that nobody should assume they will have an uncomplicated experience if they contract covid-19. I have indirect connections to two people who have died so far that were supposed to be in the least risky group. I've never heard of anybody in my personal network dying from the flu.

subterranean Mar 25, 2020 4:58 PM

Ya'll are being quarantined in this thread. We will now require your avatar to be a picture of your actual face and you must change your username to your real first, middle, last name.

Crawford Mar 25, 2020 5:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8873532)
I have indirect connections to two people who have died so far that were supposed to be in the least risky group. I've never heard of anybody in my personal network dying from the flu.

Given that 80k people in the U.S. died in last year's flu, and about 600 in the U.S. died so far from Covid-19, this is not a good cost-benefit argument, at all.

iheartthed Mar 25, 2020 5:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8873541)
Given that 80k people in the U.S. died in last year's flu, and about 600 in the U.S. died so far from Covid-19, this is not a good cost-benefit argument, at all.

The flu is 1) not as contagious, and 2) does not have as high of a mortality rate. If as many people catch covid-19 as have the flu in the U.S., we will see a LOT of deaths. You know this already so I don't know why you're even using this argument.

chris08876 Mar 25, 2020 5:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8873334)
"Car wrecks" isn't a highly communicable respiratory disease.

What is communicable is the respiratory distress via huffing and puffing when one gets behind a mini-van doing 45 in a 65 on the left lane. In NJ/NY, its a pandemic.

montréaliste Mar 25, 2020 5:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8873550)
What is communicable is the respiratory distress via huffing and puffing when one gets behind a mini-van doing 45 in a 65 on the left lane. In NJ/NY, its a pandemic.



I'll huff and I'll puff, and I'll blow your van off the road. lol

montréaliste Mar 25, 2020 5:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8873550)
What is communicable is the respiratory distress via huffing and puffing when one gets behind a mini-van doing 45 in a 65 on the left lane. In NJ/NY, its a pandemic.



I'll huff and I'll puff, and I'll blow your van off the road. lol

SteveD Mar 25, 2020 5:27 PM

My primary care physician just sent out an email that he's got Covid-19. The office has been closed and he asked anyone who's been in during the month of March to self quarantine for 14 days (I hadn't been in over that time period).

He's actually a personal friend of mine, and he'd confided in me in recent years that he's exhausted and ready to retire.

Towards the end of the email he writes that's he's made the painful decision to close the office permanently in mid April.

hauntedheadnc Mar 25, 2020 5:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveD (Post 8873588)
My primary care physician just sent out an email that he's got Covid-19. The office has been closed and he asked anyone who's been in during the month of March to self quarantine for 14 days (I hadn't been in over that time period).

He's actually a personal friend of mine, and he'd confided in me in recent years that he's exhausted and ready to retire.

Towards the end of the email he writes that's he's made the painful decision to close the office permanently in mid April.

My husband, a healthcare professional, got his second notification that he might have been exposed. They've told him to just wear a mask and watch for symptoms, and to keep coming in.

SteveD Mar 25, 2020 5:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc (Post 8873597)
My husband, a healthcare professional, got his second notification that he might have been exposed. They've told him to just wear a mask and watch for symptoms, and to keep coming in.

Damn...stay safe!

Ten minutes after getting that email from my primary care doc I got an email from my dentist that they are temporarily canceling all routine dental care and will see patients for urgent emergency dental needs only.

mrnyc Mar 25, 2020 6:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8873343)
Driving cars directly leads to tens of thousands of annual deaths in the U.S. alone. So the analogy is appropriate.

If we have to shut down everything for an indeterminate period to prevent a communicable disease from killing people, we should probably ban driving to prevent vehicles from killing people. This assumes that saving lives trumps everything else, of course.

I'd argue there's actually a stronger argument for banning vehicles, given that car crash victims are largely random, while Covid-19 victims are already compromised. My child is highly unlikely to be harmed by Covid-19, but is somewhat likely to one day be harmed in a car crash.


no, because first of all we know everything there is to know about why cars kill and injure. we know little about the virus and have even less experience than knowledge of it.

secondly, as we know so much about cars we have rules for them, roads, seatbelts, etc. to try to keep order with them. that is, we have systems well in place for dealing with them. we have no way to know what to do like that for corona other than guesses.

and lastly, as for deaths via cars, the auto death and injury and damage rates have long been deemed acceptable by society. we are far from even being in the ballpark to assume anything like that that with the unknown and blooming corona damages right now. funny thing, people are probably much more likely to catch a corona than crash a car right at this moment in time as most transportation has ground to a crawl while corona is spiking.

Handro Mar 25, 2020 6:55 PM

Chicago's Mayor Lightfoot just had a press conference, said the police are now prepared to enforce the shelter-in-place after officials saw too many people ignoring the order.

jtown,man Mar 25, 2020 7:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8873334)
"Car wrecks" isn't a highly communicable respiratory disease.

What is your point?

jtown,man Mar 25, 2020 7:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8873515)
It just occurred to me; are people who are doing this right now in relation to the pandemic, in the bargaining stage of grief? Still trying to convince themselves that things would get better soon if only business restrictions were eased?

This has been a serious disruption in all of our lives; I really think people are going through some form of grief. Just a thought.

No.

I never said LETS GET BACK TO NORMAL TODAY.

I appreciate what the government is doing. My only point is when do we get back to normal and when do we accept whatever number of deaths as normal.

Pedestrian Mar 25, 2020 7:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 8873758)
Yes, someone stating something you don't agree with MUST be a Trumpian thought.

They've learned a lot from the Iranian mullahs about the value of identifying a "great Satan".

Unfortunately, as Iran is finding, that doesn't protect you from coronavirus.

Pedestrian Mar 25, 2020 7:47 PM

Quote:

Billionaire bunkers: Where the elite may ride out the coronavirus pandemic
Carolyn Said
March 25, 2020 Updated: March 25, 2020 11:55 a.m.

The very rich are different from you and me.

When times get tough, they don’t ravage Costco shelves for toilet paper and Clorox wipes. Instead they jet to luxury bunkers outfitted like underground mansions where they can wait out a pandemic or other cataclysm with all the comforts they’re accustomed to.

Silicon Valley executives and assorted billionaires who subscribe to Burning Man’s “radical self reliance” ethos have already been preparing for worst-case global scenarios. Now it turns out that they may have been prescient . . . .

These aren’t Cold War-style bomb shelters stocked with canned beans.

[They are] more like homes.”

That is, if your home is a 13,000-square-foot residence with a shooting range, bowling alley, movie theater, gym and greenhouse, like a $15 million bunker . . . in Napa . . . .

[There was] a run on requests for New Zealand bunkers a few years ago, . . . . mainly for clients from Silicon Valley . . . .

Billionaire venture capitalist Peter Thiel, co-founder of PayPal and an early Facebook investor, has a 477-acre former sheep station in New Zealand. He’s credited for turning the island nation into the tech world’s destination for doomsday preppers. An entire Vice documentary, “Hunt for the Bunker People,” centered on the New Zealand bolthole phenomenon.

More than half of his fellow Silicon Valley billionaires have built refuges in case of cataclysmic events, Hoffman told the magazine.

OpenAI CEO Sam Altman, told the New Yorker in 2016 that in the event of a pandemic, he would fly with Thiel to New Zealand. But that’s not his only back-up plan.

“I have guns, gold, potassium iodide, antibiotics, water, gas masks … and a big patch of land in Big Sur I can fly to,” he told the magazine . . . .

Some developers have turned former military installations into doomsday destinations. One big difference: Sometimes that means the residents will be cohabiting with other preppers, not just their immediate family.

Survival Condo has 14 luxury doomsday residences inside a former Atlas missile silo in Kansas built to withstand a nuclear strike. There’s a medical center, 75-foot-long swimming pool with waterfall, dog park, climbing wall, movie theater, well-stocked armory, hydroponic gardens for produce and an aquaculture system to breed fish for food. More than three years’ worth of food is stockpiled. Outside, armed guards patrol 24/7 . . . .

Prices are a bargain by Bay Area standards, ranging from $500,000 for a hotel-sized suite to $2.4 million for a full-floor unit . . . .

As with all bunker[s] . . . , one feature that’s de rigueur is top-notch air filtration. All the bunker-makers’ websites tout abilities such as screening out anthrax and of course, coronavirus.


For the bargain-basement-bunker shopper, Terra Vivos has 575 bunkers at a former military ordinance depot in Igloo, S.D., for $35,000 each. About 50 of the 2,200-square-foot residences have sold. Each has a separate entrance through its own blast door.

“They’re the townhouses at the end of the world,” . . . .
https://www.sfchronicle.com/business...t-15156717.php

pdxtex Mar 25, 2020 10:45 PM

Oregon is now in lockdown pretty hard. Most non essential businesses are at a standstill. The notion that millions of Americans could die sounds like malarkey as does our hospitals being overrun and overburdened. The death rate for pneumonia and influenza together at the same time is a staggering 10!%. Our new sneezy friend is more likely a coconspirator that is ushering in the demise of someone with a much worse malady. How much a life is worth is a distasteful subject but eventually I agree, that value will have to be weighed against the economic output octhe healthy populous....I'm also sure as shit this is the first viral virus. In 2008 barely 20 percent of the world had internet access. Sars, which is far more virulent didnt get 1/16th the press this bug is receiving. Wash your hands and stay safe but I fear the economic fallout 1000000x worse than Corona-cough.


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