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MichaelRyerson Apr 9, 2013 9:16 PM

Just a great pic...
 
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8406/8...b22ac0a5_o.jpg
BroadwayCrenshaw_2


ridley-thomas.lacounty.gov/Arts/index.php/tag/featured/

tovangar2 Apr 9, 2013 10:20 PM

:previous: The reverse view. The Baldwin Hills were still bare, brown velvet in '49:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-T...54006%2BPM.jpg
http://www.leimertparkbeat.com/profi...ource=activity

The Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza was built to emulate the success of the Miracle Mile. Those were great stores. The Broadway is a Walmart now. The Museum of African American Art (MAAA) has been in the May Co (now Macy's) building since 1975. Well worth a visit. http://www.maaala.org/ I got stuck in the frieght elevator there in the 90's when dropping something off at the museum. Also in the 90s Rosa Parks held a book signing at the museum. The line to see her snaked around the entire third floor. Very festive. Good times.

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-l...54320%2BPM.jpg
http://www.flickriver.com/groups/166...l/interesting/

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-k...54759%2BPM.jpg
http://www.baldwinhillscrenshawplaza.com/about

The Crenshaw May Co even somewhat mimiced the Miracle Mile store.
The display windows, "hanging gardens" and signage are now gone:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-x...54507%2BPM.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65359853@N00/4562161785/

CityBoyDoug Apr 9, 2013 10:35 PM

The McLean V-8
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6084457)
I wish I knew more about this contraption.

Los Angeles
http://imageshack.us/a/img94/3028/aa...motorwheel.jpg
Loomis Dean
__

These look fun but are relatively unstable. Click the YouTube link below and see one of these in action. Strictly something for the daredevil boys.

http://youtu.be/K4YmVP6i4qw

WS1911 Apr 9, 2013 10:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6083881)
More pics of the Church of Christ Scientist, 734 S. Hope Street.

_______

Thanks for posting the great photos of the Church of Christ Scientist. I remember the church well, but in its 1960s version. I never realized what it looked like originally. Some of the most picturesque brick/stone and wood buildings in Los Angeles and throughout the U. S. were built from the mid 1880s to mid 1890s, until Beaux-Arts architecture took hold.

MichaelRyerson Apr 9, 2013 11:04 PM

And right next door to the Broadway-Crenshaw (see it back there?)...


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8245/8...45c42c81_o.jpg
Von's, Los Angeles, Loomis Dean, 1949

Curb Service Von's

Von's supermarket is designed for auto shoppers, purchases are made the usual way, checked at counter, and loaded directly into car upon presentation of claim ticket. Los Angeles 1949

jalopyjournal

WS1911 Apr 9, 2013 11:17 PM

View looking northeast from L. A. County Courthouse ca. 1900.

http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/4...ourthousec.jpg

Is that an early natural gas storage tank in the background?

http://imageshack.us/a/img255/4760/n...useca1900d.jpg

USC Digital Archive

rick m Apr 10, 2013 12:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6080803)
Here's one last shot of the AL Bath Building/Willoughby Hotel. It gives a good view of the bookstore in the building next door on 5th street. This was posted somewhere back in the thread but I've never been able to find it again:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-h...838%2520PM.jpg
http://www.uncanny.net/~wetzel/subwayarea.htm

Some info from the City Directories: #326 W.5th - General News Agency is I.D. of the long ago newstand-bookstore. Simon's Circle Bar (notorious hustler joint) appears 1st in 1956 directory , then became Nebb's Coffeeshop (with bar far in the rear) in 1963 listing. The fancy choclatier at 500 N.Hill (corner business) likely established following WW2 rationing- it appears in 1956 as "The Candymakers" Then in 1965 we get Donut Chalet (with City Chicken only 2 doors south !) Surely well placed for park's denizens of the night - as John Rechy verified how all was on display from windows of the Googies at N/W corner of 5th and Olive - color image on LAYESTERDAYS site

tovangar2 Apr 10, 2013 2:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6084766)
And right next door to the Broadway-Crenshaw (see it back there?)...


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8245/8...45c42c81_o.jpg
Von's, Los Angeles, Loomis Dean, 1949

Curb Service Von's

Von's supermarket is designed for auto shoppers, purchases are made the usual way, checked at counter, and loaded directly into car upon presentation of claim ticket. Los Angeles 1949

jalopyjournal

That Studebaker in front and every other car in the line-up still has a divided windshield. I forgot how long that lasted.

Incredible that some municipal employees were still working by gaslight at the old International Bank Building DTLA when the above photo was taken. One could really time travel back then. The divide between pre- and post-war LA was sharp as a knife.

tovangar2 Apr 10, 2013 3:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WS1911 (Post 6084758)
_______

Thanks for posting the great photos of the Church of Christ Scientist. I remember the church well, but in its 1960s version. I never realized what it looked like originally. Some of the most picturesque brick/stone and wood buildings in Los Angeles and throughout the U. S. were built from the mid 1880s to mid 1890s, until Beaux-Arts architecture took hold.

In that post of GW's I referenced below he says the church was built in the late 1880's. I have been unable to find an actual build date or the name of the architect. Does anyone know?

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6083629)
That was the Third Church of Christ Scientist on Hope. It's gone but the Reading Room is still there.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=2883

The CS Reading Room remains a haven of calm in DTLA:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-e...61154%2BPM.jpg
gsv

tovangar2 Apr 10, 2013 4:59 AM

I can't let Angeleno Anna May Wong get away without adding a few favorite pix:

Anna May Wong/Wong Liu Tsong ("Frosted Willows") , 3 Jan 1905 - 2 Feb 1961. Born on Flower Street in a German, Chinese, Irish and Japanese neighborhood. In 1910 the Wong's moved to an Eastern European/Latino neighborhood centered on Figueroa. Her father, Wong Sam Sing, owned the Sam Kee Laundry. Chinese-born cinematographer James Wong Howe (1899-1976) was her cousin. Wong was picked to be an extra in the Alla Nazimova's vehicle, "The Red Lantern" (1919), her first film of 50. When Anna May's mother was struck and killed by a car outside the Figueroa Street house in 1930, Wong's father, although a second-generation American, moved to his ancestral village in China, taking some of Anna's younger siblings with him. His first wife and first child (a son, born in 1890) lived there too (he'd been married at the end of the 1880s on a previous trip to China, when he was only 19). He returned to LA in 1938 where he later died at 91, outliving his famous daughter by a year.


With her elegant, Edwardian-gowned mom, Lee Gon Toy, and older sister, Lulu/Liu Ying, in Los Angeles, circa 1906:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-U...61809%2BPM.jpg
http://gingerpost.com/?p=2049

A sensation in Europe (1929):
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-M...62223%2BPM.jpg
http://chinarhyming.blogspot.com/200...-dietrich.html

Rumoured to have had an affair with Dietrich in Berlin in the 20s,
they later made Shanghai Express" (1932) together.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-2...62634%2BPM.jpg
http://blackundwhite.tumblr.com/page/3

(Speaking of Dietrich and Robinson's too, I was rushing through Robinson's 7th St store on my lunch hour in the 70s when I noticed Dietrich sitting on a chair placed on a low, round plinth in the center of the main aisle completely unattended. I have no idea what the occasion was, some promotion I expect. I couldn't stop as my beeper had just gone off meaning there was a truck waiting at the loading dock which I had to deal with, but she looked terrific.)

A fave undated photo:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-C...62834%2BPM.jpg
http://pinterest.com/pin/138133913542488522/

A little memoir Wong wrote for Pictures Magazine in 1926 is here: http://gingerpost.com/?p=2049

P.S.


A dance from "Picadilly": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njtyFAhJ6ZE
In her own words: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rdjiMN_NSs
A tribute (stills):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htl-G9kSQf0

Wong's ashes (and those of her younger sister Mary) were buried in their mother's grave at Angelus Rosedale on W Washington Blvd. The sisters' names are etched on the stone in traditional Chinese. Anna May's name, 黃柳霜, is on the right:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-B...63126%2BPM.jpg
find a grave

Obviously still a place of pilgrimage.

MichaelRyerson Apr 10, 2013 1:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6085094)
In that post of GW's I referenced below he says the church was built in the late 1880's. I have been unable to find an actual build date or the name of the architect. Does anyone know?



The CS Reading Room remains a haven of calm in DTLA:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-j...545%2520PM.jpg
gsv

Do we think this is part of the original structure? I can't make the connection with the older images and this building. The bay window is certainly reminiscent of the original but would have had to be greatly modified to come out looking like this. help me here.


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8255/8...d980b9a5_o.jpg
Third Church of Christ, Scientist, S. Hope Street, Los Angeles

WS1911 Apr 10, 2013 2:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6085398)
Do we think this is part of the original structure? I can't make the connection with the older images and this building. The bay window is certainly reminiscent of the original but would have had to be greatly modified to come out looking like this. help me here.


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8255/8...d980b9a5_o.jpg
Third Church of Christ, Scientist, S. Hope Street, Los Angeles


It says here it was built in 1937. It looks like it would have blended in with the main building.

MichaelRyerson Apr 10, 2013 2:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WS1911 (Post 6085450)
It says here it was built in 1937. It looks like it would have blended in with the main building.

yeah, 1937 but blended where? as an addition? to the side? or simply on the bones of the demolished original? and 749,000 square feet?? wtf? with this frontage it'd have to go all the way to the river to tip the scales at three-quarters of a million square feet.

WS1911 Apr 10, 2013 3:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6085475)
yeah, 1937 but blended where? as an addition? to the side? or simply on the bones of the demolished original? and 749,000 square feet?? wtf? with this frontage it'd have to go all the way to the river to tip the scales at three-quarters of a million square feet.


By blended, I meant in architectural style. It was an addition to the main building but I don't know about it being connected or not. I have no idea what the 749,000 square feet refers to. Probably a typo :)

ProphetM Apr 10, 2013 3:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6085475)
yeah, 1937 but blended where? as an addition? to the side? or simply on the bones of the demolished original? and 749,000 square feet?? wtf? with this frontage it'd have to go all the way to the river to tip the scales at three-quarters of a million square feet.

Please refer to my post of a couple page back showing the building over the years:

7 pictures on page 694.

The last exterior pic is from 1965, showing the reading room building added immediately to the left of the tower. The original church site is now a parking lot.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-D...0/00075525.jpg
LAPL

MichaelRyerson Apr 10, 2013 3:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6085499)
Please refer to my post of a couple page back showing the building over the years:

7 pictures on page 694.

The last exterior pic is from 1965, showing the reading room building added immediately to the left of the tower. The original church site is now a parking lot.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-D...0/00075525.jpg
LAPL

Thanks, I've got to remember to read my way forward before posting dumb stuff. They did a nice job, all things considered, of staying generally in style and substance with the earlier building. Although you can see the reading room lacks some of the detailed brickwork so benefits from the ivy covering. Looking at the whole of the structure and thinking it is now largely a parking lot makes me vaguely nauseous.

MichaelRyerson Apr 10, 2013 3:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WS1911 (Post 6085495)
By blended, I meant in architectural style. It was an addition to the main building but I don't know about it being connected or not. I have no idea what the 749,000 square feet refers to. Probably a typo :)

stand down. I was speaking before thinking/reading. prophetm came along and set me straight. I am duly chastened. 749,000 sq ft. basements?

Lwize Apr 10, 2013 3:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6085499)
The last exterior pic is from 1965...

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-D...0/00075525.jpg
LAPL

I'm guessing the bell tower was lowered due to damage caused by the 1933 Long Beach earthquake? Any pre/post earthquake pictures? Too bad the 1971 Sylmar quake finished it off.

ProphetM Apr 10, 2013 3:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6085503)
Thanks, I've got to remember to read my way forward before posting dumb stuff. They did a nice job, all things considered, of staying generally in style and substance with the earlier building. Although you can see the reading room lacks some of the detailed brickwork so benefits from the ivy covering. Looking at the whole of the structure and thinking it is now largely a parking lot makes me vaguely nauseous.

Indeed. Stupid earthquakes! :hell:

I do like that they retained the wall & archway that once connected to the tower. I suppose they didn't really have to keep that.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lwize (Post 6085528)
I'm guessing the bell tower was lowered due to damage caused by the 1933 Long Beach earthquake? Any pre/post earthquake pictures? Too bad the 1971 Sylmar quake finished it off.

That would be my guess as well, but I was not able to find any pics between the 1920s one and 1965 to know for sure.

SoCal1954 Apr 10, 2013 4:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6085212)
I can't let Angeleno Anna May Wong get away without adding a few favorite pix:


Anna May Wong/Wong Lew Tsong ("Frosted Willows") , 3 Jan 1905 - 2 Feb 1961. Born on Flower Street in a German, Chinese, Irish and Japanese neighborhood. In 1910 the Wong's moved to an Eastern European/Latino neighborhood centered on Figueroa. Her father owned the Sam Kee Laundry. Chinese-born James Wong Howe (1899-1976) was her cousin. Wong was picked to be an extra in the Alla Nazimova's vehicle, "The Red Lantern" (1919), her first film. When Anna May's mother was struck and killed by a car outside the Figueroa Street house in 1930, Wong's father, although a second-generation American, moved to his ancestral village in China, taking some of Anna's six younger siblings with him. His first wife and first child, a son, lived there too (he'd been married many years before on a previous trip to China). He returned to LA in 1938 where he later died at 91.

A fave undated photo:
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-r...925%2520PM.jpg
http://pinterest.com/pin/138133913542488522/

A little memoir Wong wrote for Pictures Magazine in 1926 is here: http://gingerpost.com/?p=2049


From Time Magazine January 29, 2005:

Tall, pretty and sinuously graceful, Wong had a smoldering effect on people, especially men; they could be driven to a purple passion trying to describe her beauty. It's said that her friend Eric Maschwitz wrote the dreamy lyrics to the memorable pop standard These Foolish Things in Wong's honor.

A cigarette that bears a lipstick's traces
An airline ticket to romantic places
And still my heart has wings
These foolish things
Remind me of you
A tinkling piano in the next apartment
Those stumbling words that told you
What my heart meant
A fairground's painted swings
These foolish things
Remind me of you
You came, you saw, you conquered me
When you did that to me
I somehow knew that this had to be
The winds of march that make my heart a dancer
A telephone that rings, but who's to answer?
Oh, how the ghost of you clings
These foolish things
Remind me of you

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsUVKmDHNcg

She also had mesmerized set and costume designer Ali Hubert, in his little Wong rhapsody: "On her tender and youthful body, expressing every moment with the indescribable grace of the Oriental woman....only a Van Eyck or a Holbein could capture her on canvas."

In 1938 Look magazine named her the "world's most beautiful Chinese girl." TIME magazine, run by, China-born Henry Luce, was a special champion, taking every opportunity to chronicle her social life.

All this, for an actress who by convention, was not allowed to kiss her leading man. All this, for a Hollywood star who, at the peak of her popularity, could not have bought a house in Beverly Hills. All this, for a woman (an American citizen) no white man could legally have married in her home state of California, until 1948.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/arts/articl...#ixzz2Q4mwN73W


New Chinatown Los Angeles 1938
http://i50.tinypic.com/2im553t.jpg
Tumblr.com


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