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-   -   New York City - Transit News (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=154524)

Inkoumori Dec 29, 2012 7:14 AM

N/a

aquablue Dec 29, 2012 8:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inkoumori (Post 5953013)
While JFK is lacking, I wouldn't say Heathrow or CDG are much better. Even Shanghai has its problems despite the mag-lev. I fly into CDG often and I wouldn't call it a "1 seat ride". It's a complicated issue which I feel JFK has dealt with well for now.;)



Heathrow not much better? The train goes right under the terminals and it is express right into the central station!!!

Paris has the RER into the center of the city from the airport station!

NY should improve this as the airtrain only handles a minute percentage of passengers going into the city as of now. Asking people to make a transfer is going to reduce the ridership by rail into the city as people don't want to think too much when arriving in a foreign city. Perhaps they want it that way (afraid of upsetting taxi lobby?), if so, how pathetic. Getting cars off the congested highways would be beneficial to everyone.

M II A II R II K Dec 30, 2012 11:16 PM

MTA To "Revisit" Installing Sliding Doors In Subway Stations

Read More: http://gothamist.com/2012/12/29/mta_..._sliding_d.php

Quote:

.....

Based on the MTA's preliminary analysis, the challenge of installing platform edge barriers in the New York City subway system would be both expensive and extremely challenging given the varied station designs and the differences in door positions among some subway car classes.

But in light of recent tragic events, we will consider the options for testing such equipment on a limited basis. Of course, we remind customers of the overall safety of the subway system but urge them to stand well back from the platform edge and remain watchful of their surroundings.

.....



http://gothamist.com/attachments/bya...912sliding.jpg

J. Will Dec 31, 2012 8:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inkoumori (Post 5952992)
I'm not sure what you mean by a "1 seat ride" to Manhattan? Airtrain does the airport loop and LIRR does the Manhattan (also Brooklyn) trip @ Jamaica. Plus the E, J, Z. :shrug:

You can also pick up the A at Howard Beach @ Airtrain.

It only takes a few minutes to get off those trains and get on the Airtrain to all the terminals, I do it quite often, it works well.

LIRR is direct from Jamaica to Penn or Atlantic.

Do you not understand the term? One-seat ride means you sit down on some form of transportation at the airport terminal, and it takes you to Manhattan without a transfer. None of the three major NYC area airports offer a one-seat transit ride into Manhattan unless you count a slow bus route from Laguardia to Harlem.

VivaLFuego Dec 31, 2012 4:16 PM

Relatively speaking, JFK's connection to Manhattan is fine if a bit expensive, particularly connecting to the LIRR at Jamaica. The connection via the subway at Howard Beach is pretty painfully slow.

Maybe my travel habits and the airlines I generally fly (i.e. United/Star Alliance) give me a certain bias, but I've generally felt like the pick-your-poison painful transit options to LaGuardia is a bigger issue than JFK's access, at least since the construction of AirTrain.

aquablue Dec 31, 2012 4:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VivaLFuego (Post 5954488)
Relatively speaking, JFK's connection to Manhattan is fine if a bit expensive, particularly connecting to the LIRR at Jamaica. The connection via the subway at Howard Beach is pretty painfully slow.

Maybe my travel habits and the airlines I generally fly (i.e. United/Star Alliance) give me a certain bias, but I've generally felt like the pick-your-poison painful transit options to LaGuardia is a bigger issue than JFK's access, at least since the construction of AirTrain.

Yes, but after a long international flight, many would rather take a taxi than deal with a complicated transfer. Also, JFK is twice as busy as laguardia, not that it isn't pathetic that laguardia doesn't have some kind of rail access.

Inkoumori Jan 1, 2013 1:04 AM

N/a

M II A II R II K Jan 1, 2013 1:13 AM

And you have the Picadilly Line available where you could work your way to Paddington anyway. And that's assuming that's where you want to go in the first place!

Inkoumori Jan 1, 2013 1:14 AM

N/a

Inkoumori Jan 1, 2013 1:18 AM

N/a

J. Will Jan 1, 2013 6:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inkoumori (Post 5954999)
Of course I understand, and however nice that term sounds it doesn't exactly explain the nuances of each system. LGA is of course a running joke for everyone in NYC so....

But I don't really find it that difficult to use EWR-Airtrain-NJ Transit or JFK-Airtrain-LIRR. The idea that it's such a hardship vs. LHR or CDG is overblown imho.

The issue wasn't whether or not you find any of these commutes to be a "hardship". You specifically said:

Quote:

I'm not sure what you mean by a "1 seat ride" to Manhattan?
That's what I was responding to. That statement suggests to me that you don't understand what the term "one seat ride" means. You actually said that you're not sure what he means by a one-seat ride. I don't know how else to interpret that statement other than that you don't understand the term.

Inkoumori Jan 1, 2013 6:59 AM

N/a

J. Will Jan 1, 2013 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inkoumori (Post 5955181)
True "one seat ride" airports are few and pretty much exclusive only to small European or newly constructed airports in Asia.

No. Even Vancouver has a one-seat rail ride from the airport terminal to downtown. Toronto will soon as well. I took the train from Newark airport in June. The problem is that the NJT trains don't run at regular intervals. If they ran say every 10 or every 15 minutes all day it would be great. But sometimes there's a long wait between two trains, sometimes there's a short wait.

And quit being so damn sensitive to comments asking you to clarify your statements.

Inkoumori Jan 1, 2013 11:14 AM

N/a

J. Will Jan 1, 2013 12:14 PM

LOL. I took your comments as you wrote them. To call that trolling is idiotic. Then again, look who I'm talking to. :haha::haha::haha:

You're lying when you suggest I was "trolling" you. You comments made it sound that you didn't understand a term, so I explained it to you. You need to stop being such a sensitive child. :haha:

jd3189 Jan 1, 2013 4:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by M II A II R II K (Post 5954071)
MTA To "Revisit" Installing Sliding Doors In Subway Stations

Read More: http://gothamist.com/2012/12/29/mta_..._sliding_d.php






http://gothamist.com/attachments/bya...912sliding.jpg

Of course what they will be planning will look nothing like Hong Kong's.

Busy Bee Jan 1, 2013 5:53 PM

^Nor should they. Frankly I think the platform gates like that of Hong Kong or Paris are totally overbuilt. With their glass sliding doors and walls of 8 feet height, they make the platform seem like a long claustrophobic elevator car or waiting room. There is no reason IMO that a gate can't be just that: a waist height metal railing not totally unlike something one would see on a roller coaster ride platform. This way the station "room" remains psychological open and contiguous with much less disruption aesthetically while achieving the ultimate goal of preventing deaths and injuries both accidental and malicious. What I have in my mind is something like a long minimalist tube, similar to standard subway railings mounted into the platform floor, stainless in color, floating as much as structurally possible – think Apple store. When the train arrives (with future PTC automation) the doors line up with the designated "gates" that appear relatively seamless except for designation markings of some kind or thickness change, etc. At that point a hydraulic or electrical system pulls the arm segment into itself, with tight tolerances of measurement and rounded design to prevent pinching injuries. After unloading and loading the arms close synchronistically with car doors with "smart" pressure, similar to doors, to prevent someone or thing from getting pinned between the arms, only closing when obstruction free.

This is all one needs, those glass walls and doors seem like the product of an engineer that's gotten completely out of hand. Not to mention the exorbitant cost.

electricron Jan 1, 2013 8:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 5955357)
^Nor should they. Frankly I think the platform gates like that of Hong Kong or Paris are totally overbuilt. With their glass sliding doors and walls of 8 feet height, they make the platform seem like a long claustrophobic elevator car or waiting room. There is no reason IMO that a gate can't be just that: a waist height metal railing not totally unlike something one would see on a roller coaster ride platform. This way the station "room" remains psychological open and contiguous with much less disruption aesthetically while achieving the ultimate goal of preventing deaths and injuries both accidental and malicious. What I have in my mind is something like a long minimalist tube, similar to standard subway railings mounted into the platform floor, stainless in color, floating as much as structurally possible – think Apple store. When the train arrives (with future PTC automation) the doors line up with the designated "gates" that appear relatively seamless except for designation markings of some kind or thickness change, etc. At that point a hydraulic or electrical system pulls the arm segment into itself, with tight tolerances of measurement and rounded design to prevent pinching injuries. After unloading and loading the arms close synchronistically with car doors with "smart" pressure, similar to doors, to prevent someone or thing from getting pinned between the arms, only closing when obstruction free.

This is all one needs, those glass walls and doors seem like the product of an engineer that's gotten completely out of hand. Not to mention the exorbitant cost.

Whereas I agree with your opinion in many ways, there's just one point you forgot. Railings aren't going to prevent suicides. They will just jump over your gate so they can jump in front of the train. Tempered glass doors prevents those intentional mishaps.

M II A II R II K Jan 1, 2013 8:59 PM

And a fire wouldn't be fueled by an incoming train if it were separated from the platform.

aquablue Jan 2, 2013 12:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inkoumori (Post 5955003)
N/a

You erased all your comments, hmm.


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