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M II A II R II K May 26, 2016 7:20 PM

The Triboro: Transit For The Boroughs

Read More (Interactive): http://library.rpa.org/interactive/the-triboro/

Quote:

The New York City boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and the Bronx are home to 6.6 million people. Many of them are poorly served by the city’s century-old, Manhattan-centric transit system.

- In A Region at Risk: The Third Regional Plan for the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut Metropolitan Area, RPA proposed a circumferential transit line called the Triboro to connect the three boroughs. The above-ground line would cross over many subway and commuter rail lines and take advantage of underused and abandoned rights-of-way. Over the years, RPA has continued to develop the proposal. This paper outlines RPA’s most recent analysis on the Triboro Line and highlights the enormous opportunity it represents for New York and the metropolitan region.

- Running 24 miles from Co-op City in the Bronx to Bay Ridge in Brooklyn, the Triboro would act as the wheel connecting the various spokes of the subway system branching from Manhattan. It would open an urgently needed north-south transit corridor, allowing New Yorkers for the first time to move seamlessly between communities in these three boroughs. The Triboro would intersect with 17 subway lines and four commuter rail lines along its route. The increased connectivity between boroughs and to existing Manhattan-bound lines would improve access to New York’s jobs, schools and resources for the hundreds of thousands of people currently living in dozens of neighborhoods now poorly served by transit.

- In addition, the Triboro could increase reverse access to the suburbs for residents of the boroughs by creating opportunities for transfers to outbound Metro-North and Long Island Rail Road commuter services. The new line would use an existing rail right-of-way, which means it could be built faster and more cheaply than other recent, large-scale transit projects in the New York region. The Triboro would ease subway crowding and create a more efficient, resilient and equitable transit system. --- The Triboro has the potential to offer 100,000 riders transit service every five to 15 minutes at more than double bus speeds. Of the 22 possible stations identified, half would link to subway lines. Thousands more riders could be drawn to the Triboro to connect to the subway system rather than rely on transfers from slow bus routes.

.....



http://i.imgur.com/OBGFQg1.png

mrnyc May 28, 2016 3:31 PM

unfortunately the long dreamed about triboro rx will never happen. it serves a constituancy nobody in power cares about.

mrnyc May 28, 2016 3:36 PM

behold the new mta subway map.

the w train is back and it has a mythical something called a 2nd ave subway:


http://www.amny.com/transit/second-a...map-1.11847457

urbanlife May 28, 2016 6:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrnyc (Post 7456177)
behold the new mta subway map.

the w train is back and it has a mythical something called a 2nd ave subway:


http://www.amny.com/transit/second-a...map-1.11847457

Oh weird, so the Q won't go to Queens anymore? I know some friends that live along that line that might be annoyed by that. From what I am reading, it sounds like the W will just be a local running train through Queens and Manhattan, that will definitely suck for those use to the Q going express.

Though this is another thing to add to the list for when I ever make it back to NYC to visit, make sure to ride the Q to the UES to see the new part of the system.



Oh wait, I just noticed they will be running the N train on express during the weekdays, that is nice at least for losing the Q train to Queens.

chris08876 Jun 1, 2016 12:05 AM

http://www.newgeography.com/files/cox-nycmetro-1.png

http://www.newgeography.com/files/cox-nycmetro-2.png

http://www.newgeography.com/files/cox-nycmetro-3.png

Quote:

The New York City subway accounts carries nearly 2.5 times the annual ridership of the other nine largest metro systems in the nation combined (Figure 2). This is 10 times that of Washington’s Metro, which is losing ridership despite strong population growth , probably partly due to safety concerns (see America’s Subway: America’s Embarrassment?). Things have gotten so bad in Washington that the federal government has threatened to close the system (See: Feds Forced to Set Priorities for Washington Subway).

The New York City subway carries more than 11 times the ridership of the Chicago “L”, though like in New York, the ridership trend on the “L” has increased impressively in recent years. The New York City subway carries and more than 50 times the Los Angeles subway ridership, where MTA (and SCRTD) bus and rail ridership has declined over the past 30 years despite an aggressive rail program (See: Just How Much has Los Angeles Transit Ridership Fallen?).

With these gains, the New York City Subway's share of national transit ridership has risen from less than one of each five riders (18 percent) in 2005 to more than one in four (26 percent) in 2015. This drove the New York City metropolitan areas share of all national transit ridership from 30 percent in 2005 to over 37 percent in 2015.

Subway ridership dominates transit in the New York City metropolitan area as well, at 67 percent. Other New York City oriented transit services, including services that operate within the city exclusively and those that principally carry commuters in and out of the city account for 28 percent of the ridership. This includes the commuter rail systems (Long Island Railroad, Metro-North Railroad and New Jersey Transit) and the Metro from New Jersey (PATH) have experienced ridership increases of approximately 15 percent over last decade (Note 2).

Other transit services, those not oriented to New York City, account for five percent of the metropolitan area's transit ridership (Figure 3). By comparison, approximately 58 percent of the population lives outside the city of New York. The small transit ridership share not oriented to New York City illustrates a very strong automobile component in suburban mobility even in the most well-served transit market in the country.
============================
http://www.newgeography.com/content/...redible-subway

chris08876 Jun 3, 2016 11:00 PM

LaGuardia terminal's $4 billion revamp will finally begin

http://www.crainsnewyork.com/apps/pb...creen&maxw=770

Quote:

A consortium of private partners closed on a deal Wednesday to develop a $4 billion replacement to the maligned LaGuardia Airport's Central Terminal Building and operate the new facility through 2050.

The agreement marks the completion of the biggest public-private partnership in the history of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns and operates the region's major airports. The Port Authority entered into the deal with the consortium, LaGuardia Gateway Partners.

The group, whose members include airport operator Vantage Airport Group, construction firm Skanska and the investment company Meridiam, won the bid for the project last May. But a competition last year to create a more holistic redesign of the entire airport delayed the deal's closing, and political wrangling at the Port Authority also almost derailed the plan in recent months.

"Today's contractual closing of the public-private partnership and the imminent commencement of construction represent a huge step forward," Pat Foye, the Port Authority's executive director, said in a statement. "The new terminal will be a 21st-century facility offering a high level of customer service and amenities.”

LaGuardia Gateway Partners will begin work on the project this summer, first demolishing a large parking garage in front of the current Central Terminal. The new 1.3 million-square-foot building will rise on that site and feature dual pedestrian bridges spanning active aircraft taxi lanes that connect the terminal to two island concourses. The islands-and-bridges design—the first of its kind to be built at a major airport—allows for improved airline circulation and gate flexibility, which will help reduce airport delays.

[...]
===========================
http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...-finally-begin

mrnyc Jun 4, 2016 5:52 AM

inevitable i suppose:

http://nypost.com/2016/06/02/finally...appening-soon/

mrnyc Jun 13, 2016 4:50 PM

examples of subway station artwork:


TRANSIT

NYC subway art: See photos of stunning and thought-provoking artwork
By Lauren Cook June 8, 2016

http://www.amny.com/transit/nyc-subw...rks-1.11891428

http://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/1...004/image.jpeg

mrnyc Jun 13, 2016 4:52 PM

gridlock!



New York City crippled by congestion, Department of Transportation report says

By Vincent Barone vin.barone@amny.com June 9, 2016


The only way out of New York City’s crippling congestion is through a sincere funding of mass transit, officials say.

The renewed push comes after the release of the city Department of Transportation’s Mobility Report on Wednesday, which underscores how New York’s rapidly growing population is choking its streets as tightly as its mass transit network below.

Buses and taxis are struggling to navigate the gridlock, driving down surface-level transit ridership, while the subway system is buckling under a record number of commuters hoping to avoid the mess above.

“The report’s conclusions are clear: as we move forward, policy makers will need to redouble our efforts to chart a course that supports mass transit and other options to keep a growing and thriving New York City moving,” said DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg in a statement.

In the five-year period from 2010 through 2015, the city added 370,000 more residents, 520,000 more jobs—the equivalent of absorbing Montana’s entire workforce, the report notes—and 10 million more visiting tourists.


more:
http://www.amny.com/transit/new-york...ays-1.11894858

mrnyc Jun 13, 2016 5:00 PM

MetroCard’s successor could transform New York City transit

By Vincent Barone vin.barone@amny.com May 25, 2016


The MTA launched a request for ideas forMTA seeking ideas for MetroCard replacement.

The turnstile tango is coming to an end.

You know the moves:

first you fish for the MetroCard in your purse, wallet or pocket.

Then you flip the card for proper swipe orientation (a manageable step, sure, but one that can easily stump stumpers like Hillary Clinton and visitors to this city, alike).

On a good day, that step will be punctuated with just one “please swipe again.”

That daily dance undertaken by millions is one of the reasons why the MTA is pursuing a new payment system.

The MetroCard, at 22 years old, has aged poorly compared to the rate of technological advancements in its lifetime. The MTA is essentially managing its own currency and that’s becoming increasingly expensive to maintain. It costs the agency about 15 cents to collect every dollar in revenue.

“The MetroCard doesn’t take advantage of the efficiencies of technology that have been introduced in the past 20 years,” said John Raskin, executive director of the Riders Alliance. “If we don’t replace it now, expect a lot more system failures and breakdowns in the coming years.”

The MTA hopes to begin a slow phase out of MetroCards in 2018, at a cost of $619 million, after a slew of mobile payment pilots and delays over the past ten years. It’s proven challenging for the MTA to pin its next fare system on technology that’s evolving so rapidly.

Certain details are clear.

A new, open fare technology will be harnessed in riders’ smartphones, credit cards and pre-paid cards — similar to London’s Oyster card or PATH’s SmartLink.

Dips and swipes will be swapped for taps and scans. If properly executed, transit experts say the new technology can transform how New Yorkers traverse their city, as did the MetroCard when it replaced the MTA’s iconic tokens.

“Options like free transfers [and] unlimited fares were made possible by the MetroCard. That was huge,” said Rich Barone, vice president for transportation at the Regional Plan Association. “It’s going to be the technology, but really the fare policy that comes with the new technology, that could totally transform transit in New York City.”

For the MTA, a key to an open fare payment system is meeting customers where they already are—their phones—and building an inclusive system that will work across all services, like the Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North. Don’t expect drastic changes to turnstiles, yet. The MTA plans to begin the rollout by retrofitting its current infrastructure.

The switch over itself, advocates predict, could bring tangible service improvements, especially on buses.


more:
http://www.amny.com/transit/metrocar...sit-1.11837974

mrnyc Jun 14, 2016 10:44 PM

lga now comes in at $7b --- w/o the airtrain and ferry service:

http://therealdeal.com/2016/06/14/la...-estimated-7b/

Busy Bee Jun 15, 2016 12:06 AM

^I almost hope the whole thing dies on the vine. LaGuardia needs a fundamental rethinking not a another one of these incremental afterthought band aid solutions. NY needs to stop dicking around and start acting like the alpha city it is and push for a plan more along the lines of the RethinkNYC plan.

chris08876 Jun 15, 2016 12:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 7474433)
^I almost hope the whole thing dies on the vine. LaGuardia needs a fundamental rethinking not a another one of these incremental afterthought band aid solutions. NY needs to stop dicking around and start acting like the alpha city it is and push for a plan more along the lines of the RethinkNYC plan.

Thats would be the reasonable thing to do, but things will have to get much worse for real effective change to happen. It's all bureaucratic nonsense with these large scale projects. Especially when it involves Albany.

Nexis4Jersey Jun 15, 2016 2:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 7474433)
^I almost hope the whole thing dies on the vine. LaGuardia needs a fundamental rethinking not a another one of these incremental afterthought band aid solutions. NY needs to stop dicking around and start acting like the alpha city it is and push for a plan more along the lines of the RethinkNYC plan.

That plan is severely flawed & the team when pushed refuses to answer questions.. Read Hammerskievers blog about it... https://urbanramblesblog.wordpress.c...t-rethink-nyc/

Busy Bee Jun 15, 2016 4:04 AM

^It's scale of ambition is what I am lauding, not necessarily every detail of their proposal. I realize relocating and absorbing Rikers would probably become the hottest political potato NY has seen in years but I think its doable. I also think we need people proposing as many outside the box ideas, especially those about rail transit expansion and connectivity, as we can --- and that plan does that.

Nexis4Jersey Jun 15, 2016 5:35 AM

I'm not knocking out of the box ideas , but there plan is so flawed on many fronts and the fact that people seem to praise it at first drives me nuts... Everyone who looks into it , laughs at it... I did invite the team on here but they seem to have declined...it had a luke warm reception on reddit... Through running is a wonderful idea but there plan makes no sense and is not through running but more like a shuttle point 2 useless points.. There redevelopment plan for Sunnyside and Port Morris is a waste of space...there stations are overbuilt...etc...list goes on and on..

202_Cyclist Jun 16, 2016 6:57 PM

De Blasio’s $325 Million Ferry Push: Rides to 5 Boroughs, at Subway Price
 
De Blasio’s $325 Million Ferry Push: Rides to 5 Boroughs, at Subway Price

https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016...-master768.jpg
A pier at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, which will eventually be the home port for the expanded ferry service that the city is starting in 2017. Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

"With New York City’s subway trains jammed to capacity and more people than ever pouring into neighborhoods outside Manhattan, Mayor Bill de Blasio is embarking on an ambitious and expensive plan to create a fleet of city-owned ferryboats that would crisscross the surrounding waterways and connect all five boroughs.

At a cost of more than $325 million, Mr. de Blasio’s expansion of ferry service would be one of the biggest bets any city in the world has made on boats as vehicles for mass transit. The mayor predicts that the ferries would carry 4.5 million passengers a year, about twice as many riders as San Francisco’s ferry system handles.

Mr. de Blasio has promised New Yorkers that ferries will start running on three new routes, serving South Brooklyn, and Astoria and the Rockaways in Queens, by the end of June 2017, four months before he would stand for re-election. Additional routes to the Lower East Side of Manhattan and to Soundview in the Bronx will be added in 2018..."

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/16/ny...vice.html?_r=0

tdawg Jun 16, 2016 7:14 PM

Yay about the W! I live at the Ditmars Blvd stop and am happy to hear that they are bringing it back to replace the Q. Honestly, I thought commute times were faster before with the W so we'll have to see what happens. Plus the Q didn't always run out Astoria on the weekends, instead stopping at 57th Street. I wonder if the W will now do the same?

mrnyc Jun 17, 2016 4:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Busy Bee (Post 7474623)
^It's scale of ambition is what I am lauding, not necessarily every detail of their proposal. I realize relocating and absorbing Rikers would probably become the hottest political potato NY has seen in years but I think its doable. I also think we need people proposing as many outside the box ideas, especially those about rail transit expansion and connectivity, as we can --- and that plan does that.

actually no regarding rikers. there is a lot of current behind the scenes discussion about closing it and how to do this. a lot. from various fronts, but everyone is talking and in general agreement if you can believe it. i am told it will happen, but at the moment it seems like it will be slowly and over time. like a decade or more. it really cannot reasonably be done any quicker, but the good thing about that is time will depoliticize the issue quite a bit. how it will work is, the low hanging fruit are the 16-18yo's, they will be moved out first. this within a few years. then rosie singer inmates (women) will be moved out, and then no one is sure as yet, but gradually the men. as you would expect, facilities money is a big holdup.

manchester united Jun 19, 2016 6:20 PM

Late night R service extension to Manhattan !!!
http://www.mta.info/news-r-r-train-r...ansfers-faster


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