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  #21101  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 3:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

slide/1964

slide/ebay

I believe this eagle is from outside the American Airlines office on the northeast corner of Hollywood and Vinyl (oops...I meant Vine )

__
That's a Richfield eagle, er . . .

(previously posted by me) USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/50842/rec/10

If I remember correctly, this eagle was designed in 1937; this one was meant to hang in a window:

Photo by me

Your 1964 photo may have been taken outside Richfield's 645 S. Mariposa (@ Wilshire) building; compare the wall in your photo with the wall in these 1978
photos of the then-Atlantic Richfield building (the former Cord building). The Wilshire side is in the top photo, Mariposa side in bottom photo:

LAPL -- http://jpg1.lapl.org/00090/00090147.jpg


LAPL -- http://jpg1.lapl.org/00090/00090148.jpg
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  #21102  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 3:44 AM
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-thanks Flyingwedge.

Here's the American Airlines Eagle from the same time period. It's quite similar to the Richfield Eagle.

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=474643

I thought I had seen this eagle at Hollywood & Vine.

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 27, 2014 at 4:18 AM.
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  #21103  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 4:20 AM
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The Flats

The Flats is the area of Los Angeles primarily bounded by the Los Angeles River, 101 Freeway, and the 6th Street Bridge.
ER posted this nice map about a month ago (thanks ER). The population center of the area is mostly located on the east side of the river.




By the turn of the twentieth century, The Flats had already become an area where new immigrants moved to work at jobs near the river.
This area was the location of small industrial enterprises, livestock related businesses and the rail yards. These low wage workers lived
primarily in house courts, which usually included three or more habitations on one lot, with the unoccupied portion (and any utilities) shared by everyone.


Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff


www.oac.cdlib.org

Naturally, this led to overcrowding and the city became concerned about the heath conditions in the area. The area had already been designated
as a slum, but the Los Angeles Housing Commission was still small and could only handle problems on a case-by-case basis. When the bubonic
plague crisis hit Los Angeles in 1924, it didn’t take long to get to The Flats.


www.oac.cdlib.org


www.oac.cdlib.org


In 1934, Lloyd Wright (Frank Lloyd Wright's son) and a group of architects presented their plan for a public housing project in the area to the Public
Works Administration. Although that project fell through, Lloyd Wright and his group were back in 1940 with plans for Aliso Village, an eight hundred
unit apartment complex funded by the Federal Housing Act of 1937. By October of 1940, the city had sent out Charles Shattruck and his assistant
to locate and record houses to be torn down for the project.


Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff


Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff


Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff


Soon, the slums of The Flats were torn down…


lapl


lapl

…and the new “Garden City Movement” project took their place.

(before)

Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff

(after)

Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff


lapl

By 1942, Aliso Village was hailed as a success, and even became a model for integrated housing.


lapl

After the war ended, most of the non-Hispanic residents left and Aliso Village was populated primarily with new immigrants from Mexico.
Going forward to the 1980’s, the area was now plagued with a combination of deteriorating structures and gang violence. In 1996, the
Los Angeles Housing Authority wrote off Aliso Village and made plans to replace it with the “New Urbanist” project called Pueblo del Sol.

By around 2000, Aliso Village was gone.


Google Street View


Google Street View

So, is everyone happy? No, the new project reduced the number of housing units in the area down to 377, exacerbating the city’s affordable housing shortage.

Last edited by FredH; Apr 27, 2014 at 4:40 AM.
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  #21104  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 5:31 AM
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Below: Capitol's 1st office at 1483 Vine Street, Hollywood, CA. The entry is highlighted in blue. Detail from a photo by Otto Rothschild.



Below: Capitol's 2nd office at 1507 Vine Street, Hollywood, CA. The offices took up the entire 2nd floor above Glenn Wallichs' Music City. Detail from a photo by Gene Lester.

Wallich's Music City was managed by Clyde Wallich, Glenn's brother. Clyde lived in the Ardmore Apartments at Whitley and Franklin Avenue.
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  #21105  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 1:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Looking west down Wilshire Boulevard between Wilton Place and Van Ness, 1960

GW will know. Mystery photo for a day. Back tomorrow. (Nice little oval-windowed VW).

USC digital archive/Los Angeles Examiner Collection, 1920-1961

The flower stand was between 4016 Wilshire and what was once known as the "unicorn" on NLA--otherwise, the Streamline Moderne 4032 Wilshire (just recently discussed here)...which, ever shy, is hiding behind the flower shop (addressed 4026 Wilshire) and "Burgie" billboard. ("Burgie" was the nickname for Burgermeister beer, brewed by Hamm's.)

Below is the flower shop from a different angle and before the Wilshire Specials were replaced. 4016 Wilshire at left still stands. (See its history here; 4032's is here.) The driveway at right in the shot below looks fairly new--its crosshatching matches the concrete in the later shot of the Streamline 4032, built 1936.



The building with the I.W. Harper billboard on top in the USC shot is the 1948 Wilshire Medical Center (see bottom shot here) built on the site of 4036 Wilshire (a house whose origins remain elusive, although it was one home and shop of actress/beautician/lousy plastic surgeon/countess Irehne Hobson, seen on NLA recently). By 1960, the unicorn at 4032 didn't have long to live--the next year, there was a new 4032, which still stands, as seen below. The Wilshire Medical Center next door has come and gone, but the 1961 4032 and, amazingly, 4016 remain.




The 1948 Wilshire Medical Center at 4036 has come and gone--note the house at right in this architect's rendering. It's the Woolwine house at 4040 Wilshire, whose story (in progress) is here.
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  #21106  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 4:00 PM
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I don't remember seeing this 1929 aerial before. The main street is Wilshire and the staggered intersection is S Wilton Place.


USC Digital Library

At the lower left of this close-up is the extant 4016 Wilshire, just mentioned by GW. That should mean that the houses above are 4032 and 4036 Wilshire.


Detail of picture above.

Another 1929 aerial taken just east of the one above shows the intersection of Wilshire and Western.


USC Digital Library

On the site where the Wiltern/Pellissier Building will be built a year or later is The Henry de Roulet Co., selling property in Pellissier Square (see GW's recent post).


USC Digital Library

On the northwest corner are the offices of another realtor, Kells & Grant. This shot is from 1927. Notice the real car on display in the box to the left.


USC Digital Library

Going back to the aerial shot, I was also intrigued by the two aircraft which are parked on the corner of Western and Ingraham. I was hoping that one of them might have made it to Bob's Air Mail Service Station at 5453 Wilshire (see BifRayRock's post #7493), but their designs look wrong.


Detail of picture above.
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  #21107  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 4:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post


I don't remember seeing this 1929 aerial before. The main street is Wilshire and the staggered intersection is S Wilton Place.


USC Digital Library

At the lower left of this close-up is the extant 4016 Wilshire, just mentioned by GW. That should mean that the houses above are 4032 and 4036 Wilshire.


Detail of picture above.
Well, I think you're exactly right, Hoss. The street ending at Wilshire is Van Ness. Also I think you can see 4032 actually straddles a lot line on the east side, being built on a lot and a half. The coming flower shop, I believe, will occupy the remaining (eastern) half of that lot, leaving one full lot between it and 4016.
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  #21108  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 5:44 PM
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[QUOTE=MichaelRyerson;6555175]Looking west down Wilshire Boulevard between Wilton Place and Van Ness, 1960

I love the names of the cross streets painted in huge letters on the street itself. From the air, you could look down and read Wilshire like a map.
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  #21109  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 7:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post


I don't remember seeing this 1929 aerial before. The main street is Wilshire and the staggered intersection is S Wilton Place.


USC Digital Library

On the south (left) side of Wilshire in this aerial, the houses are, from bottom, 3944, 3950, 3968, 3974, 3986, 4016, 4032, 4036, 4040. On the north side are the real estate office of Frank D. Tatum & Co. at the NE corner of Wilton with 645 S. Wilton at the NW corner, followed by two houses that have proved tough to research--right now I believe they were numbered 4005 and 4011 Wilshire. (In my notes, I have that, among the odd things about these houses are their short stays on Wilshire--they seem to have been built, or moved to, their lots after 1921 and been gone in perhaps less than 10 years. By 1935, a Pacific System Homes demo building was on the lot of 4005; 4011 was the real estate office of Ray C. Burton in 1934, at least until it disappeared...the timing of building and business comings and goings is tough to parse on the NE corner of Wilton.) At the NW corner of Van Ness is 4031 Wilshire, with 4037 next door.

The houses I've posted on my Wilshire site so far are linked to their stories.



LAT Nov 24, 1935

Has anyone seen a good photograph of this structure?

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Nov 6, 2016 at 2:01 PM.
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  #21110  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 9:29 PM
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Does anyone recognize this tiny trolley stop?


ebay

There appears to be a sheltered bench and news stand on the left and a greasy spoon featuring hotdogs on the right.
There's a slight curve in the track.




detail/news stand, bench





hotdog stand

detail
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  #21111  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 10:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Does anyone recognize this tiny trolley stop?


ebay

There appears to be a sheltered bench and news stand on the left and a greasy spoon featuring hotdogs on the right.
There's a slight curve in the track.

This looks like the end of the line for the P car at Dozier and Rowan in Boyle Heights.
____________
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  #21112  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post
The Flats is the area of Los Angeles primarily bounded by the Los Angeles River, 101 Freeway, and the 6th Street Bridge.
ER posted this nice map about a month ago (thanks ER). The population center of the area is mostly located on the east side of the river.



By the turn of the twentieth century, The Flats had already become an area where new immigrants moved to work at jobs near the river.
This area was the location of small industrial enterprises, livestock related businesses and the rail yards. These low wage workers lived
primarily in house courts, which usually included three or more habitations on one lot, with the unoccupied portion (and any utilities) shared by everyone.
(before)

Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff

(after)

Fugitive Plans in the Provisional City, Slums and Public Housing in Los Angeles by Dana Cuff
Very interesting post on the Flats FredH.

The area was also known as the Russian Flats. (-populated by spiritual dissidents called Molokans) Eventually many of the Russians/Molokans
moved to a nearby area they called "Kara-kala". (see the map below)


http://molokane.org/molokan/History/Boyle_Heights/

-here's a description

http://molokane.org/molokan/History/Boyle_Heights/



....some views of Russian Flats & "Kara-kala".



http://molokane.org/molokan/History/Boyle_Heights/

right: Klubnikin Bros. Store
left: Shubin Prayer House, commonly called Podval Church because the door at street level entered into a step-down half basement. Podval is Russian for basement. (I just found a comment that says these two building were across the street from the Aliso redevelopment)

The church building was destroyed by fire in the 1970s.





http://molokane.org/molokan/History/...king_House.jpg

Loading dock at the Klubnikin Packing House (no address)
-big cow, well half a cow anyway.



below: Shubin's Market (no exact address)


http://molokane.org/molokan/History/Boyle_Heights/






The "Big Church" in 1946. (on Lorena Street)

http://www.molokane.org/taxonomy/




"Sign at the old cemetery, in 1980". 2nd Street near Eastern Avenue.



*Molokans were also known. oddly enough, as Jumpers.
http://www.molokane.org/taxonomy/
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 27, 2014 at 11:47 PM.
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  #21113  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2014, 11:43 PM
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-is this a futile attempt to keep out all that Los Angeles smog?


www.wikipedia.org

-germaphobe Howard Hughes equipped this 1954 Chrysler New Yorker with an aircraft-grade air filtration system which took up the
entire trunk.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 28, 2014 at 12:03 AM.
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  #21114  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 12:30 AM
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Black movie stars in Los Angeles....

Lincoln Theodore Monroe Andrew Perry (May 30, 1902 – November 19, 1985), better known by the stage name Stepin Fetchit, was an American comedian and film actor.
Perry parlayed the Fetchit persona into a successful film career, eventually becoming a millionaire, the first black actor in history to do so. He was the first black actor to receive featured screen credit in a film.



MGM

In the movies, Stepin' Fetchit was a down-home country boy, dressed in rags and farm overalls. He epitomized the mumbling, shuffling, buck-eyed buffoon who acted like he didn't know his a-- from a hole in the ground. On the other hand, Lincoln Perry was a man of ostentatiousness, if not downright style. In real life, he was the new high-steppin', hip dressin' fella who had it all togetha while wearing custom designed and imported cashmere suits, some costing as much as $1000 a piece. Much of his wardrobe was reported to have been purchased (and retailored) directly from Rudolph Valentino's tailor after the death of the 20's movie icon in 1926. Lincoln Perry often referred to himself in such a way that clearly elevated him among the elite of Hollywood and something more than what society and the entertainment industry confined him to. Unfortunately, the free-wheeling spending and recklessness would eventually catch up with him. Doesn't it always? But for awhile, Perry and his chauffers, Fred and Phillip, were permanent fixtures throughout South Central in his late 20's Cadillac Phaeton.


MGM
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  #21115  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 12:49 AM
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Art Deco Documentary


USC archive


As a longtime fan and contributor to this thread, I'm asking for everyone's help on a project I'm undertaking. I am a 4K TV Producer, meaning we shoot television in the new UHD 3840x2160 format which gives us incredible pictures. For our next program, we're doing a documentary about Art Deco in L.A.

I've compiled a list of buildings we want to shoot and would love feedback about any egregious omissions or anything you think isn't worth the time. As I write this I realize I forgot the MayCo building on Wilshire and Fairfax. Anyway for now, here's my list:

1. South Pasadena High School, 1401 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, 1906
2. Venice High School, 13000 Venice Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1911
3. Ravenswood Apartments, 570 North Rossmore Avenue, Hollywood, 1912
4. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, 3911 South Figueroa Street, 1921
5. Park Plaza Hotel, 607 Park View Street, Los Angeles, 1923–24
6. Southern California Gas Company Complex, 820 S. Flower Street, Los Angeles, 1925
7. Los Angeles Central Library, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, 1926
8. Sears, Roebuck & Company Mail Order Building, 2650 E. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, 1927
9. Glenarm Power Plant, 43 East State, Pasadena, 1927
10. James Oviatt Building, 617 S. Olive St.,, Los Angeles, 1927
11. Charmont Apartments, 330 California Ave, Santa Monica, 1928
12. Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles (Martin and Parkinson, 1928)
13. Hollywood & Western Building, 5504 Hollywood Boulevard, , Hollywood, 1928
14. Garfield Building, 403 W. 8th St., Los Angeles (Claud Beelman, 1928–29)
15. Social and Public Art Resource Center, (SPARC Building) 650 Venice Blvd., Venice, 1929
16. Bullocks Wilshire, 3050 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles (The Parkinsons, 1929)
17. Richfield Tower, 555 S. Flower St., Los Angeles (demolished) (Stiles O. Clements, 1929)
18. Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd, Beverly Hills, 1930
19. Montecito Apartments, 6650 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood, 1930
20. Title Guarantee and Trust Company Building, 401-411 W. 5th StLos Angeles, 1930
21. Eastern Columbia Building, 849 S. Broadway, Los Angeles (Claud Beelman, 1930)
22. Wiltern Theatre (in the Pellissier Building), 3790 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles (Stiles O. Clements, 1931)
23. Dominguez-Wilshire Building 5410 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles (Morgan, Walls & Clements), 1931
24. Sunset Tower, 8358 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles (Leland Bryant, 1931)
25. Los Angeles County - USC Medical Center, 1200 N State St. Los Angeles, 1933
26. Santa Anita Park, Arcadia, 1934
27. Pan-Pacific Auditorium, 7600 W. Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, California, 1935
28. Los Angeles Times Building, 202 West 1st Street Los Angeles, 1935
29. Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles (John C. Austin, preliminary sketches by Russell W. Porter, 1935)
30. Crossroads of the World, 6671 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, 1936
31. El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 1936
32. U.S. Post Office Hollywood Main, 1615 N. Wilcox Ave. Hollywood, 1937
33. Fox Bruin Theater, 926 Broxton Avenue Los Angeles, 1937
34. Firestone Tire Building, 800 S. La Brea, Los Angeles, 1937
35. Black Cat Tavern, 3909 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, 1939
36. Hollywood Bowl Muse Fountain, 1939
37. Burbank City Hall, 275 E. Olive Ave.Burbank, 1943
38. Roxy Theatre, 9009 W Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, 1973
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  #21116  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 1:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinW View Post

As a longtime fan and contributor to this thread, I'm asking for everyone's help on a project I'm undertaking. I am a 4K TV Producer, meaning we shoot television in the new UHD 3840x2160 format which gives us incredible pictures. For our next program, we're doing a documentary about Art Deco in L.A.

I've compiled a list of buildings we want to shoot and would love feedback about any egregious omissions or anything you think isn't worth the time. As I write this I realize I forgot the MayCo building on Wilshire and Fairfax.
Here's a couple more that are still standing:

The Mauretania, 520-522 N. Rossmore Avenue:


LAPL, originally posted by gsjansen in post #1940

Bankers Building (now International Center), 629 S. Hill Street (Claude Beelman, 1930):


GSV, originally posted by Fab Fifties Fan in post #4802

If you're including demolished buildings, then you should include the likes of Coulters on Wilshire and the NBC Radio City studios at Sunset and Vine.

I'll add more if I remember them.
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  #21117  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 1:22 AM
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I'm no expert on the subject, but that looks like a good list, KevinW. A few additions come to mind right now. The E. Clem Wilson building at Wilshire and La Brea is certainly significant, although sadly its bottom floors have been rebuilt, and its crown covered up by that Samsung sign. Right next door, the black and gold Security First National Bank might deserve a spot too.
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  #21118  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 1:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinW View Post

USC archive


As a longtime fan and contributor to this thread, I'm asking for everyone's help on a project I'm undertaking. I am a 4K TV Producer, meaning we shoot television in the new UHD 3840x2160 format which gives us incredible pictures. For our next program, we're doing a documentary about Art Deco in L.A.

I've compiled a list of buildings we want to shoot and would love feedback about any egregious omissions or anything you think isn't worth the time. As I write this I realize I forgot the MayCo building on Wilshire and Fairfax. Anyway for now, here's my list:

1. South Pasadena High School, 1401 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, 1906
2. Venice High School, 13000 Venice Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1911
3. Ravenswood Apartments, 570 North Rossmore Avenue, Hollywood, 1912
4. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, 3911 South Figueroa Street, 1921
5. Park Plaza Hotel, 607 Park View Street, Los Angeles, 1923–24
6. Southern California Gas Company Complex, 820 S. Flower Street, Los Angeles, 1925
7. Los Angeles Central Library, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, 1926
8. Sears, Roebuck & Company Mail Order Building, 2650 E. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, 1927
9. Glenarm Power Plant, 43 East State, Pasadena, 1927
10. James Oviatt Building, 617 S. Olive St.,, Los Angeles, 1927
11. Charmont Apartments, 330 California Ave, Santa Monica, 1928
12. Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles (Martin and Parkinson, 1928)
13. Hollywood & Western Building, 5504 Hollywood Boulevard, , Hollywood, 1928
14. Garfield Building, 403 W. 8th St., Los Angeles (Claud Beelman, 1928–29)
15. Social and Public Art Resource Center, (SPARC Building) 650 Venice Blvd., Venice, 1929
16. Bullocks Wilshire, 3050 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles (The Parkinsons, 1929)
17. Richfield Tower, 555 S. Flower St., Los Angeles (demolished) (Stiles O. Clements, 1929)
18. Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd, Beverly Hills, 1930
19. Montecito Apartments, 6650 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood, 1930
20. Title Guarantee and Trust Company Building, 401-411 W. 5th StLos Angeles, 1930
21. Eastern Columbia Building, 849 S. Broadway, Los Angeles (Claud Beelman, 1930)
22. Wiltern Theatre (in the Pellissier Building), 3790 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles (Stiles O. Clements, 1931)
23. Dominguez-Wilshire Building 5410 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles (Morgan, Walls & Clements), 1931
24. Sunset Tower, 8358 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles (Leland Bryant, 1931)
25. Los Angeles County - USC Medical Center, 1200 N State St. Los Angeles, 1933
26. Santa Anita Park, Arcadia, 1934
27. Pan-Pacific Auditorium, 7600 W. Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, California, 1935
28. Los Angeles Times Building, 202 West 1st Street Los Angeles, 1935
29. Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles (John C. Austin, preliminary sketches by Russell W. Porter, 1935)
30. Crossroads of the World, 6671 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, 1936
31. El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 1936
32. U.S. Post Office Hollywood Main, 1615 N. Wilcox Ave. Hollywood, 1937
33. Fox Bruin Theater, 926 Broxton Avenue Los Angeles, 1937
34. Firestone Tire Building, 800 S. La Brea, Los Angeles, 1937
35. Black Cat Tavern, 3909 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, 1939
36. Hollywood Bowl Muse Fountain, 1939
37. Burbank City Hall, 275 E. Olive Ave.Burbank, 1943
38. Roxy Theatre, 9009 W Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, 1973
39. The Edison Building
40. The Federal Building
41. The Selig Retail Building (3rd Street and Western Avenue)
42. Union Station

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Apr 28, 2014 at 2:37 AM.
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  #21119  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 2:53 AM
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I didn't know, until tonight, that the Paris Inn had it's own wine label.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/CHATEAU-PARI...item4ad458bbd0
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  #21120  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2014, 3:28 AM
ProphetM ProphetM is offline
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Quote:
41. The Selig Retail Building (3rd Street and Western Avenue)
This one especially can give a tiny hint of the fantasticness that was lost when they tore down the Richfield Building.
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