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  #25521  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:57 AM
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Riverwalk

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  #25522  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:48 AM
BrinChi BrinChi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeg1985 View Post
I like this idea. But how exactly would you tax the developers on the carbon of the building they are building will produce in the future? A typical carbon tax would say that they have to pay a tax on any carbon out put from the construction of the building. Whomever owns the building would have to worry about taxes after it is built. I'm not sure this would get the outcomes that were are aiming for but maybe you can elaborate.
Here is a pretty good synopsis of a carbon tax. With a tax like this in place, energy production would become more eco-friendly over time, and/or consumption would go down as a higher price provides the incentive to economize. With the higher energy prices, building owners would automatically demand more energy efficient buildings than they would have otherwise -- this could look like a super efficient central air system, more efficient windows, better insulation, etc... all more expensive up front, but worth the cost savings down the road. No cookie-cutter rule/regulation solutions necessary.

Anyways, sorry to get a little off topic.
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  #25523  
Old Posted Yesterday, 3:36 PM
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Harry, your awesome. Great pics with some great "scenery" in the background.
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  #25524  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:50 PM
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I forget if this one was already posted: 1018 N Larrabee. 9 units and retail.


Next phase of Parkside on Division: 106 units


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  #25525  
Old Posted Yesterday, 6:57 PM
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Pretty surprising! Thanks as always Spyguy.
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  #25526  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:10 PM
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Nice, spyguy. Thanks.

So this phase is pretty exciting. Here's an aerial of the site from the architect's website:



I believe it's "The Cleveland" in the original site plan from the developer?



Clearly, the architecture is a huge upgrade from the bullshit Holsten Real Estate Development had been peddling. Not sure what finally made them see the light, but I guess we should be thankful that it happened at all.

Let's hope Landon Bone Baker is their new baseline for the rest of the development (i.e., "The Hobbie" and all the structures too small to get a name).
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  #25527  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:18 PM
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BTW, looking at all these aerials, I have to ask: Was the City so desperate for redevelopment of the former Cabrini Green lands that they just said "fuck it" to establishing a rational street grid and let developers run wild? Because, Jesus, what a mess.
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  #25528  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:29 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
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^. I'm really happy to see the redesign of the newer phases if the Parkside. Agree that the earlier phase looks like shit.

All in all the street grid is intact, so i don't see the issue
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  #25529  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ch.G, Ch.G View Post
BTW, looking at all these aerials, I have to ask: Was the City so desperate for redevelopment of the former Cabrini Green lands that they just said "fuck it" to establishing a rational street grid and let developers run wild? Because, Jesus, what a mess.
The original grid is still there. They just Hanover Parkerized it in order to shoehorn in as many townhomes as they can.

Trash pickup and snow removal are gonna be a nightmare in these parking lots.
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  #25530  
Old Posted Today, 12:25 AM
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A) Landon Bone Baker has always been the architect for ParkSide, but they had some turnover during the recession and successfully argued for a change in design direction (more billable hours, you know).

B) I agree that the street grid has been royally screwed, but the fault belongs to the Cabrini era, not the present. The planning goals in the current era have always called for restoring the street grid, but those planners were unable to overrule large institutions like CPD (the cops), CPD (the parks), and CPS who continue to advocate for "campus" style street closures at sites around the city. Usually these guys see neighborhood support for these closures as a way to reduce the vague evil of "cut-through traffic", even as they further congest the main streets and confuse outsiders.

C) The most recent draft of the Cabrini plan calls for more new street openings, and I think they will be more successful in the future. The most important streets will be Oak in the east-west direction and Cleveland in the north-south direction. Oak is just a matter of repaving a few blocks between Hudson and Orleans, and Cleveland will be entirely in the hands of CHA planners at the Cabrini Rowhomes site who will do the same street grid like ParkSide.

C) Townhouse developments and all other developments more than 6 units pay for private trash collection and snow removal on private streets.
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  #25531  
Old Posted Today, 12:32 AM
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One of the recurring issues with Chicago's 330- by 660-foot grid is that it doesn't support sufficient density in townhouses or non-elevator/non highrise code buildings. A century ago, this was solved by having rear dwellings, as you still sometimes see in Old Town or Pilsen. But in the modern era, we end up resorting to all kinds of variations on parking courts, mewses, laneways, and units fronting pedestrian paths to get sufficient density to justify the land costs. You can see lots of examples on the ground in the Lincoln Park neighborhood, Dearborn Park II, and University Village.
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  #25532  
Old Posted Today, 12:59 AM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
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^. Chinatown as well.

I for one find this phenomenon a very "Chicago" thing, something I haven't really seen elsewhere. It creates a lot of housing variety, allowing for privacy while still having dwellings that properly address the street. My only beef is what lengths this city goes to to accommodate the car.
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  #25533  
Old Posted Today, 1:01 AM
Link N. Parker Link N. Parker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
^ For FUCKS SAKE, does anybody even read posts any more?

The very post you just quoted describes an adaptive reuse of an existing building, and here you are complaining about it being torn down.

Anyhow, I'm glad they are rehabbing that old property. That burgeoning little district needs to keep some of the old Chicago feel...

RELAX, I was on call that day and only had time to skim thru articles at the time.

Either way, I am glad that it is a reuse.
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  #25534  
Old Posted Today, 1:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
^. I'm really happy to see the redesign of the newer phases if the Parkside. Agree that the earlier phase looks like shit.

All in all the street grid is intact, so i don't see the issue
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKDickman View Post
The original grid is still there. They just Hanover Parkerized it in order to shoehorn in as many townhomes as they can.

Trash pickup and snow removal are gonna be a nightmare in these parking lots.
I don't think I was very clear. I had in mind both Cabrini Green and its environs. South of Division, west of Lasalle, north of Chicago, and east the River the following happens:

Elm Street stops or starts no less than 9 times; Maple once; Hill twice; Wendell 4 times; Hobbie twice; Oak twice (I think; what is even going on between Kids Club Moody Church and Urban Village Church?); Walton twice; Locust 6 times; Chestnut 6 times; you get the idea, and, if you don't, just look at Google maps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
A) Landon Bone Baker has always been the architect for ParkSide, but they had some turnover during the recession and successfully argued for a change in design direction (more billable hours, you know).
Get out. Unless I'm mistaken, they've scrubbed the earlier phases from their website...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
B) I agree that the street grid has been royally screwed, but the fault belongs to the Cabrini era, not the present. The planning goals in the current era have always called for restoring the street grid, but those planners were unable to overrule large institutions like CPD (the cops), CPD (the parks), and CPS who continue to advocate for "campus" style street closures at sites around the city. Usually these guys see neighborhood support for these closures as a way to reduce the vague evil of "cut-through traffic", even as they further congest the main streets and confuse outsiders.
So the CPDs and CPS have recently foiled urban planners' attempts to impose some sort of order here? Doesn't that mean the fault belongs just as much to the 'current era,' as you describe it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
C) The most recent draft of the Cabrini plan calls for more new street openings, and I think they will be more successful in the future. The most important streets will be Oak in the east-west direction and Cleveland in the north-south direction. Oak is just a matter of repaving a few blocks between Hudson and Orleans, and Cleveland will be entirely in the hands of CHA planners at the Cabrini Rowhomes site who will do the same street grid like ParkSide.
As far as I can tell, Oak Street is the least fucked-up of the the east-west routes; the City would reach new levels of pathetic if it couldn't even iron out that kink.
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  #25535  
Old Posted Today, 2:01 AM
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Oak is officially vacated between Hudson and the alley west of Orleans, but still paved and used for parking. It is definitely possible to drive or walk through on Oak - there used to be a little chain barrier, but it was pretty much destroyed after the Cabrini highrises came down.

I'm trying to point out that CHA planners in recent years have had good intentions when it comes to the street grid - when they are in charge, we get something like ParkSide. But they don't control the cops, schools, or parks and those agencies' misguided ideas about urban planning.
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  #25536  
Old Posted Today, 2:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
I for one find this phenomenon a very "Chicago" thing, something I haven't really seen elsewhere. It creates a lot of housing variety, allowing for privacy while still having dwellings that properly address the street. My only beef is what lengths this city goes to to accommodate the car.
Eh, that's a pretty big beef to have if you ask me.

Moreover, cities should not be difficult to navigate; getting from point A to point B should be as easy as possible. Certainly, in many older cities, layers of historic architecture have been built around transit routes developed according to a more esoteric logic (at least by contemporary standards), and a more navigable city wouldn't necessarily be worth the destruction/reorganization. (Haussmann and his fans might beg to differ, of course.) But, IMO, there's not much of value in many former CHA lands even being sacrificed.

There are other considerations, too, like taking a public good and turning it into a de facto private one, which happens enough in Chicago even without adding a bunch of no outlet streets to the mix...
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  #25537  
Old Posted Today, 2:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Oak is officially vacated between Hudson and the alley west of Orleans, but still paved and used for parking. It is definitely possible to drive or walk through on Oak - there used to be a little chain barrier, but it was pretty much destroyed after the Cabrini highrises came down.

I'm trying to point out that CHA planners in recent years have had good intentions when it comes to the street grid - when they are in charge, we get something like ParkSide. But they don't control the cops, schools, or parks and those agencies' misguided ideas about urban planning.
No, I get it; I'm just thinking it's a shame the cops/schools/parks have been able to exert undue influence, especially considering these opportunities will not present themselves again.
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  #25538  
Old Posted Today, 5:44 AM
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James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jc5680 View Post
Progress at Notherly Island.



Photo by Nick Ulivieri, via a Blair Kamin tweet
Found the PDF for the plan for this park. Really cool stuff:
http://www.cpdit01.com/resources/pla...ork%20Plan.pdf

Based on the photo, though, looks like they're not building it exactly according to the plans from a couple years ago.
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  #25539  
Old Posted Today, 6:05 AM
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The US Army Corps of Engineers won't be done with the site until 2017, so there could be more earth moved. I'm guessing at least they're going to bury that land bar in the lagoon once they don't need truck access anymore.
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  #25540  
Old Posted Today, 9:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond Agent 007 View Post
Based on the photo, though, looks like they're not building it exactly according to the plans from a couple years ago.
It's a framework plan... they are building pieces as funding allows. In this case, the funding source is a grant from the Army Corps for habitat restoration. IIRC this grant is pretty small at about $5M and the scope of "habitat restoration" is pretty narrowly defined.

Hence, this project is mostly earthmoving and re-vegetating. To further keep costs down, the earthmoving balances cut and fill so that no soils are added or removed from the project site. The "park" elements of the site are not paid for with the Army Corps grant but with a small pot of local matching funds, so there aren't many of them - a few gravel paths, boardwalks, and a little bridge.

Other features will come in over time - George Lucas has already committed to funding a bridge connection to the island at Waldron Drive. I'm expecting the Park District to find a new use for the old Meigs terminal in the next few years as well.
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