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  #42421  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 4:58 AM
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5693 Spreading Oak Drive, Hollywood

In the lower right corner is 5693 Spreading Oak Drive, built in 1924 according to the LA County Assessor. At the right center edge
is 5694 Spreading Oak, also built in 1924 according to the Assessor. At lower left, I think the dead-end canyon is now Tuxedo Terrace:



"Hollywood Heights, Calif." c. 1920s at CA State Library


Here is 5693 Spreading Oak from the street.


Google Earth view:





Here I've marked 5694 Spreading Oak with a red dot:



Bing


This isn't exactly the same angle as the vintage photo, but you can see Tuxedo Terrace in the little canyon:



Google Earth
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  #42422  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
re: The garage next to the Huntington Park Sign Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post



Well, USL was a brand of car batteries--I think the sign says "Auto Electric Service" at top. I thought I might have found the building at at 1409 S Santa Fe, Coon's Auto Electric in this period...but no.


detail

I see what you're saying GW. (does the 'service' you mentioned appear at the very bottom of the sign or directly beneath 'electric'?)

I certainly didn't know USL was a type of car battery.

& I was just going to mention that the last letter might be a D instead of L
Unless it's just my imagination; there's a spotlight, or something, on the top end of the Delco sign that could be blocking part of the letter.

The lower horizontal part of the L has always looked too curved (upward) to me.
__





There serifs are pretty pronounced on the USL logo letters, accounting for the upswing on the "L"... also, I think it says SERVICE in both places--the clue might be in the too-fuzzy part just above "USL".... Well, there's a drugstore down the street, but its name is also too blurry.
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  #42423  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 3:30 PM
Rustifer Rustifer is offline
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Not Quite Famous Enough

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Originally Posted by HossC View Post


How's this? The picture below is from an article about Roger Smith's death in The Hollywood Reporter.


www.hollywoodreporter.com/Photofest
So I saw an old interview with Roger Smith that was done after the 77 Sunset Strip series had ended. It was his hope that after being a successful TV star for 5 years, a movie contract would logically follow. Not to be. He was told that he just didn't have enough "star power" to sell tickets. So he played guitar and sang at some of the bigger nightclub venues, hungry i in San Fran being one of them. Now THAT would have been something to see! He did get a small recording contract that kept him going until landing the title role in the short-lived Mr. Roberts tv series (it lasted only 1 year).

Shortly thereafter, he married Ann-Margret and found it not necessary to ever work again. I'm guessing he also found it not necessary to ever ogle another woman either.
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  #42424  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 3:44 PM
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Rare Episode 77 Sunset Strip

For those of you who are into 77 Sunset Strip re-runs and get MeTV on cable, an episode titled "Reserved For Mr. Bailey" is coming up next week. It is one of 30 episodes that never made it into the syndication loop, so it hasn't been seen in probably 50 years. Efrem Zimbalist Jr. (Stu Bailey) is the only actor in the episode, and is stuck in a creepy ghost town with some unseen killer trying to murder him.

I remember seeing it when it first aired in 1961 and only remember bits and pieces of the story. I'm going to DVR that puppy, then settle in with a couple of martinis at just the right time, you betcha.
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  #42425  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 6:45 PM
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Today's Julius Shulman subject was a lot easier to find. It's "Job 4485: Peter J. Holdstock, Ambassador College, Administration Building (Pasadena, Calif.), 1969".



Here's the opposite side.



The third and final shot shows what looks like an atrium.



All from Getty Research Institute

When I first checked the Google aerials views (one of which is below), I thought I was going to be posting about how the building had survived and was looking good.


Google Maps

That all changed when I tried to get a ground-level view, and found an empty space/construction site (GSV July 2016). It seems that the Administration Building was demolished in early 2016 to make way for a housing development. Here are a couple of articles:

Pasadena's Ambassador West Project is Back On - la.curbed.com, 2010

Long-delayed housing project in Pasadena will be ready in the fall - pasadenastarnews.com, 2013
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  #42426  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 6:53 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
In the lower right corner is 5693 Spreading Oak Drive, built in 1924 according to the LA County Assessor. At the right center edge
is 5694 Spreading Oak, also built in 1924 according to the Assessor. At lower left, I think the dead-end canyon is now Tuxedo Terrace:


"Hollywood Heights, Calif." c. 1920s at CA State Library
Good find Flyingwedge!

I tried to find some interior photographs of 5693 but came up empty.
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  #42427  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 7:52 PM
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I don't recall seeing this before. (but as most of you know, my memory is pretty bad)


"Los Angeles Railway (LARy) Garvanza Substation, 5000 Buchanan Street, near Highland Park, 1920"


https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrol...ive/2951183102

As far as I can tell, this is the only image of it on the internet.

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 14, 2017 at 8:06 PM.
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  #42428  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 7:54 PM
Cyndihdz Cyndihdz is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

Mystery building (but not for long!)


Can anyone identify this very familiar building? Edifice of higher learning??









Not Los Angeles High.
http://fitzla.files.wordpress.com/20...igh-school.jpg

nope
http://www.banninghs.org/pics/BHS_history.jpg

Scratch Loyola HS too.
http://ridley-thomas.lacounty.gov/Ar...yola-HiRes.jpg

John Burroughs Middle?
http://www.1400ml.com/jbclassof62/images/moonoverjb.jpg




Don' t know if anyone has answered your question, i'm a litle behind, ok alot behind on the posts, but could it be Southgate High School?
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  #42429  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 8:24 PM
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I'm hoping someone can dig up some additional information on this intriguing place. (like the street address)



Rice's Rock Fountain, Downey Cal.



here's the whole postcard.





Undivided Back (1901-1907)




*Did ya'll see the calla lilies in the photo?
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 14, 2017 at 8:56 PM.
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  #42430  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 9:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I'm hoping someone can dig up some additional information on this intriguing place. (like the street address)



Rice's Rock Fountain, Downey Cal.



here's the whole postcard.





Undivided Back (1901-1907)




*Did ya'll see the calla lilies in the photo?
__
Something creepy about this place....I guess this was before Health Laws.
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  #42431  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 10:01 PM
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I've been wondering what kind of books are in the bookcase on the right. They're awfully thick (more like manuals).

Even if the place was a pharmacy, you'd think the manuals would be in the back somewhere, not right next to the fountain.

That said, I still don't find the place particularly 'creepy' CBD.

_

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 14, 2017 at 10:15 PM.
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  #42432  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 10:30 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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I found this photo on a post of 20 Historic Photos of Love During Wartime.
It was the #1 top pick with the highest rating.


Bill Crouch

Caption: Korean War Goodbye Kiss, Los Angeles, Sept. 6, 1950.


The photo was taken by Bill Crouch of the Oakland Tribune. Bill Crouch won the Pulitzer Prize for another photo he took
that same year titled "Near Collision at Air Show." I haven't found any notations as to where that air show was located.
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  #42433  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 11:17 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Two slide-views of Taylor Yards in 1954.


eBay

I wasn't sure this was really 1954 until I spotted that car parked by the second tower. (red arrow below)


detail

-also note the Purina owned grain elevator (my hometown in Illinois had a Purina elevator as well)-easy to spot with the checkerboard paint job.








Then I found this second slide with numerous parked cars. (I take it they're railroad worker's cars)


eBay

I believe the large 'square' building on the hilltop/middle distance is part of Forest Lawn Glendale.
The Purena building was actually the Taylor Milling Co. who donated the land to the Southern Pacific to build the yard. That why it was called "Taylor Yard".

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42434  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2017, 11:43 PM
riichkay riichkay is offline
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I'd never heard this story....how was this not challenged on a Constitutional basis?




Mexican and Mexican-American families wait to board Mexico-bound trains in Los Angeles on March 8, 1932. County officials arranged these mass departures as part of “repatriation campaigns,” fueled by fears that Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were taking scarce jobs and government assistance during the Great Depression.

During the 1930s and into the 1940s, up to 2 million Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were deported or expelled from cities and towns across the U.S. and shipped to Mexico. According to some estimates, more than half of these people were U.S. citizens, born in the United States.


Interior photos on the same date:







And a lonely protester:

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  #42435  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 12:02 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Originally Posted by jg6544 View Post
No idea where this was taken, but the "aero-train" was the railroads' attempt to fix their problem without really doing anything more than making cosmetic changes. The problem was people were deserting the rails in droves for their cars and for trucks (for freight). Small wonder considering the money that was being thrown at highways (this was before the Interstate Highway System really got off the ground). So instead of pouring capital into modernized tracks and switching facilities; designated passenger lines, and express and local trackage, the railroads opted for a pretty new train. It went nowhere, so we're stuck with the wreckage that is the rail system in 99% of the country and the fact that we're decades behind Europe, Japan, and China when it comes to rail systems.
Actually to correct the record, the Aerotrain was designed by GM to utilize their bus bodies. Look closly at the first coach and you can see the resemblance to a bus. They rode rough and the passengers did not like them.

Now as to the decline in rail passenger traffic, it has allway been the business traveler who comprised 80 to 85 percent of the traveling public. When airplanes became faster thats where the business traveler went.

The rail systems in Europe, Japan and China are all nationalized and not paid for out of the fair box, but all maintained by the taxpayer.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42436  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 4:45 AM
jbange jbange is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyndihdz View Post
Don' t know if anyone has answered your question, i'm a litle behind, ok alot behind on the posts, but could it be Southgate High School?
Yep. Definitely South Gate High School:


southgatehigh.org
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  #42437  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 6:08 AM
sadykadie2 sadykadie2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riichkay View Post
I'd never heard this story....how was this not challenged on a Constitutional basis?




Mexican and Mexican-American families wait to board Mexico-bound trains in Los Angeles on March 8, 1932. County officials arranged these mass departures as part of “repatriation campaigns,” fueled by fears that Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were taking scarce jobs and government assistance during the Great Depression.

During the 1930s and into the 1940s, up to 2 million Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were deported or expelled from cities and towns across the U.S. and shipped to Mexico. According to some estimates, more than half of these people were U.S. citizens, born in the United States.


Interior photos on the same date:







And a lonely protester:

I would love to call this post "Everything Old is New Again"
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  #42438  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 8:22 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post


"Hollywood Heights, Calif." c. 1920s at CA State Library
I don't know when "Hollywood Heights" was renamed "Los Feliz Oaks". Apparently Los Feliz had more cachet over time than Hollywood. When Fred Engstrum built Aremesia up there in 1913, its driveway (now Valley Oak Dr) branched off from Canyon and was just about the only thing there:

Most of the streets are called "(something) Oak":

the oaks homeowners association


google maps



Los Angeles Herald, Number 154, 23 March 1912





https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=...hts%22-------1

More info here, here and here.

Digressing more than a little, for some interesting background on Laughlin Park (as Laughlin Hill became) and Homer Laughlin's hopes for it, Irving Gill's and Lloyd Wright's involvement, John Crosse has done the homework here.

Looking north over Laughlin Park in 1937, with the Japanese nurseries climbing the slopes of the Hollywood Hills below the Observatory:

hollywood photographs (detail)

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 15, 2017 at 6:25 PM.
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  #42439  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 3:28 PM
DViator DViator is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Thanks for your help Hoss...

but I'm not sure that I'm 100% convinced yet. Even if the photograph was taken on the far right end of the building that you pointed out, the angle of the 'tower' is a bit off (in my opinion)

To me, it seems the building in question (rainier/tacoma) would almost have to be on the opposite side of the street (red line, below)
because we see the side of the Central Manufacturing Warehouse in the original photo (the side that's parallel to the red line)


detail/usc

but I certainly think you're in the right ballpark Hoss.
__


Oh, one more thing: (my Columbo impersonation )

Doesn't the tower appear too close to the end of the building...instead of in the middle where it should be.

detail

Or is it just a matter of perspective?
I think Hoss is right. In your original image we're looking at the front of the CMW building (the tower and the portion to the right). If you look at the sign structure, under the Rainier Beer sign farthest to the left and to the left of the Tacoma Beer sign on that end, you can see the edge of the barn-like structure on the roof (to the right of the tower).
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  #42440  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2017, 3:57 PM
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Originally Posted by jbange View Post

Yep. Definitely South Gate High School:


southgatehigh.org
I'm guessing that this is the same building, but someone in its history obviously didn't like the brick finish. The top floor and roof above the entrance have also been modified.


GSV/Joshua Wrye

For search purposes: 3351 Firestone Boulevard, South Gate.
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