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  #47261  
Old Posted May 9, 2020, 11:41 PM
RedCorsair87 RedCorsair87 is offline
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My clients have that penthouse corner unit facing south east. Stunning views of the skyline.

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  #47262  
Old Posted May 10, 2020, 12:29 PM
OhioGuy OhioGuy is offline
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I live a few blocks away and walk by it often. There still isn't any ground floor retail, but it's been such a nice transformation nonetheless. Just to the northeast on the other side of Broadway from this rehab is where Cedar Street is planning on further development at 5083 and 5063 North Broadway (not sure what the current economic situation will do to those plans). https://chicago.curbed.com/2018/4/3/...way-apartments

Plus there's the redevelopment directly across the street of 5035 North Broadway into TimeLine Theatre's new home. https://www.uptownupdate.com/2018/12...purchases.html

So it will be interesting to see this stretch of Broadway by the end of the decade, when presumably much of this redevelopment will be completed along with the completely rebuilt red line viaduct, underpasses, and Argyle station.
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  #47263  
Old Posted May 10, 2020, 5:26 PM
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15 N Elizabeth - another Miller Hull project for Ranquist

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  #47264  
Old Posted May 10, 2020, 6:36 PM
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Triben Tower Rehab

May 7

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  #47265  
Old Posted May 10, 2020, 8:07 PM
rivernorthlurker rivernorthlurker is offline
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May 7

Feels like this is moving at a glacial pace.
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  #47266  
Old Posted May 11, 2020, 2:44 PM
Natoma Natoma is offline
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15 N Elizabeth - another Miller Hull project for Ranquist

You ever notice that they roll out the uber lux renderings whenever they want to demolish something historic? This would take the place of two great rowhouses/walk-ups.

https://goo.gl/maps/12hqod7Z4w7mS53Y6
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  #47267  
Old Posted May 11, 2020, 2:52 PM
marothisu marothisu is offline
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You ever notice that they roll out the uber lux renderings whenever they want to demolish something historic? This would take the place of two great rowhouses/walk-ups.

https://goo.gl/maps/12hqod7Z4w7mS53Y6
If I'm not mistaken, the historic buildings were recently demolished.
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  #47268  
Old Posted May 11, 2020, 3:06 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
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You ever notice that they roll out the uber lux renderings whenever they want to demolish something historic? This would take the place of two great rowhouses/walk-ups.
Ranquist is pretty high end, so I'd expect the final product to look like the renderings...

also, old does not mean historic
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  #47269  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 10:23 AM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
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So I just saw someone in Facebook claim that the antenna on 1000 Lake Shore Drive was not actually dismantled, but blew off in a storm after years of disuse with parts of it landing on the beach across the drive. Is that total nonsense or true? They said they remember riding a bus on the drive and seeing a chunk of it embedded or stabbed into the sand.
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  #47270  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 4:39 PM
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^That seems pretty unlikely—but I don't know how to completely disprove such a claim.

Chicago Tribune archives include no mention of any such incident.
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  #47271  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 5:17 PM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
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Yeah seems pretty dubious to me and no mention of it elsewhere online. Perhaps there is a seed of truth to it like that a piece of it or some equipment got blown off of it one time. Maybe that happened and this guy is remembering it as "the antenna fell off". Maybe a bit did blow off of it and then the city made them take the whole mast down?

Do you know when they took the mast down? Apparently the reason the penthouse is so huge on this building was to house the transmitter equipment. Would be interesting to explore the penthouse of this building and see what they are doing with that space today.
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  #47272  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 9:07 PM
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WTTW moved its transmitter to the Sears Tower mast in 1974, I think, but that doesn't mean they took down their old antenna immediately. And it might well have been subsequently leased out for two-way radio or similar use. I'm pretty sure I can see it in the 1972 aerials, but probably not in the 1983 aerials.
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  #47273  
Old Posted May 13, 2020, 11:17 PM
Darude_Sandstorm Darude_Sandstorm is offline
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Originally Posted by west-town-brad View Post
Ranquist is pretty high end, so I'd expect the final product to look like the renderings...

also, old does not mean historic
The old vs historic bit is rather pedantic and misses the point. I'm hurt by perhaps most of the demolitions in Chicago, but I looked at the buildings that will be demolished here and they don't do enough for me to miss them at all.
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  #47274  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 2:16 AM
marothisu marothisu is offline
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The old vs historic bit is rather pedantic and misses the point. I'm hurt by perhaps most of the demolitions in Chicago, but I looked at the buildings that will be demolished here and they don't do enough for me to miss them at all.
There have been some demolitions that hurt, but there's also a lot that are completely forgettable. A lot more probably than people even realize. Doing the map that I do for new construction permits has made me realize this. Houses like this are a dime a dozen in the midwest. And to be completely honest, I think what replaced it looks a bit better.

At the end of the day though, some of these get torn down because the buildings are in pretty bad shape to begin with which costs more to fix than to just tear it down and building something new. That needs to be taken into account. Buildings are old and when you don't take care of a lot of old buildings, they are going to deteriorate into a mess. I'm not saying all of them are like this but I think that people just assume all these buildings are in amazing shape and are simple to fix.
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  #47275  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 9:01 AM
Darude_Sandstorm Darude_Sandstorm is offline
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
There have been some demolitions that hurt, but there's also a lot that are completely forgettable. A lot more probably than people even realize. Doing the map that I do for new construction permits has made me realize this. Houses like this are a dime a dozen in the midwest. And to be completely honest, I think what replaced it looks a bit better.

At the end of the day though, some of these get torn down because the buildings are in pretty bad shape to begin with which costs more to fix than to just tear it down and building something new. That needs to be taken into account. Buildings are old and when you don't take care of a lot of old buildings, they are going to deteriorate into a mess. I'm not saying all of them are like this but I think that people just assume all these buildings are in amazing shape and are simple to fix.
Yeah that was poor word choice. I guess I meant most that get flagged by preservationists. And I think there's something to be said about the ways in which some buildings find themselves in a state of disrepair. I have no idea how often it happens but intentional neglect is a thing.
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  #47276  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 2:36 PM
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speaking of preservation/lack thereof, theres an article in the Trib about this restored former dairy in LP which of course is getting torn down for some 3 lot concrete mansion. incredibly sad, the photos and history of what the owners did with this place is inspiring

https://www.chicagotribune.com/colum...mbu-story.html

https://www.zumper.com/apartments-fo...ark-chicago-il

im not against all teardowns, but stuff like this really hurts. and yes, i know that neighborhood has already irrevocably changed. but this mindset (aka paying 6 MIL simply to tear down a well preserved existing property) is some real end of rome shit
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  #47277  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 2:54 PM
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speaking of preservation/lack thereof, theres an article in the Trib about this restored former dairy in LP which of course is getting torn down for some 3 lot concrete mansion. incredibly sad, the photos and history of what the owners did with this place is inspiring

https://www.chicagotribune.com/colum...mbu-story.html

https://www.zumper.com/apartments-fo...ark-chicago-il

im not against all teardowns, but stuff like this really hurts. and yes, i know that neighborhood has already irrevocably changed.
That's... insane. That's a beautiful, historical house with plenty of potential for updates to fit someones personal style. I've never understood these types of teardowns... If they want a massive 3-lot mansion, why not buy a lot that doesn't currently have a structure like this on it? Even if you're completely oblivious to culture, history, and sense of place, why not save some money on demo...

It's crazy that shit like this is allowed, but zoning prevents multi-family from being built in the majority of the city.

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but this mindset (aka paying 6 MIL simply to tear down a well preserved existing property) is some real end of rome shit
Totally.
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  #47278  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 3:08 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Via Chicago View Post
speaking of preservation/lack thereof, theres an article in the Trib about this restored former dairy in LP which of course is getting torn down for some 3 lot concrete mansion. incredibly sad, the photos and history of what the owners did with this place is inspiring

https://www.chicagotribune.com/colum...mbu-story.html

https://www.zumper.com/apartments-fo...ark-chicago-il

im not against all teardowns, but stuff like this really hurts. and yes, i know that neighborhood has already irrevocably changed. but this mindset (aka paying 6 MIL simply to tear down a well preserved existing property) is some real end of rome shit
Great to see the owners cashed out their 30+ year personal investment.
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  #47279  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 4:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natoma View Post
You ever notice that they roll out the uber lux renderings whenever they want to demolish something historic? This would take the place of two great rowhouses/walk-ups.

https://goo.gl/maps/12hqod7Z4w7mS53Y6
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
If I'm not mistaken, the historic buildings were recently demolished.
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Originally Posted by Darude_Sandstorm View Post
The old vs historic bit is rather pedantic and misses the point. I'm hurt by perhaps most of the demolitions in Chicago, but I looked at the buildings that will be demolished here and they don't do enough for me to miss them at all.
It stinks that we are tearing down ANY viable older building stock when we have empty lots and dilapidated buildings and parking lots still all over this city. I get it if there's a big density swap, like from a 3 flat to a 30 story building, but this just seems wasteful and unnecessary.
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  #47280  
Old Posted May 14, 2020, 5:28 PM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
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Honestly guys, the Dairy and those mutilated two flats are not the biggest problem here. Those buildings pale in comparison to the endless parade of excellent prewar stock all over the South and West side that is mercilessly plowed under on a daily basis. When you see greystone 3 flats biting the dust all over Garfield and Lawndale and Englewood, I'm really not concerned about a Chicago common building that is only relevant at all because it had an interesting historical use.

To me the main outrage of stuff like the Dairy is the sheer wastefulness of it. It's a perfectly serviceable building and now all those finishes are going to wind up in the landfill.
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