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  #2341  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2010, 2:45 PM
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Merry Chistmas

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  #2342  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2010, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Madame Whatever lived in house #3


LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics40/00054852.jpg


I don't think I had ever heard of Helena Modjeska--and frankly still wouldn't be much interested in her unnoirish self if not for her real estate on an island I'd also never heard of--before a friend sent me this L.A. Times article of December 5:

http://articles.latimes.com/2010/dec...-then-20101205

Modjeska was a noted Shakesperean actress of the time....and in the days before movies, TV, Grand Theft Auto - San Andreas and the Wii, being a famous stage actress was about as famous as one could be. She also built a home in the Santa Ana Mountains, now a State Historical Park, and the nearby canyon is now also named for her

I did happen to catch this wonderful tidbit from the LA Times article ---

....Pretty though they might be, the houses lacked indoor plumbing and electricity. The sewage drained directly into the bay, and swimmers had to keep a sharp eye out for any "foreign objects" that floated by....

A comment so typical of the juvenile, snarky, hipster-doofuses at The Times. Readers here are knowledgeable enough to know that lack of indoor plumbing - and all that goes with it - was often par for the course in 1900. But not for the sheltered brats who man the keyboards at the Old Gray Lady of Spring Street, who think that's just so funny, in their adolescent way.

I SO hate that fish wrap. Editorial concluded.

Last edited by malumot; Jun 12, 2011 at 2:42 PM.
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  #2343  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2010, 9:04 PM
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Shooting Shockproof



Looking up 2nd from Olive toward Grand -- The Dome, of course, looming o'er.



Douglas Sirk & Co shooting "Shockproof," 1949. From the Times' "Daily Mirror" LA history blog -- http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/thed...-photo-16.html
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  #2344  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2010, 11:56 PM
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This Was Pacific Electric

A few evocative screen captures from the excellent This Was Pacific Electric:



Pacific Electric Building, 2002


A detail






Red Car arriving at the Catalina ferry


Arroyo Seco/Pasadena/Arroyo Seco Freeway


Arroyo Seco/Pasadena/Arroyo Seco Freeway


Hollywood Freeway


Ramona Parkway


Remnants: A Red Car at the great Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris







In West L.A., foamer extraordinaire Ralph Cantos, featured in the DVD and extras. He's a man who probably
knows more about L.A. rail archeology than anyone. He's way ahead of all of us here.



A few more of the PE remnants Ralph visits:





Trolley-wire support bolt, downtown


Buses now use this old PE shelter in Pasadena


Cantos refers to the freeway that supplanted the PE line to Glendale over these abandoned
trestles as the "Golden Mistake Freeway," such is his fervor for old L.A. rails.




All photos from This Was Pacific Electric, written and directed by Thom Eberhardt. Sky City Productions, Inc.: www.skycityproductions.com

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Mar 6, 2013 at 1:45 PM.
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  #2345  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 1:49 AM
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GaylordWilshire, your first photo of the Pacific Electric Building reminded me of something I have been meaning to post.

Until a week ago, I had no idea the Jonathan Club was originally located on the top three floors of the Pacific Electric Building.



usc digital archive






Below: Here is a small photograph of the elaborate Jonathan Club ballroom on the top floor of the Pacific Electric Building.


unknown





Below: Today, one can still see the structural steel that was once hidden beneath the elaborate arches.


shainla.typepad.com

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 27, 2010 at 2:04 AM.
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  #2346  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 1:57 AM
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Here is an original Jonathan Club lighting fixture on the top floor of the Pacific Electric Building.



victoriabernal on flickr


I hope you make it to New Orleans GaylordWilshire!

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 27, 2010 at 9:27 PM.
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  #2347  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 2:13 AM
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Beware of the Red Cars

A couple more shots from the PE building:


www.skycityproductions.com

www.skycityproductions.com


Thanks, ethereal-- looks like N.O. will have to wait until the New Year. NYC is a mess right now!
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  #2348  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 2:18 AM
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A view of Silver Lake, looking north on Micheltorena Street from Sunset Blvd.




usc digital archive





Below: Micheltorena Hill in Silver Lake.



silverlake.org
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  #2349  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 3:14 PM
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http://www.silverlake.org/Architectu...no_Estate3.JPG


ethereal-- your shots remind me of the Canfield-Moreno house, at the top of Micheltorena Street in those pictures. It has an interesting history, in addition to being L.A. HCM #391 and where Antonio Moreno and his wife Daisy Canfield moved after selling their Sycamore Avenue house to the Masquers. You can Google it--lots of info--and it's been used in various movies and tv shows. (I went through it once with a NY friend who knew a film person. At any moment I expected to hear a voice call out, "You there! Why are you so late? Why have you kept me waiting so long?" The atmospherics, architecture, and gardens made it seem as though it could easily have been used to film Sunset Boulevard.) I remember the huge basement kitchen as being original, as the rest of the house seemed to be. Anyway, what I didn't know was that, according to http://www.silverlake.org/Architectu...chitecture.htm, Moreno developed the area.


A few more shots:

LAPL http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics39/00039293.jpg
At the top of the hill above is the Canfield-Moreno house below:

LAPL http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics23/00031421.jpg


LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics22/00045872.jpg
Whoever said Chester Place shunned Hollywood? Estelle, Antonio, Ed, and Daisy: the Dohenys
and the Morenos.
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  #2350  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 9:36 PM
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If I remember correctly, the Canfield-Moreno Estate has also been used as a recording studio.

It also goes by the name Paramour Mansion or The Crestmount.






Below: Getting ready to film in one of the rooms in the Canfield-Moreno Estate.



Brad Coy

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bradfordcoy/3422996520/

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 27, 2010 at 9:51 PM.
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  #2351  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 11:28 PM
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The caption for these two photos in the usc archive was....
"A view looking north along Boylston from a bluff just south of Glendale Boulevard, 1937."

I find this area somewhat confusing, so I'm not sure if this is correct.




usc digital archive





usc digital archive






Below: "View of Temple Street looking west at Boylston Street prior to pavement widening and grade correction."



usc digital archive

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 28, 2010 at 12:51 AM.
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  #2352  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2010, 11:51 PM
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View along Boylston Street between Sunset and Glendale Boulevard, 1937.



usc digital archive


This is obviously after some serious street widening.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 28, 2010 at 12:51 AM.
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  #2353  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2010, 12:00 AM
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Pacific Electric Power House at Boylston and 2nd Street, 1905.



usc digital archive
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  #2354  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2010, 12:27 AM
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Since my latest posts have been somewhat Boylston themed:
Here is a 1957 photo of the upper reaches of Boylston Street in Chavez Ravine (the cross street is Effie Street).




usc digital archive


Quite a contrast to the runway-wide Boylston Street in post #2352.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 28, 2010 at 12:38 AM.
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  #2355  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2010, 2:53 AM
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Here's the view of Cafe Colon from the south.


ca.1881 (USC Digital Library)

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1293502808767


ca.1920-1940 (USC Digital Library)

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1293503079497


12/11/10

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsjansen View Post
some more images of 411 n main

1939

Source: LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics09/00014013.jpg

1888

Source: LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics09/00014046.jpg

1874....(ok ok, i know the building hasn't been built yet, but it is the future location of cafe colon )


Source: LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/spnb1/00017165.jpg
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  #2356  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2010, 4:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post


Remnants: A Red Car at the great Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris





All photos from This Was Pacific Electric, written and directed by Thom Eberhardt. Sky City Productions, Inc.:


This interior shot. Wow. In 1961, my mom took me on one of the last Pacific Electric trolley runs down to Long Beach, and even though I was only 6 at the time, I still definitely remember those green seats!

That morning after breakfast, Mom just bundled me in the car and told me we were going Downtown to ride the last of the trolleys. She wanted her son to have that same experience that was so much of a part of her life when she was young. I'm really glad now that she did that! And I still remember a lot of that day...

First we went to Angels Flight. That was the first time I got to ride it, and it was a big thrill. Then we went across to the Grand Central Market. I hated the smells. Then we went back to Hill and Third and we stood there for awhile. (I guess that's where we picked up our ride to the PE station.) I'll never forget the NOISE of that intersection; how LOUD the general hustle-and-bustle of the city was. And I was especially impressed by the electric arcs and the sparks that shot out from the trolleys' contact with the overhead wires. Snap! Crackle! Pop!

The ride to Long Beach was pretty boring, even though it was my first time on a train. (Well, Angels Flight earlier in the day was actually my first train ride, but I digress.) As always, I was fidgety. The car was filled to capacity. I guess nostalgia was thick among the passengers, as there was little talking. Mostly just the sound of the train wheels going clickity-clack, clickity-clack, all along the rail road track.

When we got to Long Beach, Mom took me to this immense old cafeteria downtown. The ceiling was like two stories high. It was crowded and noisy, and kind of dark inside, even though it was mid-day. I don't recall what the name of the big cafeteria was, but I think my mom probably went there a lot when she had relatives living in Long Beach in the '40s.

I don't remember the ride back at all. I probably slept all the way. But overall, it was a very memorable day!

-Scott (really feeling my age right now)

Last edited by Los Angeles Past; Jan 2, 2012 at 2:25 AM.
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  #2357  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2010, 8:55 PM
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"East West Adams"

After exploring the West Adams district for years, west from its generally accepted boundary at Figueroa, I have become intrigued by what was once considered part of the whole. In its earliest days, West Adams extended more or less with the actual boulevard as far east as Main Street which, of course, is the original delineation between the east and west sides of Los Angeles, though this became relatively meaningless in practice as the city spread predominately westward. As I've looked around "East West Adams", I've noticed remnants of neighborhoods--actually, "remnants" is not always the right word at all, since, as one goes east, there are still plenty of large, whole, viable intact neighborhoods of late 19th- and early-20th-century houses, especially beyond Main. A few Victorians remain among more recent, bunkerlike commercial buildings on the north-south (ok, northeast-southwest) streets between Figueroa and Main. Here are few "East West Adams" streetscapes--along with another old-L.A. urban-landscape item, vintage streetlamps. It has been interesting to discover that not all of the old iconic L.A. lamps have disappeared from the main corridors south of the business district.

Main Street-- a type of streetlamp that extends from Main's intersection with 9th and Springs streets down to about Jefferson:



Broadway has a mix of old lamps--what I call "urns" in the vicinity of 28th Street down to Santa Barbara/Martin Luther King, then an early style of gooseneck mixed with newer:



Hill Street remains distinctive for the most part with Hollywood-style spiky lanterns all the way from about 14th Street to 39th:





Grand Avenue uses urn-type double lamps, beginning near downtown with familiar poles that I believe the city refers to as "UM1906" :


These give way to different urns near the old Olympic auditorium:


And then these urns predominate all the way down as far as 39th and the Harbor Freeway:
This "urn" pole at the southeast corner of 33rd is in front of one of a number of Victorian-era houses
somehow still extant among boxy commercial structures in this area (there is a FedEx depot across
Grand from this house, which is pleasant looking compared to the the usual cinderblock-and-razor-
wire variety in this neighborhood).


More old residential LA east of Figueroa:


NE corner of East Adams and Stanford


SE corner of Trinity and 29th


NE corner of Maple and 32nd


NW corner of Broadway and 33rd


Hill near 39th (urns lanterns here rather than the spiky variety, for some reason...)

All photos: Google Street View
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  #2358  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2010, 12:13 AM
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A 6 x 8 glass negative on ebay for the next 5 days.



ebay





Below: Details from the above glass negative.















Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 29, 2010 at 1:20 AM.
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  #2359  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2010, 12:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Los Angeles Past View Post
This interior shot. Wow. In 1961, my mom took me on one of the last Pacific Electric trolley runs down to Long Beach, and even though I was only 6 at the time, I still definitely remember those green seats!

That morning after breakfast, Mom just bundled me in the car and told me we were going Downtown to ride the last of the trolleys. She wanted her son to have that same experience that was so much of a part of her life when she was young. I'm really glad now that she did that! And I still remember a lot of that day...

First we went to Angels Flight. That was the first time I got to ride it, and it was a big thrill. Then we went across to the Grand Central Market. I hated the smells. Then we went back to Hill and Third and we stood there for awhile. (I guess that's where we picked up our ride to the PE station.) I'll never forget the NOISE of that intersection; how LOUD the general hustle-and-bustle of the city was. And I was especially impressed by the electric arcs and the sparks that shot out from the trolleys' contact with the overhead wires. Snap! Crackle! Pop!

The ride to Long Beach was pretty boring, even though it was my first time on a train. (Well, Angels Flight earlier in the day was actually my first train ride, but I digress.) As always, I was fidgety. The car was filled to capacity. I guess nostalgia was thick among the passengers, as there was little talking. Mostly just the sound of the train wheels going clickity-clack, clickity-clack, all along the rail road track.

When we got to Long Beach, Mom took me to this immense old cafeteria downtown. The ceiling was like two stories high. It was crowded and noisy, and kind of dark inside, even though it was mid-day. I don't recall what the name of the big cafeteria was, but I think my mom probably went there a lot when she had relatives living in Long Beach in the '40s.

I don't remember the ride back at all. I probably slept all the way. But overall, it was a very memorable day!

-Scott (really feeling my age right now)

This is such a beautiful memory. Thank you for sharing it Scott.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 31, 2010 at 12:56 AM.
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  #2360  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2010, 12:50 AM
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Another beautiful 6 x 8 glass negative on ebay for the next 5 days.




ebay




Below: Details from the 6 x 8 glass negative.


















Below: Notice the Glengarry and the Maryland Apartments, as well as the State Normal School.


Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 29, 2010 at 1:21 AM.
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