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  #2801  
Old Posted Today, 12:56 PM
cafeguy cafeguy is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Kid View Post
Hmmm thought the city was growing by ~10K for the past few years. Is growth slowing or has this been the average rate we've seen since population started growing?
Philly's diverse corners of the city make a statistic like this harder to use to understand the state of our growth. Its like saying PA's population is hardly growing as a measure of Philly's core.

We are only in the first 10 years of the "turn around" in Philly's population, growth, renaissance, etc etc. NYC might be said to have started its major residential turn around in the early 90s...took another ten years to spread from manhattan out to other parts like brooklyn...then took another ten years to really see significant momentum in many other areas.

We need better statistics from the core of Philly to really determine if we are on the right path. If Philly's renaissance in CC started ten years ago and "greater center city" almost ten years ago... we probably have another ten or twenty years until we REALLY see a change across the entire city.

So that total population number will only grow slightly until the core is REALLY on fire.
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  #2802  
Old Posted Today, 3:11 PM
Philly Kid Philly Kid is offline
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I agree with you. I would like to see more detailed numbers in terms of who is leaving. In a separate census discussion I remember a few posters indicated that the population losses were in many of the blighted and poverty stricken neighborhoods in the city, while the core and surrounding CC neighborhoods continued to see growth.

If this is the case, it' still progress that we are adding net positive residents to the city. As the core and surrounding neighborhoods continue to revitalize, hopefully we will see those formerly blighted neighborhoods continue to increase the number of residents. I'm also hoping that the city can somehow retain more of the millennials who pack up once their first kid comes.

In order to really see accelerated growth, we need these families to stay in the city.
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  #2803  
Old Posted Today, 6:31 PM
cafeguy cafeguy is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Kid View Post
I agree with you. I would like to see more detailed numbers in terms of who is leaving. In a separate census discussion I remember a few posters indicated that the population losses were in many of the blighted and poverty stricken neighborhoods in the city, while the core and surrounding CC neighborhoods continued to see growth.

If this is the case, it' still progress that we are adding net positive residents to the city. As the core and surrounding neighborhoods continue to revitalize, hopefully we will see those formerly blighted neighborhoods continue to increase the number of residents. I'm also hoping that the city can somehow retain more of the millennials who pack up once their first kid comes.

In order to really see accelerated growth, we need these families to stay in the city.
Well... my wife and I are probably the first front of what might be considered the "millenial" generation who are REALLY coming into the city right now, representing a lot of that greater center city population growth. We are in our late twenties and probably will have kids in 2-3 years. We would end up doing paid preschool... but if we wanted to take advantage of non-city school systems that are known to be better, the earliest we would do that is when the kid would be 5 or 6 and entering the public system. So, if my age group is the "front" of the millenial migration and people have kids in their early thirties/late twenties as we are... then the city has 7-9 years to get their school situation in order before the "fear" of the school systems damaging this millenial migration.

Point is... a lot can happen in 7-9 years. If people my age want to make a life in the city... I can't imagine the school systems are STILL going to be SOOO bad in the city in 7-9 years, that I'd think that moving into the suburbs would be well worth the educational system. I mean... MAYBE high school where its not just education, but also safety... but still, that would be 17-19 years from now!!!

I have hope.
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  #2804  
Old Posted Today, 6:41 PM
Larry King Larry King is offline
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I for one will be staying in the city whether the schools are good or not.
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  #2805  
Old Posted Today, 6:48 PM
1487 1487 is offline
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I think people need to remember that a school system that people can believe in will help retain people all over the city of various ages. What is lost in all this talk about the precious folks living from Girard to Washington Ave is that there are people all over the city who move out to find "better" schools. And they dont all move when their kids are in first grade. This has been happening for decades and its not a new crisis- its just being covered by local media as if it's new. Best case scenario is to retain middle and upper class parents no matter where they dwell or how old they are.
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  #2806  
Old Posted Today, 7:20 PM
Baconboy007 Baconboy007 is offline
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Originally Posted by 1487 View Post
I think people need to remember that a school system that people can believe in will help retain people all over the city of various ages. What is lost in all this talk about the precious folks living from Girard to Washington Ave is that there are people all over the city who move out to find "better" schools. And they dont all move when their kids are in first grade. This has been happening for decades and its not a new crisis- its just being covered by local media as if it's new. Best case scenario is to retain middle and upper class parents no matter where they dwell or how old they are.
I think it's all a ploy by the surrounding burbs to get millenials to move back. I had no concerns about moving to a nicer neighborhood when I have kids that are school age until it became a hot topic.
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  #2807  
Old Posted Today, 7:53 PM
1487 1487 is offline
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Originally Posted by Baconboy007 View Post
I think it's all a ploy by the surrounding burbs to get millenials to move back. I had no concerns about moving to a nicer neighborhood when I have kids that are school age until it became a hot topic.
whats interesting about the way its being discussed these days is that it makes it sound like something is wrong with you if you AREN'T threatening to leave if and when you have kids. The reality is that education, like politics, is a very local thing. So saying people will move unless the entire PSD is fixed is a little simplistic and unreasonable. People (especially those in the millenial hotspots) are primarily concerned about free school options in their area. While a total school district transformation sounds great most realize thats a long term project under the rosiest of scenarios- folks are really looking at the elementary schools in their immediate area for hope.
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