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  #14121  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 6:18 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Great photos of Wilshire Blvd., MichaelRyerson! I love how you can see the wicker seating on that Wilshire Blvd. double-decker bus.



A tribute or nod to the Montebello Oil Fields, maybe? They still exist, BTW. Near the shopping mall up in the hills, you can see some of the pumps pumping away.
Really glad someone else noticed those wicker chairs, with the two older gentlemen riding pensively along this one is really a nice shot even with no other real location detail.

I hadn't considered the local oil patch but you're probably right. Oil field workers got to eat. I really like the 'eat' sign over the door and 'Put Eastside inside'.
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  #14122  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 6:18 PM
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This year marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena.

1913

LAPL

The west end of the bridge, circa 1928. Apparently some time during the 1920s, not even being 20 years old, the 5 globe lamps must've been considered outdated? They removed the lower 4 globes and retained the main ones.

LAPL

Someone posted these earlier in this thread... A "suicide barrier" is erected in 1937. Ugly. Basically a chain link fence with barbed wire on top, set up in front of the ornate balustrade.

LAPL

It looks like they even blocked off the seating bays.

LAPL

Here's one of the seating bays before the chain link was put up.

LAPL

This picture is from 1956. Apparently, some time during the late 1940s or early 1950s, the chain link fence AND the balustrade were removed, and a freeway style, tall metal fence was erected. It looks like they even removed the seating in the little bay there. It changes the look of the bridge, and I assume driving on it after this would've just looked like driving on a regular freeway overpass or something.

LAPL

After the Whittier Earthquake of 1987 and the Loma Prieta Earthquake of 1989, the Colorado Street Bridge was closed and totally reconstructed/retrofitted to meet the latest earthquake codes. It reopened in 1993, with its 5-globe lamps, balustrades, and seating bays restored.

I took the following three photos on April 7, 2013.

As you can see, as part of its restoration, they added a guardrail, and the balustrade has fencing along the top of it, as a "suicide barrier."






I took these three pictures in January of 2010. You can hike along the Arroyo Seco near and beneath the bridge.





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  #14123  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 7:05 PM
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Thought I'd chip one in...Happy Birthday. (think the date on this image may be off by a few years.)



Colorado Street Bridge, looking northwest, Pasadena, ca.1915-1920

Photograph of the Colorado Street Bridge, looking northwest, Pasadena, ca.1915-1920. The trusted deck arch bridge appears to be in the late stage of its construction. At the left end of the bridge are construction machinery. An undeveloped part of the mountain (at left) blocks the road and the bridge from connecting. Midway across the bridge hangs two signs which reads: "Mercereau Bridge & Cons Co. Contractors", "Riverside cement used". Street lamps line the bridge. Nearby the bridge are several residential houses. A two-story house is clearly visible in the foreground. Also in the foreground is a road sign that reads "private grounds".

USC digital archive/Title Insurance and Trust / C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960

or two..



Colorado Street Bridge and the Vista del Arroyo Hotel, Herman Schultheis, 1937

This view of the Colorado Street bridge in Pasadena captures terraced ground, cypress and palm trees and the Vista del Arroyo Hotel. The Colorado Street Bridge was designed and built in 1913 by the Kansas City (MO)-based firm of J.A.L. Waddell. With a span of 1,486 feet and known for its distinctive Beaux Arts arches, lights, and railings, the bridge is on the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
Marston and Van Pelt designed the Vista del Arroyo Hotel in 1920 and in 1930 George Wiemeyer added the tower. Myron Hunt designed some of the bungalows. In 1981 the hotel and courtyards were listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2001 the building became a District Court building. The pool and most of the bungalows have been destroyed. The bridge has, of course, long been a tragic favorite of despondent people for many years, hence its dark nickname, 'Suicide Bridge'.

LAPL
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  #14124  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 7:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena.

1913

LAPL

The west end of the bridge, circa 1928. Apparently some time during the 1920s, not even being 20 years old, the 5 globe lamps must've been considered outdated? They removed the lower 4 globes and retained the main ones.

LAPL
An excellent post on the Colorado Street Bridge. The 1928 west end shot shown above intrigued me. When was the arch removed? The hillside had me stumped until I remembered the 134 Freeway wiped out that area.

Last edited by WS1911; Apr 20, 2013 at 8:40 PM.
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  #14125  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 8:32 PM
jg6544 jg6544 is offline
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http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8241/8...6f4c0e80_o.png


Rumor has it, the owner of this building is planning to renovate it and convert it to condos.
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  #14126  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 8:42 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
How Traffic Lights Work
Thx. That little film reminded me of a Monogram film, Foreign Agent (1942) which shows a close-up of the street-signage-topped semaphore signal at Hollywood & Gower just long enough for it to change it from "GO' to "STOP":



The previous shot is of the streetcar on Hollywood Blvd passing Gower:




The following shot is the camera panning down from "The Broadway Hollywood" and "Plaza" signs to a long-since-demolished house:





All above: Monogram Pictures/Netflix

Secret Agent is as dreadful as most Monogram pictures, although I'm devoted to the James Wong, Detective series they did, especially the two with Marjory Reynolds.

Thank you too MR for the Wilshire Blvd. shots. Gorgeous.

The wicker seats took me back. Happy memories.

There's also a shot of Pershing Square in Secret Agent looking SE. I cannot recall knowing about the structure shown:




Monogram Pictures / Netflix

Last edited by tovangar2; Apr 20, 2013 at 8:55 PM. Reason: add images
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  #14127  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 9:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
e_r?
Here's the 'noirish' photograph of the Angelus Temple T2. I'm not sure why it was dropped from my post.


ebay
__


Thx for the information on 1724 N. Highland Mayor Shaw. I would have bet money it was an old fire station.
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  #14128  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 9:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lemster2024 View Post
Greetings to everyone! Am new to this thread, but have spent the past several weeks catching up from the start way back when! I'm so impressed by the knowledge shown by everyone and all of the images posted to date. Like some of you, I grew up in Los Angeles (in the shadow of the Sports Arena) and am familiar with many of the buildings, landmarks, and historical anecdotes that have been mentioned, but not to the extent of everyone else's level of expertise! Hopefully, in the days ahead I might be able to contribute something everyone can enjoy!
Welcome the 'noirish' Los Angeles lemster2024! Feel free to add any photographs you might like to share.
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  #14129  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 9:53 PM
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Here are a few more of the Colorado Street Bridge. Some of these are not captioned. All Images LAPL

No caption

LAPL

Looking west from the Colorado Street Bridge, located over the Arroyo Seco in Pasadena.

LAPL

Construction of the Pasadena Pioneers Bridge, also known as the Colorado Freeway Bridge, is underway directly north of the Colorado Street Bridge, seen on the right. The majestic Vista del Arroyo Hotel is visible in the background on the right. A portion of the photograph caption reads, "The mid-section of the new bridge will be 93 1/2 feet wide. Thirty-two thousand cubic yards of concrete will be poured into the bridge. At right is the old one, where so many people plunged to death." Photograph dated November 15, 1951.

LAPL

Construction of the Pasadena Pioneers Bridge, also known as the Colorado Freeway Bridge, is well underway directly north of the Colorado Street Bridge, seen on the right. The majestic Vista del Arroyo Hotel is visible in the background on the right. Photograph dated August 19, 1953.

LAPL

A couple overlooks the Colorado Street Bridge, located over the Arroyo Seco in Pasadena. Two other local landmarks are visible in the background,the Pasadena City Hall on the left and the Vista del Arroyo Hotel on the right. Photograph caption reads, "Not many months ago this was 'suicide bridge.' Now the famous Pasadena span is the 'bridge of romance' for couples like Anne McGill and James Ford. This paper won a fight to have it screened." Photograph dated March 11, 1939.

LAPL

The Colorado Street Bridge was designed and built in 1913 by the Kansas City (MO)-based firm of J.A.L. Waddell. With a span of 1,486 feet and known for its distinctive Beaux Arts arches, lights, and railings, the bridge is on the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
Photograph caption reads: "While the Colorado Street Bridge today spans a humble waterway, it was a different story in 1913". Photograph dated: Oct. 20, 1983.

LAPL

No caption

LAPL
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  #14130  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 10:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oviatt Building Fan View Post
I'm trying without much success to find out the history of a wonderful 1920s 'French Norman revival' building that was located on the southeast corner of Sunset Blvd. and Crescent Heights Blvd., just east of the Garden of Allah apartments. The structure faced Sunset Blvd.

Circa 1930:


Huntington Library Collection
Oviatt, this is by far the best photograph of this exceptional building. I'm sorry to say, I wasn't able to dig up any additional information for you.

That said, I am also curious about the drug store that appears along the left hand side of your photograph (across Sunset Blvd.) It looks like it
might have been an interesting building as well.
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  #14131  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena.

As you can see, as part of its restoration, they added a guardrail, and the balustrade has fencing along the top of it, as a "suicide barrier."
So beautiful! They did a tremendous job with the restoration. Thx for sharing your photos sopas_ej.
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  #14132  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 10:17 PM
westcork westcork is offline
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Here is another cluster, just because

Side view of the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena.

LAPL

Photo of the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena. View 1: shows the length of the bridge as it curves across the ravine.

LAPL

Postcard of an earlier view of the Colorado Street Bridge, in Pasadena. View shows people walking and standing along the sides. Note the lamps on the bridge.

LAPL

Scenic view of the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena

LAPL

Photo of cars travelling the Colorado Street Bridge as construction work continues on the 134 Freeway, in Pasadena.

LAPL

Repair work being done on the Colorado Street Bridge. Photograph dated December 1991.

LAPL

Aerial view of traffic congestion on the Colorado Street Bridge. Cars are backed up across the bridge, and further.

LAPL

Construction work on the Colorado Street Bridge, in Pasadena. The Vista Del Arroyo Hotel is on the right.

LAPL
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  #14133  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 11:03 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 27, 2015 at 4:26 PM. Reason: delete
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  #14134  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 11:13 PM
Oviatt Building Fan Oviatt Building Fan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

... I am also curious about the drug store that appears along the left hand side of your photograph (across Sunset Blvd.) It looks like it
might have been an interesting building as well.

Thankfully, that particular building still exists. Its most famous tenants these days are "Greenblatt's Deli & Wine Shop" and "The Laugh Factory".


Here's a link to a recent photo. It shows the building's northeast corner:

http://www.slashgamer.com/wp-content...gh-Factory.jpg


And here's a link to an older image. Same corner:

http://www.joelloveskimberley.com/we...latts-deli.jpg
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  #14135  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 11:35 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Thanks Oviatt.
__


I found some interesting information on the Pacifc Mutual Building on their marketing website the other day. (I never knew about the Carriage House)


http://pacmutualdtla.com/




http://pacmutualdtla.com/
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http://www.lapl.org/






ebay




The art deco make-over of the Clock Building is visible this 1963 photograph. (the University of Wisconsin played in the Rose bowl that year)


http://uwdc.library.wisc.edu/



...more information from http://www.viewfromaloft.org/2012/04...tual-sold.html



http://www.viewfromaloft.org/2012/04...tual-sold.html

So I wonder if they're going to restore the Clock Building back to it's Beaux Art origins? I think they should if it's possible.
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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 20, 2013 at 11:53 PM.
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  #14136  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2013, 11:44 PM
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I recognize the building now Oviatt. Glad you included the link.


http://www.joelloveskimberley.com/we...latts-deli.jpg

This must be from Ed Ruscha's photography book of EVERY Building on Sunset Boulevard. Has anyone seen that book in person?
I think they're quite rare (and expensive). Just in case you were thinking of getting me something for my birthday.


Too bad about the scratches though. I'm kidding.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 21, 2013 at 12:04 AM.
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  #14137  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2013, 12:18 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Thanks Oviatt.

I found some interesting information on the Pacifc Mutual Building on their marketing website the other day. (I never knew about the Carriage House)

__
That's just the Pacific Mutual Parking Garage. I never heard of it being called "The Carriage House" before either. It contains LA's first underground parking.

It and the "VIP ramp" between it and the Biltmore are often used in films. A key scene in "Criss Cross" is filmed both inside on "The Carriage House"'s and on the exit ramp to Grand (MR identified the interior as a set. Thx!).

The plinth-mounted lanterns at either end are particularly nice.

There's a post here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=11158

Here's one more screen grab, this time from "Dave" (1993) LA plays DC



http://movie-tourist.blogspot.com/20...dave-1993.html

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 27, 2015 at 4:32 PM. Reason: correction courtesy of MR
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  #14138  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2013, 12:57 AM
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I remember that location now T2. I guess 'Carriage House' threw me off.
I should have figured it out.
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  #14139  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2013, 1:01 AM
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WS1911 WS1911 is offline
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Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
That's just the Pacific Mutual Parking Garage. I never heard of it being called "The Carriage House" before either. It contains LA's first underground parking.

It and the "VIP ramp" between it and the Biltmore are often used in films. A key scene in "Criss Cross" is filmed both inside "The Carriage House" and on the exit ramp to Grand.

I walked by the Pacific Mutual Parking Garage today. It's the most architecturally attractive garage I've ever seen. The facade on the Grand Ave. side is different from the Olive St. side. Is this one garage or two separate ones?

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  #14140  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2013, 1:45 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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I found this 1925 photograph among ebay images I had saved to a cd.



The alley intrigued me right away so I checked Google Earth and there it was.



google earth




Next I checked my 1947 street map and discovered this 'alley' had a name, Lebanon St!



I was pretty psyched thinking I had 'rediscovered' this obscure little alley-like Lebanon Street. That is, until I finally typed in
'Lebonon Street' and found it still listed in the digital age.


google

It's amazing how these 'ghosts' from the past can turn up on our computers screens.
That's what makes this so much fun, you never know what you're going to discover....or rediscover.
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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Apr 21, 2013 at 2:03 AM.
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