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Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 7:19 AM
scrapersky458 scrapersky458 is offline
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how does exterior masonry not crack when the building sways

sorry if not the best forum for this. I think I asked it here and it disapeared.

Anyway, for example the empire state building, which I guess is getting old. with all the ice that expands in the concrete and weathering, and the swaying, how don't parts crumble off? I guess glass or metal curtain walls are somewhat flexible materials and also have rubber gaskets between sections which allow movement, but masonry seems like it would crumble over time.
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Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 9:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scrapersky458 View Post
sorry if not the best forum for this. I think I asked it here and it disapeared.

Anyway, for example the empire state building, which I guess is getting old. with all the ice that expands in the concrete and weathering, and the swaying, how don't parts crumble off? I guess glass or metal curtain walls are somewhat flexible materials and also have rubber gaskets between sections which allow movement, but masonry seems like it would crumble over time.
It's limestone. It's not a solid block attached to the building, but attached to the steel frame. It can flex so it won't break.
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Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 6:53 PM
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Masonry curtain walls are also built in sections to allow for thermal expansion and contraction. The sections are separated by a steel relieving angle, which also supports the individual sections. The term "relieving" refers to the steel angle providing enough space for a horizontal expansion joint, and not to relieving the lower masonry from the weight of the higher masonry above.

Overall, the individual masonry sections aren't too different from modern glass curtain wall sections, and they will flex with the building.

Bearing wall supported buildings or cage-style (bearing wall supported exterior, steel or cast-iron supported interior) buildings are typically shorter and less flexible than internal support buildings. As a result, they will encounter less flex and be less affected by wind forces.

All masonry facades (as well as any facade, really) will need to be evaluated for damage over their operating lifespans.
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Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:14 AM
scrapersky458 scrapersky458 is offline
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thanks
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