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  #921  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2015, 10:38 PM
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Something big is being planned over at 80 South St ...

Plans for a Seaport Megatower?

Quote:
In a letter to shareholders on March 13, 2105, the Howard Hughes Corporation publicly disclosed the acquisition of property and air rights from 161-163 Front St., 167 Front St., 175 Front St., 164 John St., 205-207 Front St., 2 Fulton St., 89 and 94 South St. In the last quarter of 2014 they acquired properties at 80 and 83-85 South St.

The Howard Hughes Corporation has been busily assembling properties on the immediate outskirts of the South Street Seaport Historic District, that may allow them to build the largest residential mixed-use building in North America as-of-right,” said a Save Our Seaport spokesperson. […]

The HHC’s proposed “Seaport District Assemblage” may even be taller than 1 World Trade Center (without the antenna) utilizing 818,000 square feet on South Street between John and Fletcher Streets.”
Man, if we get another SHoP designed 1,300 footer here that would be epic.
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  #922  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2015, 11:36 PM
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A new rendering for 470 11th Ave which is ~ 720 feet or so.


Credit: http://www.archilier.com.cn/zh/portf...90%88%E4%BD%93

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Originally Posted by hunser View Post

Man, if we get another SHoP designed 1,300 footer here that would be epic.
This is like their 5th one that they might design or are in the process? Damn, SHoP is on a roll. The supertall gods giving us their nectar and fruits.
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  #923  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 2:12 AM
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Just who is this brute crashing our supertall party? And who is his friend?


http://www.ajsny.com/










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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #924  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 2:32 AM
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This looks similar to Libeskind's design for WTC1.
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  #925  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 3:30 AM
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Now about this second tower (we get a peak behind "Portfolio"), I haven't heard much about it.


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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #926  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 3:44 AM
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I like it because it looks like they intentionally made it look somewhat similar to the wtc towers. For example, the glass is the same color. Anyways, I wish it had a more substantial spire but I would be very happy to get this building as it is.
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  #927  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 3:45 AM
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looks like a 'what could have been' at 75 Nassau Street, which was recently cut from 800'+ to under 500'. (using 70 Pine as a height reference) Though it might be a bit south of where it should be.
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click here too see hunser's list of the many supertall skyscrapers of New York City!
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  #928  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 12:11 PM
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Some general, misguided thoughts on superall rising...


http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer...rapers-be.html


By Justin Davidson
March 23, 2015


Quote:
...That’s as high as Manhattan will climb for the foreseeable future. In the next half-dozen years, the Nordstrom Tower on 57th Street, by Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill, and Kohn Pedersen Fox’s One Vanderbilt, a likely neighbor to Grand Central Terminal, will both top out around 1,500 feet. Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park, which now looks like a skewer in a pincushion, reaches just shy of 1,400. Seen from New York, the notion of a mile-high tower can seem like a distant, screwball real-estate venture, like an indoor ski slope in the desert or a fake Manhattan in China. “If we can build plenty of 50- and 60-story buildings, do we need any 120-story buildings?” asks the architect Jamie von Klemperer, who has an interest in the answer, since his firm, KPF, is designing the 65-story One Vanderbilt.

But just because there are no current plans to push a building’s height from profitable to narcissistic doesn’t mean it won’t happen. Manhattan is where global egos — and foreign money — come to roost, and there’s no telling what monuments they will choose to erect. Even a single Manhattan block could accommodate a 2,500-foot tower. A superblock — say, the one where Madison Square Garden now sits — could support something much bigger than that.

Although the next generation of superskyscrapers is likely to be built in other parts of the planet, they will still affect New York just by existing. The world’s tallest towers are outliers by definition, but a few 1,000-foot towers have already made their 800-foot sidekicks commonplace. Two or three contestants for the mile-high mark will sow an underbrush of half-milers.

New York may never again have the world’s highest anything, but those thin-air buildings halfway around the world will surely pull the local skyline upward. The real question is how those taller structures will shape the city below. “The big advances have less to do with ultimate height than with the way skyscrapers meet the ground, the way they’re intertwined with public space or the way public functions get integrated,” von Klemperer says.

That applies to One Vanderbilt, an office building that thousands of people will enter or cross through every day. Its base is stitched to transit, and its design needs government support. It is, in that sense, partly a public building. But a new economic lunacy is reshaping the skyline: the fact that a very few will pay vast sums for a tiny number of apartments that they rarely occupy. Their developers are selling a bizarre mixture of privacy and ostentation, and they require no approvals, which means they have no reason to care what the public thinks. That raises major moral questions.

Supertall, superskinny towers benefit hardly anyone, but their impact is citywide. The first time the confluence of technology and economics started reshaping the skyline, the city responded with the 1916 zoning code, which required tall buildings to recede as they climbed so that light and air would penetrate to the city’s lower zones. Those rules didn’t cap height or sap New York’s real-estate energy; rather, they gave us the classic setback tower — the Empire State Building, for example.

Now that we see how tall tomorrow’s tallest buildings will be, and how common the runners-up, we must adapt again. We could protect certain view corridors, as London does, or limit the shadows a tower casts, or impose an automatic public review on any building over 1,000 feet. What we need is a new ethics of the skyline — a way to wrestle with the question posed by SOM’s Ken Lewis: “Whom does the sky belong to? Given the density we live in, and given that the sky provides daylight to all of us, does someone else have the right to take it?”
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #929  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 9:48 PM
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Hey hunser we have another one today!

130 William Street will be 581 feet and 50 floors. Mostly condos, some hotel, and regular apartments. So... thats two 650 footers plus, a 470 footer, and a 581 footer in the last two weeks. Plus, the announcement of a possible supertall near WTC, and 80 South street.
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  #930  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2015, 10:22 PM
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^ Yeah, New York is on a roll.

I'm really excited about 80 South St, I have a feeling we could see something very beautiful and tall rise here. And SHoP has proven itself to deliver.
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  #931  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2015, 1:13 AM
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111W aka Steinway got another height bump, now 1,428ft / 435m.

http://www.111w57.com/






Last edited by hunser; Mar 29, 2015 at 1:24 AM.
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  #932  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2015, 11:12 PM
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We've discussed the possibility of a megatall in New York several times in this thread ... the Chicago Skyneedle (2000ft/610m, 125 floors) would work perfectly imho (thanks@ Guiltyspark for the idea):








It's skinny and has a nice spire. The tower could be mix-used (residenital/hotel).
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  #933  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2015, 11:30 PM
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They should build the Chicago Spire here. Manhattan can support the units for it, and it would make a profit.

But in terms of the Chicago Skyneedle, something like this resembles a 1920/30's look. What Lower Manhattan needs. Just a modern version it it.

A good location for it would be right near City Hall on the corner of Park Row and Beekman (Right near J&R). It would be an a position that would make the skyline look sweet without overpowering the WTC Complex. Its a fantasy, but one that would epic.
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  #934  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2015, 12:53 AM
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Just make sure it's really over 2,000 feet. So we can piss off the N.I.M.B.Y.'s. .

Last edited by Roadcruiser1; Mar 30, 2015 at 1:10 AM.
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  #935  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2015, 12:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
They should build the Chicago Spire here. Manhattan can support the units for it, and it would make a profit.

But in terms of the Chicago Skyneedle, something like this resembles a 1920/30's look. What Lower Manhattan needs. Just a modern version it it.

A good location for it would be right near City Hall on the corner of Park Row and Beekman (Right near J&R). It would be an a position that would make the skyline look sweet without overpowering the WTC Complex. Its a fantasy, but one that would epic.
I'm not sure about the Chicago Spire ... it's a bit too "miamish" for my taste and wouldn't fit New York.
The skyneedle on the other hand is just perfect. The proportions are perfectly suited for a tall residential tower (slim, setbacks). And the spire works pretty well too.
And yes, Lower Manhattan should have the first 2000 footer although my guess would be Midtown East taking the cake.

EDIT: 420 Albee Square got a massive height cut ...

http://www.yimbynews.com/2015/03/420...ries-tall.html

Quote:
But now, the SLCE-designed building seems to have been shortened dramatically. The tower’s floor count has been reduced from 65 stories down to 35, and its height has seen a drop from 679 feet to 389 feet.
Too bad, since this area needs some height.

Last edited by hunser; Mar 30, 2015 at 12:56 PM.
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  #936  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2015, 1:57 PM
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Good news gentlemen!! Just when 420 Albee Square got a massive height cut ... we get this:

New Queens Plaza Skyscraper Gets Help From Historic Clock Tower Next Door

Quote:
[...]Now it will be truly overshadowed. A 915-foot skyscraper — the city’s tallest outside Manhattan — is about to sprout on its doorstep. Yet the connection is no coincidence: The clock tower is helping make this 77-story glassy giant possible.

A rendering of the proposed apartment building behind the Long Island City clock tower. SLCE Architects, via The Metropolitan Transportation Authority

So another 900 footer for the city!
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  #937  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2015, 12:29 PM
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eVolo Magazine is pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 Skyscraper Competition.

Quote:
The award was established in 2006 to recognize outstanding ideas for vertical living. Since then, the publication has received more than 6,000 projects that envision the future of building high. These ideas, through the novel use of technology, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations, challenge the way we understand vertical architecture and its relationship with the natural and built environments.

In 2015, the Jury, formed by leaders of the architecture and design fields selected 3 winners and 15 honorable mentions. eVolo Magazine received 480 projects from all continents. The winners were selected for their creativity, ingenuity, and understanding of dynamic and adaptive vertical communities.

The first place was awarded to BOMP (Ewa Odyjas, Agnieszka Morga, Konrad Basan, and Jakub Pudo) from Poland for their project Essence Skyscraper. The proposal is an urban mega-structure that contains diverse natural habitats. The skyscraper would serve as a place to briefly escape urban life and stimulate diverse and complex experiences.
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  #938  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2015, 12:40 PM
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http://www.architecturaldigest.com/a...models-article



I think it's pretty clear why we need a much taller tower @HY. The North Tower is simply not tall enough to break the plateau. What a pity it got a height cut (from originally 1,337ft/408m).

I really hope the Hudson Spire reaches at least 1,500' ... although chances are slim. Maybe with a large crown/spire ...
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  #939  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2015, 10:04 PM
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I have a feeling that the second phase will be residential supertalls. Thats IF the market holds and continues its superb strength. With the biggest lot essentially on the island, they better take advantage of the site. Build tall or go home.

Personally, I would like to see some mixed-use towers for the second phase. Some hotel, residential with tons of affordable housing ,and at the top, luxury to ultra luxury, With the varying ceiling heights, and space allocation, it could be a recipe for a couple of supertalls. At least minimum 800 feet if they go lower, but something to be somewhat noticeable and worthy of the site.

It would be cool to live in the complex, shop, and work next door. The residents will have a win-win if they work and live in the HY. Can't complain with that combo.
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  #940  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2015, 9:28 PM
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250 South Street got a massive height cut, down from 847' to 700' now.

Quote:
Building Height (ft.): 700
Building Stories: 56
Dwelling Units: 646
Luckily there are no tall towers in the area, so even at 700 feet it will be very visible on the skyline.
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