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  #6861  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 4:46 AM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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Originally Posted by LakeLocker View Post
I donno I've had two of my parent's young cousins die in the last 2 weeks(non covid), its bad enough not being able to have a funeral, but this type of thing is just insulting.

Did people really need to see bodies?
It's reality.

Every coffin that came home from Iraq should be on US prime time TV.
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  #6862  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 4:46 AM
LakeLocker LakeLocker is offline
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Originally Posted by Corndogger View Post
It's good that this is being documented so people in the future don't try to claim it was all some huge hoax. Near the very end of WWII when the allies were taking over Germany and liberating the concentration camps the Americans took people who lived in the nearby towns to see what was going on with their own eyes and how badly the people imprisoned were being treated. Many of the German citizens were shocked at how malnourished the "prisoners" were because they had been sending them food packages. In one case the mayor of the town of Ohrdruf and his wife were taken to see local labor camp. After the visit they went home and killed themselves.
Then find people who are willing to consent to such photos

I've never seen any photos of the deaths caused by communist gulags, or the communist/cultural revolution in china. But I don't need to see their faces to understand it is fundamentally wrong.

Who knows if we weren't so reliant on imagery maybe westerners might actually believe that the cultural revolution, soviet gulags were actually a thing?
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  #6863  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 4:47 AM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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Originally Posted by LakeLocker View Post
It is the dehumanization of people that I find bothersome. Because they don't have living family members somehow they are less human?

If we're talking about the holocaust I think it is rather obvious that it is because these people were already dehumanized that we think its ok.
It's not like their names are plastered across the coffins.
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  #6864  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 4:48 AM
LakeLocker LakeLocker is offline
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Originally Posted by WarrenC12 View Post
Doesn't stop you from spouting off complex medical topics like they're fact.

Please stop.
Pardon?

I posted a link and said from the begging that this is a "if" statement.

I've never claimed to know anything about biology, it is far from an interest of mine.
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  #6865  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 4:49 AM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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Originally Posted by LakeLocker View Post
Pardon?

I posted a link and said from the begging that this is a "if" statement.

I've never claimed to know anything about biology, it is far from an interest of mine.
Your posts are a mix of fear mongering and moronic bullshit. Then you get all indignant when people call you out.
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  #6866  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 4:54 AM
LakeLocker LakeLocker is offline
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Originally Posted by WarrenC12 View Post
Your posts are a mix of fear mongering and moronic bullshit. Then you get all indignant when people call you out.
You're moving the goal posts.

I'm talking about specifically to biology.

You want to argue about other things go ahead.



Just because I have a moral standard on a particular issue doesn't mean it has to be connected to my other posts.
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  #6867  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 6:26 AM
flipper316 flipper316 is offline
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Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
Watching the BC CTV outlet and you start to pickup on how the media is thriving on driving Covid hysteria. They are working themselves into a tizzy as to why the Chief Provincial Health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry won't release modelling figures. Dr. Henry has emerged as one of the best CPHO during this crisis but CTV wants the worst-case scenario alarmist figures to drive ratings and fear, so they're hounding her over it.

There are way to many variable to fully explain modelling to the public. I'm surprised the Feds did it at all. How is "anywhere from 10,000 to 350,000" remotely valuable? They breathlessly reported up to 350k deaths in Canada, equivalent to Canada's yearly death total. Oh, so how many of that 350k would have died anyway this year?
Hear, hear. All this fear and paranoia for nothing except ratings.
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  #6868  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 6:48 AM
lio45 lio45 is offline
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
We have more snow in Timmins. We can't walk in our parks or yards yet. Last year we still had snow on the ground well into the second half of May. Usually it is gone by the end of April.
Yeah but snow in Timmins is something you guys are used to; it doesn't cause a state of emergency.
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  #6869  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 6:51 AM
lio45 lio45 is offline
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Originally Posted by Corndogger View Post
What makes you think no one here cares about what happens in SK?
True, it's interesting to follow updates (including pics) from that Canadian SSPer who lives in Seoul. They've handled it well and might be a model to follow for other countries.

However if you're talking about "Flyover SK" I will second what everyone else said, no one cares.
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  #6870  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 9:52 AM
saffronleaf saffronleaf is offline
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Why don't they just cremate them?
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  #6871  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 10:52 AM
ReeceZ ReeceZ is offline
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Have Australia and New Zealand stopped Covid-19 in its tracks?

Australia and neighbouring New Zealand, almost unique among anglophone countries, have so far been successful in largely suppressing the spread of Covid-19 within their countries, and in particular, keeping deaths low.

Australia, with a population of 25 million, has had just over 6,000 infections, and 50 deaths. New Zealand, a country of 5 million people, which closed its borders the day before Australia, has had 1,200 infections and so far only one death from Covid-19.

“We have so far avoided the horror scenarios that we have seen overseas, whether it be initially in China in Wuhan, or in New York in the United States, or Italy, or Spain, or even the United Kingdom,” Morrison said this week. “But we must hold the course. We must lock in these gains.”

Read more:https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ks-coronavirus


It's too bad Canada couldn't have followed Oceania in it's approach to dealing with the virus. Instead, we have a "wait and see" type of PM who is afraid of actually providing strong and effective leadership during a real crisis.
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  #6872  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 11:45 AM
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This was a pretty sobering read from a nurse working in NYC. Keep your parents safe.



I lost a patient today. He was not the first, and unfortunately he's definitely not the last. But he was different. I've been an ER nurse my entire career, but in New York I find myself in the ICU. At this point there's not really anywhere in the hospital that isn't ICU, all covid 19 positive. They are desperate for nurses who can titrate critical medication drips and troubleshoot ventiltors.

I've taken care of this man the last three nights, a first for me. In the ER I rarely keep patients for even one 12 hour shift. His entire two week stay had been rough for him, but last night was the worst. I spent the first six hours of my shift not really leaving his room. By the end, with so many medications infusing at their maximum, I was begging the doctor to call his family and let them know. "He's not going to make it", I said. The poor doctors are so busy running from code to code, being pulled by emergent patients every minute. All I could think of was the voice of my mom in my head, crying as I got on the plane to leave for this place: "Those people are alone, you take good care of them". I was the only person in that room for three nights in a row, fighting as hard as I could to keep this man alive. The doctor was able to reach the family, update them. It was decided that when his heart inevitably stopped we wouldn't try to restart it. There just wasn't anything else left to do.

Eventually, he gave up. It was just him and me and his intubated roommate in the next bed. The wooden door to the room is shut, containing infection and cutting us off from the rest of the world. I called the doctor to come and mark the time of death. I wished so much that I could let his family know that while they might not have been with him, I was.

I shut the pumps down (so horribly many of them), disconnected the vent, took him off the monitor. We didn't extubate him, too much of a risk to staff. Respiratory took the vent as soon as I called. It's just a portable one, but it's life to someone downstairs. The CNA helped me to wash him and place him in a body bag, a luxury afforded only to those who make it out of the ER. Down there the bodies pile up on stretchers, alone, while the patients on vents wait for the golden spot my gentleman just vacated. We'll talk about the ER another time. My patient was obviously healthy in his life. I look at his picture in his chart, the kind they take from a camera over a computer when you aren't really prepared. A head shot, slightly awkward. I see someone's Grandpa, someone's Dad, someones Husband. They aren't here with him. My heart breaks for them.

I fold his cute old man sweater and place it in a bag with his loafers, his belongings. I ask where to put this things. A coworker opens the door to a locked room; labeled bags are piled to the ceiling. My heart drops. It's all belongings of deceased parents, waiting for a family member to someday claim them. A few nights ago they had 17 deaths in a shift. The entire unit is only 17 beds.

These patients are so fragile. It's such a delicate balance of breathing, of blood pressure, of organ function. The slightest movement or change sends them into hours long death spirals. The codes are so frequent those not directly involved barely even register them. The patients are all the same, every one. Regardless of age, health status, wealth, family, or power the diagnosis is the same, the disease process is the same, and the aloneness is the same. Our floor has one guy that made it to extubation. He's 30 years old. I view him as our mascot, our ray of hope that not everyone here is just waiting to die. I know that most people survive just fine, but that's not what it feels like in this place. Most of the hospital staff is out sick. We, the disaster staff, keep our n95 masks glued to our faces. We all think we are invincible, but I find myself eyeing up my coworkers, wondering who the weak ones are, knowing deep down that not all of us will make it out of here alive.

A bus takes us back to the hotel the disaster staff resides in, through deserted Manhatten. We are a few blocks from Central Park. We pass radio city music hall, nbc studios, times square. There is no traffic. The sidewalks are empty. My room is on the 12th floor. At 7pm you can hear people cheering and banging on and pans for the healthcare workers at change of shift. This city is breaking and stealing my heart simultaneously. I didn't know what I was getting into coming here, but it's turning out to be quite a lot.

Jennifer Cole

https://www.facebook.com/679156202/p...418726203/?d=n
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  #6873  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 1:04 PM
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Excellent post.

There are certain patients that get to you. The one that always haunts me is a patient that I spent all night with as an intern in Halifax. He had an autoimmune disease called Wegener's granulomatosis, which is systemic, but primarily involved the sinuses and respiratory tract. I remembered admitting him several days previously, and since he was admitted on my service, I had been involved in daily rounds with him, and occasionally with housekeeping duties regarding his care during his admission. He was a nice guy in his mid 40s with a wife and family. The night he died, I was on call, so I had the privilege of watching him and trying to manage his acute deterioration, all the while in communication with the attending physician from home. I was with him when he died.

His body was at war with itself, with his immune system completely out of control, even despite maximal therapy with corticosteroids and other immunosuppressives. There was nothing more that could be done. The remainder of his care was supportive, and he was on oxygen. We did not move him into intensive care, and although the memory is a little fuzzy, I think that was because the ICU was full. The rapidity of his decline was breathtaking, and he finally coded at about 4 AM. Efforts at resuscitation (not surprisingly) were ineffective.

Since I had followed this patient since admission, had grown to know him, and his proximate cause of death was uncertain, I took the opportunity later that day to attend the autopsy to discover what had happened. The autopsy I found quite jarring, because this was more than just another corpse. This was a man that I had grown to know, and to see the pathologist working away with his bone saw removing the top of the calvarium to examine the brain, making the midline abdominal incision to examine his viscera etc, just seemed cruel. Of course it wasn't. The pathologist was just doing his job.

At it's core, Wegener's is simply a systemic autoimmune vasculitis, and the proximate cause of death was splenic venous thrombosis, leading to splenic congestion, subsequent infarction and rupture. He essentially exsanguinated into his peritoneal cavity.

There was nothing about his care that was substandard (for the mid 1980s). Today he might have survived due to emergent CT imaging and immediate surgical intervention (splenectomy). Medical management of autoimmune disease is also profoundly better these days.

There was no fault, but the death of this man haunts me to this day.........
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Last edited by MonctonRad; Apr 10, 2020 at 4:59 PM.
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  #6874  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 1:13 PM
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de Adder strikes again........



Micheal de Adder is a good Moncton (Riverview) boy, but now resides in Halifax. He is unquestionably one of the best political cartoonists in North America right now. This year he won the Herblock Prize for editorial cartooning, which is just one step below the Pulitzer Prize in terms of prestige.
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  #6875  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 1:21 PM
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Originally Posted by ReeceZ View Post
It's too bad Canada couldn't have followed Oceania in it's approach to dealing with the virus. Instead, we have a "wait and see" type of PM who is afraid of actually providing strong and effective leadership during a real crisis.
It's no secret to any of those who pay attention to my posts on SSP that I am no fan of Justin Trudeau, but his handling of the COVID-19 crisis has been consistent and fairly competent. It would have been impossible for Canada to follow the example of Australia and NZ just because of our physical proximity to the US, and the intertwined nature of our economies.

We could have handled the repatriation of Canadian citizens from abroad much better. Screening of the returnees could have been more vigorous, and enforcement of the two week self isolation periods for the returnees stronger, but as you can see by the shitshow to our south, Canada is comparably (and demonstrably) much better off than our American cousins............
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  #6876  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 1:21 PM
goodgrowth goodgrowth is offline
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Originally Posted by ReeceZ View Post
Australia and neighbouring New Zealand, almost unique among anglophone countries, have so far been successful in largely suppressing the spread of Covid-19 within their countries, and in particular, keeping deaths low.

Australia, with a population of 25 million, has had just over 6,000 infections, and 50 deaths. New Zealand, a country of 5 million people, which closed its borders the day before Australia, has had 1,200 infections and so far only one death from Covid-19.

“We have so far avoided the horror scenarios that we have seen overseas, whether it be initially in China in Wuhan, or in New York in the United States, or Italy, or Spain, or even the United Kingdom,” Morrison said this week. “But we must hold the course. We must lock in these gains.”

Read more:https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ks-coronavirus


It's too bad Canada couldn't have followed Oceania in it's approach to dealing with the virus. Instead, we have a "wait and see" type of PM who is afraid of actually providing strong and effective leadership during a real crisis.

I wonder if this just proves that warmer weather does have some limiting effect on the spread.
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  #6877  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 2:14 PM
Mikemike Mikemike is offline
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Or maybe they didn’t have huge numbers of citizens repatriating from a country where it was running rampant.
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  #6878  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 2:41 PM
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Being island nations must be an advantage.

I also think this spreads slower in summer weather.
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  #6879  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 2:50 PM
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Being an island nation and with very warm weather has worked in their favor. Western Canada being mostly remote from large U.S. population centres and Eastern Canadian large metros has helped the West avoid the worst of covid compared to Southern Ontario and Quebec.
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  #6880  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2020, 3:04 PM
Denscity Denscity is offline
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Well BC is next door to Washington State - North America's first hotspot, YVR has the most flights from China in North America, and the Vancouver area is home to a large (returning) Iranian population. But despite all this BC has only a fraction of the infected that Eastern Canada has.
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