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  #141  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 9:23 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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We're talking about two different things. And I never said LA would surpass NYC in population.
     
     
  #142  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 10:48 PM
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Lol. It must have been an off day when I rode it. Wasn't too sketchy..
I think the LA metro is still pretty clean and decent. Are there bums? Yes, but its not too bad although i dont ride very early in the morning when i heard its at its worst
     
     
  #143  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 11:25 PM
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I ride Metro (two rail lines, one bus) to work every day since starting a new job about a month ago. Surprisingly few bums, and only once did the train have the stench of urine. I did see one guy trying to defecate against the wall on the mezzanine level at US and another with his pants hanging below his (exposed) buttocks as he struggled to make his way down the stairs to the platform. The only other “characters” (clearly on drugs) were mostly people spewing profanity and other vulgar drivel (nobody pays attention).
     
     
  #144  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:09 AM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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Yea, I don't see what this is hard to understand. Texans (as usual) want to believe their situation is different, because, well, it's Texas. There are cheaper cities outside of Texas that will draw the same people getting priced out. There's evidence for this, and not some wishful thinking bs. "Oh...but we have space" crap that means nothing.

What's stopping OKC from absorbing Texans outflow? Or Tulsa? Or KC?
Texas has all kinds of cities that are far from mature and also close to the current stars (Corpus, The Valley Cities, Killeen-Temple, etc...). Texas is not slowing down. The big metros also have room to grow up and out.
     
     
  #145  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 4:45 AM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Wishul thinking it will never slow down.
But keep thinking that...I guess?

None of us knows anyway, so it's kinda pointless.
     
     
  #146  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 5:20 AM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Texas is not slowing down.
Obviously not. Anyone with half a brain (or access to data) knows this.

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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
The big metros also have room to grow up and out.
Plenty. Like tons.

I'll just leave this right here (and yes, I know it's 6 years old but that's besides the point as the trends have continued to this day, and yes, I know it focuses on COL as opposed to recreational options - it's TIME magazine, not CNTraveller):

http://ideas.time.com/2013/10/17/10-...is-our-future/

Tyler Cowen’s 10 Reasons Texas Is Our Future

It's big. It's hot. It's cheap. And, according to Tyler Cowen, it's where America's 'new cowboys' are blazing a path for the nation to follow

By Ryan Sager
Oct. 17, 2013

The crisis may be over (for the time being) in Washington. But the crisis for America’s middle class continues, as middle-income jobs get harder to find and the cost of living gets harder to bear. Where can Americans turn for answers? In a word: Texas.
In the cover story of this week’s TIME magazine, libertarian economist Tyler Cowen, author of the new book Average Is Over, looks at why so many Americans are headed to the Lone Star State. And he comes to a surprising conclusion. For better or worse, he argues, it’s because Texas is our future.
Based on Cowen’s research, here are 10 reasons why America’s future is going to look a lot more like Texas:

1. Everyone’s moving there

More Americans are moving to Texas than to any other state. As Cowen notes in the piece:
Texas is America’s fastest-growing large state, with three of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country: Austin, Dallas and Houston. In 2012 alone, total migration to Texas from the other 49 states in the Union was 106,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Since 2000, 1 million more people have moved to Texas from other states than have left … Over the past 20 years, more than 4 million Californians have moved to Texas.

2. The middle-class squeeze

We’re creating jobs at the low end of the income spectrum — 58% of jobs created since the end of the Great Recession pay less than $13.83 an hour. However, it’s not that incomes are stagnant generally. Earners at the top have done very well — but the gains have been distributed quite unevenly. Last year the top 1% of earners took home 19.3% of household income, their largest share since 1928. The top 10% of earners didn’t do so badly either, taking home a rec­ord 48.2% of household income.
The middle-income job is disappearing, at the same time that holding onto a middle-class lifestyle is becoming more expensive. As a 2010 report by the Department of Commerce found, looking at economic data from the past two decades, “The prices for three large components of middle-class expenses have increased faster than income: the cost of college, the cost of health care and the cost of a house.”

3. Automation

One of the big reasons behind the middle-class squeeze is automation — and it’s only going to get worse, possibly much worse. A recent study by researchers at Oxford University found that 47% of jobs in the U.S. are vulnerable to automation, not just in fields involving manual labor but also increasingly in fields involving complicated decisionmaking.
Looking forward, says Carl Benedikt Frey, co-author of the Oxford study, more and more low-to-medium-skilled jobs will be vulnerable to automation. “Take the autonomous driverless cars being developed by Google. This new technology may lead to workers such as long-haul truck driver being replaced by machines,” he says. “The ability of computers, equipped with new pattern-recognition algorithms, to quickly screen through large piles of documents threatens even occupations such as paralegals and patent lawyers, which are indeed rapidly being automated.” Even the bulk of service and sales jobs, Frey says, from fast-food-counter attendants to medical transcriptionists — the types of fields where the most job growth has occurred over the past decade — are also to be found in the high-risk category.

4. The skills gap

Automation doesn’t just kill jobs, of course, it also creates them. To take just one example, as Cowen notes in his book, according to the U.S. Air Force, it takes about 168 workers to keep a Predator drone in the air for 24 hours. To compare, the operation of an F-16 fighter aircraft requires fewer than 100 people for a mission.
But the new jobs will be far different from the old ones, Cowen argues. Rather than driving a truck, workers will be needed to regularly inspect that the sensors of self-driving vehicles are in good working order. Medical technicians will let software interpret body and brain scans, but they will need to know more about the limitations of the software (to override mistakes or look more closely when necessary) than about traditional medical science. Teachers and professors will be less crucial to the communication of information and grading, and more important for motivating and inspiring (two tasks computers usually cannot manage on their own).
The question to ask in the years to come will be: Do you add value to the computer, or is the computer better off without you? If the answer is the latter, your job is in trouble. In such an economy, the job growth is likely to be strong — as it is now — in very high- and very low-earning jobs. But the middle is in trouble. As Cowen puts it, average is over.

5. Cheap land, cheap houses

So where can people go when their incomes aren’t keeping pace with the rising cost of living? We know they’re headed to Texas. And they’re headed there because land is cheap, and thus housing is cheap.
A typical home in Brooklyn costs more than half a million dollars (and rising rapidly), and 85% of these dwellings are apartments and condos rather than stand-alone homes. They don’t usually have impressive sinks and seamlessly operating air-conditioning fixtures. In Houston, the typical home costs $130,100 — and it is likely a stand-alone and newer than the structure in Brooklyn.
Housing is bigger — and cheaper — in Texas.

6. Cheap living generally

Cowen notes that this cheap cost of living isn’t just limited to housing, it’s a pervasive fact of life in Texas. And it has a huge impact on people’s standards of living:
The lower house prices, along with a generally low cost of living — helped along by cheap labor, cheap produce and cheap gas (currently about $3 a gallon) — really matter when it comes to quality of life … Texas has a higher per capita income than California, adjusted for cost of living, and nearly catches up with New York by the same measure. Once you factor in state and local taxes, Texas pulls ahead of New York — by a wide margin. The website MoneyRates ranks states on the basis of average income, adjusting for tax rates and cost of living; once those factors are accounted for, Texas has the third highest average income (after Virginia and Washington State), while New York ranks 36th.

7. Jobs

Of course, it’s not just cheap living that draws people to Texas. It’s also jobs, as Cowen notes:
In the past 12 months, Texas has added 274,700 new jobs — that’s 12% of all jobs added nationwide and 51,000 more than California added … In fact, from 2002 to 2011, with 8% of the U.S. population, Texas created nearly one-third of the country’s highest-paying jobs.

8. Low taxes

Texas has no income tax. Per resident, it collects roughly $3,500 in taxes overall (including all state and local taxes) every year. By way of contrast, California collects $4,900 per resident — New York collects a whopping $7,400 per resident. Both states, of course, have income taxes.
People are going to Texas because it’s a low-cost, low-tax state. But they’re also migrating to other Sun Belt states, like Colorado, Arizona and South Carolina, which have similar policy profiles.

9. The rise of the ‘new cowboys’

These folks moving to Texas are a bit like the mythical cowboys of our past — self-reliant, for better or worse. As Cowen predicts in his piece, a new generation looks set to repudiate work and consumerism in favor of a simpler, off-the-grid way of life:
A new class of Americans will become far more numerous. They will despair at finding good middle-class jobs and decide to live off salaries that are roughly comparable to today’s lower-middle-class incomes. Some will give up trying so hard — but it won’t matter as much as it used to, because they won’t have to be big successes to live ­relatively well.

10. The rise of micro-houses

Cowen even predicts that micro-houses will become popular as people seek out super-low-cost living:

In the coming decades, some people may even go to extremes in low-cost living, like making their homes in ­micro-houses (of, say, about 400 sq. ft. and costing $20,000 to $40,000) or going off the grid entirely. Brad Kittel, owner of Tiny Texas Houses, blogs about his small homes built from salvaged materials at tinytexashouses.com. His business, based in the small rural community of Luling, east of San Antonio, offers custom homes, plans and lessons on how to be a salvage miner. So far he has built about 75 tiny homes … The micro-home trend is being watched by traditional homebuilders as well. Texas-based developer D.R. Horton, a member of the New York Stock Exchange and one of the largest homebuilders in the country, built 29 micro-homes sized from 364 to 687 sq. ft. in Portland, Ore., last year.

In some ways, Cowen says, the new settlements of a Texas-like America could come to resemble trailer parks. “The next Brooklyn may end up somewhere in the Dakotas,” he writes. “Fargo, anyone?”
What it all adds up to is a future where many more Americans live in Texas — and much of the rest of America looks more and more like the Lone Star State.
Among the policies Cowen proposes as we move into this future: cheaper education (to allow workers to upgrade their skills), looser building and zoning regulations (to radically reduce the price of housing across America), and a loosening of occupational licensing at the state and local level (to open up many more low-skill jobs).

Texas, he writes, is “America’s America,” where Americans go when they need a fresh start. And a little more Texas could go a long way.
     
     
  #147  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 5:30 AM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Originally Posted by JAYNYC View Post
Obviously not. Anyone with half a brain (or access to data) knows this.



Plenty. Like tons.

I'll just leave this right here (and yes, I know it's 6 years old but that's besides the point as the trends have continued to this day, and yes, I know it focuses on COL as opposed to recreational options - it's TIME magazine, not CNTraveller):

http://ideas.time.com/2013/10/17/10-...is-our-future/

Tyler Cowen’s 10 Reasons Texas Is Our Future

It's big. It's hot. It's cheap. And, according to Tyler Cowen, it's where America's 'new cowboys' are blazing a path for the nation to follow

By Ryan Sager
Oct. 17, 2013

The crisis may be over (for the time being) in Washington. But the crisis for America’s middle class continues, as middle-income jobs get harder to find and the cost of living gets harder to bear. Where can Americans turn for answers? In a word: Texas.
In the cover story of this week’s TIME magazine, libertarian economist Tyler Cowen, author of the new book Average Is Over, looks at why so many Americans are headed to the Lone Star State. And he comes to a surprising conclusion. For better or worse, he argues, it’s because Texas is our future.
Based on Cowen’s research, here are 10 reasons why America’s future is going to look a lot more like Texas:

1. Everyone’s moving there

More Americans are moving to Texas than to any other state. As Cowen notes in the piece:
Texas is America’s fastest-growing large state, with three of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country: Austin, Dallas and Houston. In 2012 alone, total migration to Texas from the other 49 states in the Union was 106,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Since 2000, 1 million more people have moved to Texas from other states than have left … Over the past 20 years, more than 4 million Californians have moved to Texas.

2. The middle-class squeeze

We’re creating jobs at the low end of the income spectrum — 58% of jobs created since the end of the Great Recession pay less than $13.83 an hour. However, it’s not that incomes are stagnant generally. Earners at the top have done very well — but the gains have been distributed quite unevenly. Last year the top 1% of earners took home 19.3% of household income, their largest share since 1928. The top 10% of earners didn’t do so badly either, taking home a rec­ord 48.2% of household income.
The middle-income job is disappearing, at the same time that holding onto a middle-class lifestyle is becoming more expensive. As a 2010 report by the Department of Commerce found, looking at economic data from the past two decades, “The prices for three large components of middle-class expenses have increased faster than income: the cost of college, the cost of health care and the cost of a house.”

3. Automation

One of the big reasons behind the middle-class squeeze is automation — and it’s only going to get worse, possibly much worse. A recent study by researchers at Oxford University found that 47% of jobs in the U.S. are vulnerable to automation, not just in fields involving manual labor but also increasingly in fields involving complicated decisionmaking.
Looking forward, says Carl Benedikt Frey, co-author of the Oxford study, more and more low-to-medium-skilled jobs will be vulnerable to automation. “Take the autonomous driverless cars being developed by Google. This new technology may lead to workers such as long-haul truck driver being replaced by machines,” he says. “The ability of computers, equipped with new pattern-recognition algorithms, to quickly screen through large piles of documents threatens even occupations such as paralegals and patent lawyers, which are indeed rapidly being automated.” Even the bulk of service and sales jobs, Frey says, from fast-food-counter attendants to medical transcriptionists — the types of fields where the most job growth has occurred over the past decade — are also to be found in the high-risk category.

4. The skills gap

Automation doesn’t just kill jobs, of course, it also creates them. To take just one example, as Cowen notes in his book, according to the U.S. Air Force, it takes about 168 workers to keep a Predator drone in the air for 24 hours. To compare, the operation of an F-16 fighter aircraft requires fewer than 100 people for a mission.
But the new jobs will be far different from the old ones, Cowen argues. Rather than driving a truck, workers will be needed to regularly inspect that the sensors of self-driving vehicles are in good working order. Medical technicians will let software interpret body and brain scans, but they will need to know more about the limitations of the software (to override mistakes or look more closely when necessary) than about traditional medical science. Teachers and professors will be less crucial to the communication of information and grading, and more important for motivating and inspiring (two tasks computers usually cannot manage on their own).
The question to ask in the years to come will be: Do you add value to the computer, or is the computer better off without you? If the answer is the latter, your job is in trouble. In such an economy, the job growth is likely to be strong — as it is now — in very high- and very low-earning jobs. But the middle is in trouble. As Cowen puts it, average is over.

5. Cheap land, cheap houses

So where can people go when their incomes aren’t keeping pace with the rising cost of living? We know they’re headed to Texas. And they’re headed there because land is cheap, and thus housing is cheap.
A typical home in Brooklyn costs more than half a million dollars (and rising rapidly), and 85% of these dwellings are apartments and condos rather than stand-alone homes. They don’t usually have impressive sinks and seamlessly operating air-conditioning fixtures. In Houston, the typical home costs $130,100 — and it is likely a stand-alone and newer than the structure in Brooklyn.
Housing is bigger — and cheaper — in Texas.

6. Cheap living generally

Cowen notes that this cheap cost of living isn’t just limited to housing, it’s a pervasive fact of life in Texas. And it has a huge impact on people’s standards of living:
The lower house prices, along with a generally low cost of living — helped along by cheap labor, cheap produce and cheap gas (currently about $3 a gallon) — really matter when it comes to quality of life … Texas has a higher per capita income than California, adjusted for cost of living, and nearly catches up with New York by the same measure. Once you factor in state and local taxes, Texas pulls ahead of New York — by a wide margin. The website MoneyRates ranks states on the basis of average income, adjusting for tax rates and cost of living; once those factors are accounted for, Texas has the third highest average income (after Virginia and Washington State), while New York ranks 36th.

7. Jobs

Of course, it’s not just cheap living that draws people to Texas. It’s also jobs, as Cowen notes:
In the past 12 months, Texas has added 274,700 new jobs — that’s 12% of all jobs added nationwide and 51,000 more than California added … In fact, from 2002 to 2011, with 8% of the U.S. population, Texas created nearly one-third of the country’s highest-paying jobs.

8. Low taxes

Texas has no income tax. Per resident, it collects roughly $3,500 in taxes overall (including all state and local taxes) every year. By way of contrast, California collects $4,900 per resident — New York collects a whopping $7,400 per resident. Both states, of course, have income taxes.
People are going to Texas because it’s a low-cost, low-tax state. But they’re also migrating to other Sun Belt states, like Colorado, Arizona and South Carolina, which have similar policy profiles.

9. The rise of the ‘new cowboys’

These folks moving to Texas are a bit like the mythical cowboys of our past — self-reliant, for better or worse. As Cowen predicts in his piece, a new generation looks set to repudiate work and consumerism in favor of a simpler, off-the-grid way of life:
A new class of Americans will become far more numerous. They will despair at finding good middle-class jobs and decide to live off salaries that are roughly comparable to today’s lower-middle-class incomes. Some will give up trying so hard — but it won’t matter as much as it used to, because they won’t have to be big successes to live ­relatively well.

10. The rise of micro-houses

Cowen even predicts that micro-houses will become popular as people seek out super-low-cost living:

In the coming decades, some people may even go to extremes in low-cost living, like making their homes in ­micro-houses (of, say, about 400 sq. ft. and costing $20,000 to $40,000) or going off the grid entirely. Brad Kittel, owner of Tiny Texas Houses, blogs about his small homes built from salvaged materials at tinytexashouses.com. His business, based in the small rural community of Luling, east of San Antonio, offers custom homes, plans and lessons on how to be a salvage miner. So far he has built about 75 tiny homes … The micro-home trend is being watched by traditional homebuilders as well. Texas-based developer D.R. Horton, a member of the New York Stock Exchange and one of the largest homebuilders in the country, built 29 micro-homes sized from 364 to 687 sq. ft. in Portland, Ore., last year.

In some ways, Cowen says, the new settlements of a Texas-like America could come to resemble trailer parks. “The next Brooklyn may end up somewhere in the Dakotas,” he writes. “Fargo, anyone?”
What it all adds up to is a future where many more Americans live in Texas — and much of the rest of America looks more and more like the Lone Star State.
Among the policies Cowen proposes as we move into this future: cheaper education (to allow workers to upgrade their skills), looser building and zoning regulations (to radically reduce the price of housing across America), and a loosening of occupational licensing at the state and local level (to open up many more low-skill jobs).

Texas, he writes, is “America’s America,” where Americans go when they need a fresh start. And a little more Texas could go a long way.
Its one guys opinion...from 2013...
Its as pointless as prediicting the future
As trying to explain a map to some one of
Your "informed" intelligence.
Nobody knows.
Not even ....(gasp) Time Magazine. Who reads this anymore, anyway?
But there is evidence every place slows down.
So ..

I'm also pretty sure California economy is stronger now than in 2013.
It doesn't even matter. There's no point of arguing with an idiot.

Last edited by LA21st; Oct 23, 2019 at 5:51 AM.
     
     
  #148  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 6:09 AM
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It wouldn’t matter, especially if one assumes this growth would be spread across the Southern CA metro area rather than a “Manhattanization” of the corridor between downtown LA and Santa Monica.
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There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
     
     
  #149  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 11:12 AM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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Texas' growth is almost entirely dependent on whether or not the U.S. is welcoming to Latin American immigration. The main impetus to growth is extremely high birthrates due to a young, Latina population in child-bearing age.

I also have no clue what they mean by "cheap land" and "cheap living". Neither are obviously true, and if Texas gets more desirable, neither will be remotely true. Texas has high property taxes, and consumer goods cost the same as anywhere else in the U.S.
     
     
  #150  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 11:23 AM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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The part about the tiny houses sounds depressing as hell. "Resemble trailer parks". Whoo hoo. What an exciting future that is.
It also makes no sense.

This whole thing started because I said it's mostly col why people move to Texas. This guy gets offended, and then finds an article...from 2013...that mostly references col.
It's hilarious. I guess Time Magazine isn't informed enough.

Last edited by LA21st; Oct 23, 2019 at 3:16 PM.
     
     
  #151  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 12:48 PM
ThePhun1 ThePhun1 is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Wishul thinking it will never slow down.
But keep thinking that...I guess?

None of us knows anyway, so it's kinda pointless.
Nothing is forever. But Texas isn't slowing down any time soon.

Last edited by ThePhun1; Oct 23, 2019 at 3:30 PM.
     
     
  #152  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:04 PM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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Nothing is forever. But Texas isn't slowing down any t ime soon.
And neither is migration from California to Texas.
     
     
  #153  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:29 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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Texas' growth is almost entirely dependent on whether or not the U.S. is welcoming to Latin American immigration. The main impetus to growth is extremely high birthrates due to a young, Latina population in child-bearing age.

I also have no clue what they mean by "cheap land" and "cheap living". Neither are obviously true, and if Texas gets more desirable, neither will be remotely true. Texas has high property taxes, and consumer goods cost the same as anywhere else in the U.S.
Thats not actually what the demographics are at all. And most "latina's" drop to domestic birth rates after the first generation.

From what I can tell declining birthrates is a function of post industrialization besides certain unique religious groups like Mormons, Orthodox Jews and Amish etc. Almost every country around the world sees a precipitous decline in birthrates as soon as they are fully developed.

the USA has bucked that trend for quite a while because we have a situation where affording a home to raise a family was relatively cheap compared to everywhere else, we had a higher percentage of religious people and incoming migration from non-industrialized countries with high birthrates.

Actually if you look at how things are shaping most of the world will have a higher average age than the USA in 10-20 years including places like China and India with only some very poor African and Asian countries maintaining super high agricultural style birth rates.
     
     
  #154  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:32 PM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
The part about the tiny houses sounds depressing as hell. "Resemble trailer parks". Whoo hoo. What an exciting future that is.
It also makes no sense.

This whole thing started because I said it's mostly col why people move to Texas. This guy gets offended, and then finds an article...from 2013...that mostly references col.
It's hilarious. I guess Time Magazine isn't informed enough.
Yes, I would much rather live in a state where two of their large cities have home costs around 1 million dollars. Seems a lot better.

Fact is, a lot of people can't afford California. If you want to live on welfare, it ain't so bad. If you are rich or old(had your home for a long time), it ain't so bad. But if you are part of the majority of Americans, it makes zero sense.
     
     
  #155  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:41 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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When did I say everyone's trying to move to California? It's known to be too expensive for most people.

That said, alot of people who aren't on welfare or rich do well here. It's insane to think only about these extremes, which certain people do on these types of forums. There's 40 million people here. Use your head-you think THEY"RE ALL ON WELFARE OR RICH? NYC gets this same treatment. It's crazy.

On the flip side of this thinking, what's so great about being priced out to a state or city you dont really want to move to? On social media and in real life, there's countless people (from all over) complaining how they dislike or hate Texas, Arizona, Florida, Georgia etc and are only there for COL and would move the first chance they get. It's not OK for alot of people.
     
     
  #156  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:47 PM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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When did I say everyone's trying to move to California? It's known to be too expensive for most people.

That said, alot of people who aren't on welfare or rich do well here. It's insane to think only those two extremes which, certain people do on these types of forums. There's 40 million people here. Use your head-you think THEY"RE ALL ON WELFARE OR RICH?

On the flip side of this thinking, what's so great about being priced out to a state you dont really want to move to? On social media, there's countless people (from all over) complaining how they dislike or hate Texas, Arizona, Florida, Georgia etc and are only there for COL and would move they first chance they get.
Yeah, but you quoted some dudes articles talking about tiny homes in Texas(which I've never seen btw). So I am just assuming shit too lol

Of course not all or most people are rich(that's a relative term) or on welfare in California. But how many "middle class" people in California are feeling the squeeze of everything on Earth being more expensive there? Probably a majority. How many people are spending way too much of their income on housing and transportation? Probably way too many.

Well, COL is extremely important. Its way more important that I can afford a home and food over having good weather or some mountains. So for those people, I say quit crying. Either make more money to afford your dream state or try to enjoy being middle class in America.
     
     
  #157  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 3:57 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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I only used that quote for the absurdity of it, like that's some kind of bragging point. Who would be allured by future trailer parks? How is that desirable, for anyone?

I personally wouldn't want to be in city/state I'm unhappy in, and I'm not alone in that. COL isn't everything. It depends on what you want.
     
     
  #158  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 4:21 PM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
I only used that quote for the absurdity of it, like that's some kind of bragging point. Who would be allured by future trailer parks? How is that desirable, for anyone?

I personally wouldn't want to be in city/state I'm unhappy in, and I'm not alone in that. COL isn't everything. It depends on what you want.
Oh I get that, I thought it was odd too.

Sure, I get that also. But if you *move* because of COL, then I think its annoying to complain about where you had to move to. If you value other things over COL, great, more power to you. I guess I fall into that category to some extent, I pay more for my 1 bedroom apartment than my sister does for her 3/3 nice suburban home in Arkansas. Even if jobs weren't an issue, I would rather live here(and pay more) than in Arkansas.

But if I couldn't afford to live here and had to move back to Arkansas, I wouldn't complain. I would just deal with my shitty situation.
     
     
  #159  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 4:30 PM
LA21st LA21st is offline
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Yea, I had to move from Koreatown to North Hollywood because my roomate friends found a bigger, cheaper place. I wasn't crazy about it, but made it work.
I do plan to move back to Central LA when I can, even If I have to pay more, because its more convient for everything. People value different things.
     
     
  #160  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 8:09 PM
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JManc JManc is online now
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Texas is beginning to slow down and Houston even more so. The rest of the country is closing the economic and jobs gap offering more options for would be transplants. I think we still have a LOT of room for growth but some of that growth will be shared with other areas traditionally left in the dust by places like Texas. Even my crap hometown has leveled off from decades of population decline.
     
     
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