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  #52481  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2019, 8:20 PM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
I think this is a great image of the current ridge line trail...(from a friend's flickr stream) We don't see the Hollywood sign from this side very often...

Panorama looking north from 1,625 foot Mt Hollywood, Mitch Barrie

(Be sure to scroll right...)

That's 1,708 foot Mt Lee at left (with Hollywood sign below the summit); then 1,820 foot Cahuenga Peak just behind it to the right; then 1,614 foot Mt Chapel;
then 1,582 foot Mt Bell; and finally Mt Baby Bell to the right. M.B.

On loan from Mitch Barrie's photo stream. With Glendale/Burbank on the right and Cahuenga Pass somewhere in the foothill jumble below and to the left of Mt. Lee,
I think this offers a superior view of the ridge line trail.
I think one of the pictures that ER posted a few weeks ago was taken just to the right(out of frame). You can also see Mulholland "Highway" (actually a trail) from Mt. Lee Road to the left to Mt. Hollywood Road at the right below Mt. Chapel. Baby Mt. Bell is sometimes called "Taco Peak" and for about a year had a teahouse just below the summit.

20150714_150155 by BillinGlendaleCA, on Flickr
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  #52482  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2019, 9:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillinGlendaleCA View Post
I think one of the pictures that ER posted a few weeks ago was taken just to the right(out of frame). You can also see Mulholland "Highway" (actually a trail) from Mt. Lee Road to the left to Mt. Hollywood Road at the right below Mt. Chapel. Baby Mt. Bell is sometimes called "Taco Peak" and for about a year had a teahouse just below the summit.

20150714_150155 by BillinGlendaleCA, on Flickr

Oh, I think you're exactly right. They've obviously rebuilt the tea house over the years. Still looks good though, not too pristine.
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  #52483  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2019, 10:47 PM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Oh, I think you're exactly right. They've obviously rebuilt the tea house over the years. Still looks good though, not too pristine.
Actually it was a flash project that a bunch of folk did one morning. Parks and Rec said it wouldn't work there and moved it about 6 months after it was built. They were planning putting it somewhere, but as far as I know, it's still in storage.

ETA: I guess it was only there for 2 months...Here's a bit more on it(and where it was): https://socalhiker.net/hike-to-the-g...park-teahouse/.

Last edited by BillinGlendaleCA; Sep 2, 2019 at 11:06 PM.
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  #52484  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2019, 1:38 AM
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Beaudry Beaudry is offline
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Thought this was pretty cool, a little bit of Old LA coming back, sorta kinda. More Perry Mason filming, images shot recently and posted to Instagram.









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  #52485  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 1:17 AM
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Mount Wilson Hotel Resort?

I've been digging through boxes of family photos looking for pictures of my dad, who passed away quite recently. In one box I stumbled across this undated brochure. I don't think this attraction has been previously mentioned at Noirish Los Angeles, but I could be wrong.







If anyone can share additional photos or information about the hotel, it would be much appreciated.
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  #52486  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 1:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Handsome Stranger View Post
I've been digging through boxes of family photos looking for pictures of my dad, who passed away quite recently.
My condolences, Handsome Stranger. My dad passed away just a few years ago, and I still miss him.

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  #52487  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 5:50 AM
T.J.P. T.J.P. is offline
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I know this is off topic, but I am cross-referencing filming locations from old TV shows and thought maybe one of you L.A. historians might recognize this building, which I suppose is somewhere in the Greater Los Angeles area.

The screen grabs are from productions that aired in 1985, but since they are stock footage from film libraries, they might have been photographed earlier.

www.flickr.com/photos/37847653@N05/48664848251/in/dateposted-public/
This first link shows the property in daylight. It is a screen grab from # 4.20 of "The Fall Guy", a 1985 episode entitled "Spring Break". It's just an establishing shot -- no scene for this episode was filmed at that location.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/378476...posted-public/
There are two guards visible in the clip from "The Fall Guy", one on the balcony on the right and another one between the trees more to the left. This second link is just to show the size and height of the building in question.

The same property was featured in an explosion on "Falcon Crest" in 1985. That was stock footage, too. "Falcon" never filmed there either. Here are screen grabs from
"Falcon Crest":
https://www.flickr.com/photos/378476...posted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/378476...posted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/378476...posted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/378476...posted-public/

Sorry I was unable to post the photos right here. I tried to add them, but they remained invisible. So I added the links.

Does anyone have any idea what and where this might be?

No need to look any longer for the location I tried to identify. Somebody informed me it's Walker McCune's home at 6066 North Paradise View Drive in Paradise Valley, AZ. This seems to be correct. Thanks for taking a look to everyone!
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  #52488  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 6:06 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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.

When a person thinks of cantilevered architecture most think of FLW's Fallingwater.


Few remember the cantilevered wing at the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena. [shown below]



The Huntington Hotel and Swimming Pool, Pasadena California.






Seriously now:

Is it just me, or is this rppc creating an optical illusion?


eBay


.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Sep 4, 2019 at 10:24 PM.
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  #52489  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 6:30 AM
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I don't believe we have seen this RPPC on NLA.

John T. Harris Jeweler - Optical. (formerly Schepps & Harris) c.1911



Found a few days ago on eBay. No longer listed.

You can see the street number, 761 , between Jeweler and Optical.


THE REVERSE



I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your father, Handsome Stranger.


.
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  #52490  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 6:50 AM
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One more RPPC for tonight.

RPPC REAL PHOTO / Leo D. Hyer's House, 1576 W. 37th Place, Los Angeles California [c.1910]


eBay



For easier reading.



There's a possibility the home is still there...but I can't decide if it's the same house.

You can check it out for yourself HERE (it's about the same size..but the dormer is missing)

.
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  #52491  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 9:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
RPPC REAL PHOTO / Leo D. Hyer's House, 1576 W. 37th Place, Los Angeles California [c.1910]



There's a possibility the home is still there...but I can't decide if it's the same house.

You can check it out for yourself HERE (it's about the same size..but the dormer is missing)
I think that the entire front section of the modern-day house is an add-on.

The roofs face in different directions in the old and the modern photo (90° from each other). Also, the winding path in the old photo is much longer than the modern-day front yard would allow.

If you get rid of the yellow section below, the house would pretty much match the layout of the old photo.



Also, the house in question is the only house on the street that doesn't sit back a good 20 feet from the sidewalk - which again makes me think that the yellow section in the photo above is an add-on.



That's my guess and I'm sticking to it!

Last edited by Scott Charles; Sep 4, 2019 at 9:42 AM.
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  #52492  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 10:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
.

When a person thinks of cantilevered architecture most think of FLW's Fallingwater.


Few remember the cantilevered wing at the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena. [shown below]


...................................................................................Heavily damaged in the 1933 earthquake. The wing was removed a few years later.

The Huntington Hotel and Swimming Pool, Pasadena California.






Seriously now:

Is it just me, or is this rppc creating an optical illusion.


eBay


.
As a kid, I dipped in that pool a few times. But what I remember most was the lush Bermuda grass on both sides of the pool. You even got a huge hotel towel to use. The public could use the pool for a dollar.

That hotel was my landing place for the Airport Bus in my Navy days. LAX <-> Huntington Hotel $3 one way....I think the bus left every two or three hours. We lived about 2 miles distant at that time.

Thanks ER for the memories. [I believe the ivy on the side of the hotel gives an illusion.]

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Sep 4, 2019 at 10:32 PM.
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  #52493  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 12:02 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I don't believe we have seen this RPPC on NLA.

John T. Harris Jeweler - Optical. (formerly Schepps & Harris) c.1911



Found a few days ago on eBay. No longer listed.

You can see the street number, 761 , between Jeweler and Optical.


THE REVERSE



I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your father, Handsome Stranger.


.


The name "Schepps" on the window got me wondering if there was a connection between "Formerly Schepps & Harris" and a well-known store here in NY, if not so much to tourists, who of course prefer initials and name recognition. Turns out there is a connection...

From https://www.freemansauction.com/news...seaman-schepps
"Born in New York City in 1881, Seaman Schepps created an eponymous jewelry house, becoming known as “America’s Court Jeweler” for his unique, bold designs, worn by the country’s most prominent society families.

The son of immigrants, his humble beginnings led him to sit outside of the boutique of quintessential New York jeweler David Webb and sketch drawings for his own designs. Schepps left the Lower East Side of Manhattan around the turn of the century, finding work as a traveling salesman in Los Angeles and San Francisco. It was in California that he opened his first jewelry store, “The Virginia Studios,” named for his eldest daughter.

After returning to New York in 1921 with his wife and two children, Schepps opened a store on 6th Avenue, near the storied Algonquin Hotel. He expanded a few years later to a second location, but the stock market crash of 1929 forced Schepps to shutter both shops. The sudden forced closure lasted five years, during which time here focused his business strategy, and when Schepps reopened in 1934at a new location on Madison Avenue, he had developed his own exclusive jewelry designs."


http://seamanschepps.com/

GSV


But back to Los Angeles. Schepps appears to have first had a store, one without Harris in the name, at 621 S. Broadway, as early as 1909. Here is news from the LAT of Oct 3, 1920, on Schepps's Virginia Studios:



Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Sep 4, 2019 at 4:57 PM.
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  #52494  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 12:53 PM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is online now
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1576 W 37th Place

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post



With apologies for the poor wanton commandeering of your graphic Scott Charles.



The original 1907 house was a tiny ol' thing.


First add-on to the rear in 1919.


ladbsdoc.lacity.org



Second add-on to the front in 1936.


ladbsdoc.lacity.org



Resulting in


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  #52495  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 4:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
The name "Schepps" on the window got me wondering if there was a connection between "Formerly Schepps & Harris" and a well-known store here in NY, if not so much to tourists, who of course prefer initials and name recognition. Turns out there is a connection...

From https://www.freemansauction.com/news...seaman-schepps
"Born in New York City in 1881, Seaman Schepps created an eponymous jewelry house, becoming known as “America’s Court Jeweler” for his unique, bold designs, worn by the country’s most prominent society families.

The son of immigrants, his humble beginnings led him to sit outside of the boutique of quintessential New York jeweler David Webb and sketch drawings for his own designs. Schepps left the Lower East Side of Manhattan around the turn of the century, finding work as a traveling salesman in Los Angeles and San Francisco. It was in California that he opened his first jewelry store, “The Virginia Studios,” named for his eldest daughter.

After returning to New York in 1921 with his wife and two children, Schepps opened a store on 6th Avenue, near the storied Algonquin Hotel. He expanded a few years later to a second location, but the stock market crash of 1929 forced Schepps to shutter both shops. The sudden forced closure lasted five years, during which time here focused his business strategy, and when Schepps reopened in 1934at a new location on Madison Avenue, he had developed his own exclusive jewelry designs."


http://seamanschepps.com/

GSV


But back to Los Angeles. Schepps appears to have first had a store, one without Harris in the name, at 621 S. Broadway, as early as 1909. Here is news from the LAT of Oct 3, 1920, on Schepps's Virginia Studios:



===========================

It seems in keeping with Noirishness to look a moment into the demise of Mr. John T. Harris, "Successor to Schepps & Harris" (but not for very long . . . ):




both images from L.A. Times (dates as given in the images) via ProQuest via CSULB Library. Layout of articles rearranged for your viewing pleasure.

Does it strike me as interesting that "a young man, who works as an accountant at the club, was at work in Harris' room from 8 o'clock until 11 yesterday morning. He says he heard Harris snore. Manager Witt says that he does not know the name of this young man"? Nope, nothing odd at all about any of that. Company accountants in social clubs frequently do their best work in the rooms of guests of the establishment; and how can managers be expected to know the names of office employees? And I'm certain that the fact that this was the night before Valentine's Day is a mere happenstance. Fie on anyone who would see anything out of the ordinary in any of this!

Kidding aside, sorry, Mr. Harris, you had to live a life of personal and social challenges, with such an end.
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  #52496  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 4:56 PM
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More on Schepps in LA--apparently he was a BSD at the LAAC, which is interesting considering that J. T. Harris died at the club, as odinthor has just dicovered:


LAHerald Aug 3, 1908/Apr 13, 1909

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Sep 4, 2019 at 5:43 PM.
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  #52497  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 4:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post
With apologies for the poor wanton commandeering of your graphic Scott Charles.

The original 1907 house was a tiny ol' thing.

First add-on to the rear in 1919.


ladbsdoc.lacity.org

Second add-on to the front in 1936.


ladbsdoc.lacity.org

Resulting in

Wow, great sleuthing there, Noir_Noir! That old house seems to have about tripled in size!
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  #52498  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 5:56 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
===========================

It seems in keeping with Noirishness to look a moment into the demise of Mr. John T. Harris, "Successor to Schepps & Harris" (but not for very long . . . ):




both images from L.A. Times (dates as given in the images) via ProQuest via CSULB Library. Layout of articles rearranged for your viewing pleasure.

Does it strike me as interesting that "a young man, who works as an accountant at the club, was at work in Harris' room from 8 o'clock until 11 yesterday morning. He says he heard Harris snore. Manager Witt says that he does not know the name of this young man"? Nope, nothing odd at all about any of that. Company accountants in social clubs frequently do their best work in the rooms of guests of the establishment; and how can managers be expected to know the names of office employees? And I'm certain that the fact that this was the night before Valentine's Day is a mere happenstance. Fie on anyone who would see anything out of the ordinary in any of this!

Kidding aside, sorry, Mr. Harris, you had to live a life of personal and social challenges, with such an end.
Sounds like a classic case of sleep apnea. History of heart trouble and audible snoring.

Earl
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  #52499  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 7:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Handsome Stranger View Post
I've been digging through boxes of family photos looking for pictures of my dad, who passed away quite recently. In one box I stumbled across this undated brochure. I don't think this attraction has been previously mentioned at Noirish Los Angeles, but I could be wrong.



If anyone can share additional photos or information about the hotel, it would be much appreciated.
My condolences too, HS.


The hotel in this October 22, 1930, photo appears to be the same building shown in your brochure. Please note the tree behind the hotel
at the center of the photo:



248055 @ Huntington Digital Library



This c. 1907 photo shows an earlier version of the Mount Wilson Hotel before it burned down in 1913. The tree I've arrowed is the same
one that's behind the hotel in the center of the previous photo:



24883 @ Huntington Digital Library


There are other photos of both versions of the Mount Wilson Hotel at the Huntington Digital Library.
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  #52500  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2019, 8:38 PM
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I became interested in John T. Harris' home address, 600 S. Coronado St.:



(Oops, I forgot to caption that last one from 1906: It's from the LA Times of July 15, 1906.)

It seems to have been a single family residence early on, and apartments later.

Now if I only had a picture of the place! The address appears to be just barely off the 1909 Bird's Eye map of L.A.
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