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  #24301  
Old Posted Today, 3:05 AM
CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is online now
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Self Esteem on steroids.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post


According to Wikipedia, the Amsterdam education seems to have worked (maybe too well).

"(Rick) Nelson had a tremendous sexual appetite and a casual attitude toward sex, once estimating he had had sex with thousands of women"
There's one thing that Rick Nelson had going for him.

He had parents who loved him, adored him and MOST importantly, they promoted his natural talents through their connections. [Even though his voice was processed.]

This is a powerful combination that few kids ever have. It builds self esteem, which is something most young people don't have. Of course he was basically a decent person....that also helps.



ABC TV

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Today at 3:18 AM.
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  #24302  
Old Posted Today, 9:37 AM
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alester young alester young is offline
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May and Co

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Originally Posted by DTLAdenizen View Post
May Company, Wilshire: 1948 vs 2014




It's a shame that the MAY & Co. art deco signage has been lost on the way. The entrance looks a bit bland without it.
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  #24303  
Old Posted Today, 10:31 AM
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HossC HossC is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post

In reexamining the structures I discovered another pretty structure in the area: Hispano Moresque Tiles and The California Bank. The source indicates the building sate at Beverly and La Brea and there is a listing for the Bank at 175 N. La Brea. The '32 CD has a "La Brea - Wilshire Branch" listing for Cal Bank at 671 S La Brea and there does not appear to be a listing for Beverly and La Brea. this suggests the Bank vacated the 175 address for bigger digs at 671. Hispano Moresque was at 173 N. La Brea.

The mundane structure benefitted immensely from the imaginative use of tile.

~1929 Hispano Moresque Tile Co. and California Bank at La Brea and Beverly 173-175 N. La Brea
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...J2VLG63NKH.jpg

http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...CXXP18THNH.jpg
I've played with the levels and repaired the marks on the left of the second image.


California State Library

I wondered what became of this lovely building, so I took the Googlemobile to La Brea Avenue. The address of the building below is listed on the company's website as "169-A North La Brea Avenue", but the building just visible on the left is clearly marked "169" (visible in GSV, not in this picture). I then overlaid this image onto the first of Godzilla's pictures and it seemed to match proportionally. Even the small square holes halfway down the top of the fascia lined up perfectly.


GSV

Google's Streetview also lets you have an extensive walk around the interior of Adesso Eclectic Imports. Here's a view of the upper floor looking towards the front.


GSV

While I was Googling the address, I came across a review on www.citysearch.com for a now closed local restaurant called Campanile (it was at 624 S La Brea Avenue). User "gerryjim" said:

"We especially enjoyed the fountain in the courtyard made in the late 20's by a tile company whose headquarters was just up the street at 173 N. La Brea. The tilery was called Hispano Moresque."

I managed to find this picture of the fountain. I wonder if the tile shop and bank were this color?


www.scpr.org

I was going to ask if anyone had been to Campanile's replacement, République, to see if the fountain is still there, but I see they've moved it outside next to the sidewalk.


GSV
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  #24304  
Old Posted Today, 3:25 PM
oldstuff oldstuff is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post


It looks like your research methods are similar to mine, Lorendoc. Like you, I'm not convinced that the two buildings are the same. I also drew a blank trying to find an "M.A. Lewis" in the real estate listings, although I did find an M A Lewis listed as vice president of the Lewis Holding Co, which does appear in the real estate section. Their address is listed as 1000 S Oxford Avenue, which is at the intersection with Olympic Boulevard. Having said that, I can't see anything on the Historic Aerials images that looks like the building in the picture, so the names may just be a coincidence. Later CDs list the Lewis Holding Co with an address on Olympic Boulevard on the same block. The building currently at that location is the Koreatown Galleria, owned by ... the Lewis Holding Company.

Regarding the other company, there are numerous references to the S J Clark(e) Publishing Company in the bibliographies of books, but no address is given. It was a branch of a company based in Chicago, and seems to have operated in Los Angeles in the '20s and '30s. Again, this may have nothing to do with the building we're discussing.
With regard to M.A. Lewis, I find a Maurice Ashley Lewis, born in Nebraska in 1897 and living in Omaha until about 1924. He was in real estate, both in Nebraska and in LA where he appears in the 1930 census. That census shows an address of 2217 1/2 Beverly Blvd, but this was apparently a residence. Somewhat later, he was apparently living at 5851 Melrose. While that building is still there, (built in 1923) it is not the one in the pictures. There is another address which appears on his draft registration card for WWII as his place of business , 330 N. Larchmont, but this is not the same building and the assessor does not have a build date for the building that is there now.

Mr Lewis died in 1955 and is buried in Forest Lawn, Glendale. A mystery.
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  #24305  
Old Posted Today, 5:10 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
I've played with the levels and repaired the marks on the left of the second image.


California State Library

I wondered what became of this lovely building, so I took the Googlemobile to La Brea Avenue. The address of the building below is listed on the company's website as "169-A North La Brea Avenue", but the building just visible on the left is clearly marked "169" (visible in GSV, not in this picture). I then overlaid this image onto the first of Godzilla's pictures and it seemed to match proportionally. Even the small square holes halfway down the top of the fascia lined up perfectly.


GSV

While I was Googling the address, I came across a review on www.citysearch.com for a now closed local restaurant called Campanile (it was at 624 S La Brea Avenue). User "gerryjim" said:

"We especially enjoyed the fountain in the courtyard made in the late 20's by a tile company whose headquarters was just up the street at 173 N. La Brea. The tilery was called Hispano Moresque."

I managed to find this picture of the fountain. I wonder if the tile shop and bank were this color?


www.scpr.org

I was going to ask if anyone had been to Campanile's replacement, République, to see if the fountain is still there, but I see they've moved it outside next to the sidewalk.


GSV

Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
624 S La Brea known as Campanile of late.

Present
google

1928




1937
LAPL

1940
USCDigital












I, too, would appreciate seeing the Hispano Moresque facade in all of its garish glory. Your Calpet Station image evoked a similar interest.


http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ireTexaco1.jpg http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17969

http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...ostcount=18048




"Moorish" or "Moirish"?


The nod toward Moorish architecture and/or Spanish Colonial design provided immeasurable charm to the neighborhood. That also included the adornment of so many structures with odd/quirky bits of tile, the absence of which, makes for an unmistakable and significant loss. (The same might be said for ornamental wrought iron, examples of which appear in many of the attached photos.)


The addition of tiled fountains was a nice touch too.


The late lamented ModernCraft building formerly at 900 N. La Brea.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00096/00096761.jpg http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=10394


HossC: Interesting discovery regarding the Campanile fountain's connection with Hispano Moresque. Did the Hispano Moresque "studio" design and manufacture tile or merely sell it? Wonder what other noteworthy structures made use of the studio. Once the neighboring structures were completed, could that have been responsible for HM's disappearance in the early '30s?

NLA has mentioned tiles manufactured locally, e.g., Catalina and Malibu. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=11522 etc.





What hath wrought Iron?

1926 Fox Ritz Wilshire and Sycamore

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17459


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  #24306  
Old Posted Today, 6:01 PM
Godzilla Godzilla is offline
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Can anyone supply information regarding the design or ornamentation directly above the sconce in the following image? It bears a strange resemblance to a Coat of Arms-Family Crest, or an open book, or the Ten Commandments? La Brea Cuneiform? An homage to Cecil B. DeMille?

The wrought iron encasing the window is also topped by some sort of Family crest-ornamentation.







Pretty Courtyard that could have done well to retain the fountain.
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...9QLEXM1LE9.jpg
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  #24307  
Old Posted Today, 6:23 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alester young View Post



It's a shame that the MAY & Co. art deco signage has been lost on the way. The entrance looks a bit bland without it.
Although you may be aware that the building will be the new home of the AMPAS Museum in a few years? I don't know for certain what that front entrance will look like, but there have been images of AMPAS projecting an Oscar silhouette onto it.

Even though the remodel and new consruction hasn't started, AMPAS has been using the space for fundraising events and now, as you see in the photograph, they are having the Hollywood Costume Exhibition there. I attended it, in fact, yesterday afternoon. (George Lucas was there.)

The entrance to it is from a common area between the May Co. and LACMA next door. It's on the northeast side of the May Co. building. There's a walkway lined with greenery and park benches. They have a red carpet area with a giant oscar for photo taking before entering. Something on that side of the building I'd never noticed before were a vertical row of windows on the northeast corner of each floor that had a small balcony area. Perhaps these were offices on each floor?

In any case, I saw this photo from last June taken from Wilshire Blvd. showing the south side of the May Co. building where AMPAS was promoting something, perhaps the official agreement with LACMA or perhaps the costume exhibition.


http://ronslog.typepad.com/ronslog/2...agreement.html
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  #24308  
Old Posted Today, 6:28 PM
Presarch Presarch is offline
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LA musician and architect here, a longtime lurker, off and on at least but have never have made a post (no idea how to put up pics) though I could add LA lore, having grown up here. Really an interesting off-beat dig into the LA's history, but, presuming to know history of a place is one thing, people another. For instance with this last post how can you presume to know the Nelsons and their family life as if you actually knew them? Maybe they were decent, the parents "good" parents, could very well be, but how would a person know for sure unless you did know them, live with them? It is also strange that you would say "most young people don't have self esteem"--gross overstatement. May be stick to the buildings??


Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
There's one thing that Rick Nelson had going for him.

He had parents who loved him, adored him and MOST importantly, they promoted his natural talents through their connections. [Even though his voice was processed.]

This is a powerful combination that few kids ever have. It builds self esteem, which is something most young people don't have. Of course he was basically a decent person....that also helps.



ABC TV
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  #24309  
Old Posted Today, 6:44 PM
CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Presarch View Post
LA musician and architect here, a longtime lurker, off and on at least but have never have made a post (no idea how to put up pics) though I could add LA lore, having grown up here. Really an interesting off-beat dig into the LA's history, but, presuming to know history of a place is one thing, people another. For instance with this last post how can you presume to know the Nelsons and their family life as if you actually knew them? Maybe they were decent, the parents "good" parents, could very well be, but how would a person know for sure unless you did know them, live with them? It is also strange that you would say "most young people don't have self esteem"--gross overstatement. May be stick to the buildings??
Welcome to the Forum, Presarch......looking forward to your posts.

Its really not difficult to ''know people''. A lot has been written about people over the many years. Many people have given eyewitness reports of people. What I do is read and assimilate this information. It is from that information that I make my remarks about people.

Buildings are nice but I also like people. Without the people, the buildings are void of meaning and value.

A good example is actress Joan Crawford. Its from writings about her that we have come to know her.


Interesting film....Mommie Dearest...movie trailer:

http://youtu.be/HfFS0vrB8zY

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Today at 7:09 PM.
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  #24310  
Old Posted Today, 7:05 PM
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HossC HossC is online now
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

HossC: Interesting discovery regarding the Campanile fountain's connection with Hispano Moresque. Did the Hispano Moresque "studio" design and manufacture tile or merely sell it? Wonder what other noteworthy structures made use of the studio. Once the neighboring structures were completed, could that have been responsible for HM's disappearance in the early '30s?
I did some more digging into the Hispano-Moresque Tile Company. The following examples of their work are from wellstile.com. The first two are different patterns made from the same set of tiles.


wellstile.com/wellstile.com


wellstile.com/wellstile.com

Among their description were the quotes below (they refer to the last two designs). Like most sources, they say the company was in business between 1927 and 1932, although a couple extend that to 1934.

Here is a Tunisian-inspired vintage tile made using the cuerda seca, or dry line method. The smooth surface has bright colorful glazes with a satiny finish. Although this company was not in business for very long, there are some very impressive installations all over the Los Angeles area.

This is a lovely round or tea tile, well executed in the “California” colors of yellow, orange and green-turquoise. The Persian-influenced design is a stylized flower. A bit of Hollywood trivia: Charlie Chaplin’s office was located across the street from the Hispano Moresque showroom, and both his home and office had installations of Hispano Moresque tiles.


A little more information from curiousclay.com.

The company's showroom was grandiose, but it is still unclear where the tiles were produced. It's possible that Hispano-Moresque used the D. & M. factory for their production, and that would explain a lot of the similarities in the decoration of these two companies' tiles.

The LA Times mentions the Campanile's fountain in a 2001 article about where to find interesting vintage tiles. It also includes another Charlie Chaplin connection.

Have dinner at one of L.A.'s top restaurants, Campanile (624 S. La Brea Ave., [323] 938-1447). Charlie Chaplin started construction of this building in 1929 but, before it was done, lost it to his first wife, Lita Grey, in a divorce settlement. The building was adapted in the late 1980s by architect Josh Schweitzer, who kept the stunning tile fountain at the entrance. The tiles were manufactured by the Hispano Moresque Tile Co. (1927-32). The majority of the company's designs were yellow, orange and turquoise green with Moorish designs.

Finally, artslant.com still have information on their website regarding a 2008 exhibition. It gives a good bit of background to the Hispano-Moresque Tile Company and the previously mentioned D&M Tile Company.

The installation features hundreds of tiles, murals, tables, ceramics, and historic photographs from two little known Southern California tile companies, D & M Tile and Hispano-Moresque Tile. By showing the tile products of both manufacturers, side by side, the exhibition highlights the similarities and differences between the two and sheds light on some unanswered questions about the companies.

D&M Tile Company was named after John Davies and John McDonald who founded the company in 1928. John ‘Jack’ Davies, a Welshman, had been apprenticed at the Doulton & Co pottery in London, England before his migration to the US in 1910. Working first on Staten Island, his westward journey took him through Kansas, Missouri, and Spokane, Washington before arriving in Los Angeles to take up a superintendent post at Pacific Clay products. Here he experimented on the glazes and designs that would form the basis of D&M Tiles. His partner John McDonald handled D&M business and sales. D&M’s bright Moorish-inspired tiles were used at The Mission Inn in Riverside, Balboa Park in San Diego and on Grace Line ocean liners of the 1930s. The company weathered the great depression but in 1939 Jack Davies died at the age of 58. Harry Hicks of Hispano-Moresque Tile then acquired D&M’s kilns, inventory and glaze formulas.

Hispano-Moresque was founded in 1927 by Harry C. Hicks, an English stained-glass maker. In what was seen as a shrewd commercial move, two years later he re-located to North La Brea Avenue, next door to the popular Arts and Crafts Building. The move attracted a discerning clientele and Hispano-Moresque tile was used in many notable buildings, including Charlie Chaplin’s offices on La Brea, Villa Aurora in Pacific Palisades and Scotty’s Castle in Death Valley.
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  #24311  
Old Posted Today, 7:38 PM
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HossC HossC is online now
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Originally Posted by HossC View Post

I had a look through the USC library for a picture of the Chief Bar at 513 S Main. I haven't found a ground level view yet ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post

drat.
By the time I found a lower angle shot at LAPL, it was already 1920, and the bar had been replaced by Karl's Kustom Shoe Store (which was apparently their "Store No 2").


LAPL

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post

unitedartists.com/

Looks like it started out as the Waldorf in the Waldorf Hotel, at 521 S Main, later becoming the Waldorf Cellar, as it was listed in the '56CD, and seen in the pic at top. Bohemian Los Angeles by Daniel Hurewitz--a good read, btw--mentions in a footnote that 'The official Waldorf liquor license was denied in 1936 on grounds that the business ran 'contrary to public welfare and morals.'"
The Colyear's building had gone by the time this undated shot was taken. To the left of the streetcar, it looks like the Waldorf Cellar has the same design as the night view above. I'm trying to work out if the light-colored building immediately to the right of the Waldorf Cellar is the same one which once housed the Dan Kearney's bar and Karl's Kustom Shoe Store. The fact that it was previously black and covered with signage makes comparison difficult.


LAPL
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  #24312  
Old Posted Today, 8:01 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Thank you for the interesting tile information.


Karl's Kustom Shoe resole? http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...ostcount=11770

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  #24313  
Old Posted Today, 9:16 PM
Presarch Presarch is offline
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Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Welcome to the Forum, Presarch......looking forward to your posts.

Its really not difficult to ''know people''. A lot has been written about people over the many years. Many people have given eyewitness reports of people. What I do is read and assimilate this information. It is from that information that I make my remarks about people.

Buildings are nice but I also like people. Without the people, the buildings are void of meaning and value.

A good example is actress Joan Crawford. Its from writings about her that we have come to know her.


Interesting film....Mommie Dearest...movie trailer:

http://youtu.be/HfFS0vrB8zY

Wow, I guess I can't argue with someone who imagines it is possible to know the actual person who was Joan Crawford from watching-or reading-- "Mommie Dearest". I want to take this site seriously, then sometimes it veers off course. Still some great posts, such as Hoss's and some others, lots of work and thought in those, hate to see them undermined. Oh well, so long. Apologies for chiming in.
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