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Old Posted Oct 28, 2009, 9:38 PM
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Electric Smart Grid - Internet Style Intelligence

'Smart Grid' Gets $3.4 Billion Jolt

http://www.livescience.com/technolog...al-grants.html


President Obama will announce today $3.4 billion in grants to help build a "smart" electric grid aimed at reducing blackouts and cutting utility bills. The grid, as envisioned, would do a better job incorporating wind and solar energy into the nation's electricity supply.

The existing power grid is a patchwork of often antiquated systems that, under stress, can fail to deliver electricity where it's needed. The grants will pay for better transformers at utility companies and also smart meters to help consumers manage their energy use.

"It is fair to say that the current (grid) system is certainly outdated. It's dilapidated," said Carol Browner, the president's top adviser on climate change and energy issues. The new plan is expected to created tens of thousands of jobs.



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Old Posted Oct 28, 2009, 9:41 PM
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The electrical grid of tomorrow will be flexible and self-healing

http://www.engineerlive.com/Power-En...healing/22164/


A smart electrical grid has the potential to play a key role in the effort to lower energy costs for consumers, achieve energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. How can all of this be realised and what can government do to ensure such a grid can be made a reality? Dr Richard Charnah explains.

Firstly, it's important to clarify what is meant by a smart electrical grid; also referred to as a smart grid. It is an electricity transmission and distribution system that is adapted to the changing generation and consumption landscape, enabling it to cope with new challenges arising from market liberalisation, increasing penetration of renewable energy sources and technical developments. From various forums and articles in the media, it is apparent that the term 'smart grids' is used by some interchangeably with smart metering. A smart meter initiative will continue to play a role in helping to deliver a smart electrical grid but it is not a magic bullet - it is only one piece of the jigsaw.

The grid of tomorrow will need to be flexible, accessible, reliable and economical. Our approach to it will need to include superior simulation tools; advanced communications, metering and business systems. We shall also make use of innovative power electronics to improve quality of supply, while next generation network equipment and technologies will have to provide increased and bi-directional, power transfer and reduced energy losses.

There are a number of key challenges that still need to be addressed in order to ensure that a smarter grid can be made a reality - for instance monitoring and control systems to help assure the stability of the system. The UK has the potential for being a major player in renewable energy generation because of the wind energy (and other) opportunities available in the North Sea. An important issue then is not just how to generate the power, but rather how we can ensure that the power will get to where it is needed. The grid of tomorrow will need to have a high degree of flexibility and to be self-healing and reconfigurable. Power electronic technologies such as HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) transmission and Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices will help to address this challenge and allow wind farms to connect to the grid in a more flexible way.

It's also important to note that, with a high proportion of (intermittent) renewable generation, situations will occur where more or less power can be generated than actually needed by consumers, which raises the important question: are we equipped to store surplus (green) energy for release when required? Today's answer would be no! This challenge of energy storage will of course be heightened with the growth of micro-generation technologies, possibly including hydroelectric plants and heat pumps, and the possibility of a massive deployment of electric vehicles, which could appear as a load and as storage. This will also call for bi-directional flow of power in the grid.

How can government make a difference

There will be parts of the network that will need to be upgraded or renewed and new lines/cables will also need to be installed, so making the grid smarter will be an evolutionary process - no-one is suggesting that a brand new grid be built. Government can positively contribute by promoting the field-demonstration of new technologies and supporting the communication between all grid stakeholders including policy makers, regulators, network operators, generators, developers and equipment and technology providers. Introducing a UK-specific Forum for smart grids could be one way of bringing key stakeholders together to understand more clearly the imminent challenges and to help decision making processes in order to ensure the necessary actions are taken. President Obama's recent commitment to invest nearly $4billion to support the efforts of modernising the US electrical grid is a bold move and clearly demonstrates his commitment to making smart grids a reality. With the long awaited energy Government White Paper due out soon, it will be interesting to see the UK government's interpretation of the challenges we face and what it proposes in order to bring us up to speed.
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2009, 1:31 AM
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Italy: Smart grid world leaders


By Dan Jones | 11/18/09 - 08:28

http://www.ngpowereu.com/news/italy-smart-grid/

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Energy analysts in Italy will tell you that they had smart grids before the term even entered into the industries common lexicon.

- Digital smart meters have been mandatory for all electricity providers in Italy since early 2006, and the government's vision is for 95 percent of customers of the approximately 100 electricity companies to be on smart meters by 2011.

- Many believe that 2010 will finally be the year when smart grids go global, and while many nations - including the US - have been championing the technology, they are all playing catch up to the Italians. Washington recently put aside US$4.5 billion from its stimulus package to smarten up the nations antiquated electricity grid and subsidize the roll-out of smart meters nationwide.
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2009, 1:36 AM
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Smart grid leads German revolution


By David Amstell | 10/21/09 - 13:14

http://www.ngpowereu.com/news/smart-grid-revolution/

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Since 1990, Germany has slashed its carbon emissions by 23 percent, cementing its place as a world leader in both energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Now, the country has announced plans to not just continue being a leading light in clean energy, but to actually start a future "energy revolution". Germany plan to use a myriad of different projects such as African deserts covered in ginormous solar plants, to small house-hold projects like cutting edge appliances and mini-power plants in every home. But at the very heart of the nation's efficient energy production plans are smart grids.
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Old Posted Jan 29, 2010, 4:29 PM
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Smart electricity meters set to ramp into 2014


By Larry Dignan | Jan 28, 2010

Read More: http://www.smartplanet.com/business/...nto-2014/3690/

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The number of smart electricity meters in the field are set to explode in the next 5 years, according to ABI Research. Smart electricity meters allow for two-way communication between the meter and the utility. In many respects, these meters are on the front lines of developing the so-called smart grid, which can adapt to power demand and manage spikes in real-time. According to ABI, the worldwide deployment of smart electric meters is expected to rise from 76 million in 2009 to 212 million in 2014.

- In addition, the EU and China are also pushing, or are about to push, smart grid development. Needless to say, technology vendors are more than happy to get a piece of the smart grid pie.
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2010, 4:12 PM
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Smart meters save energy, water, and dollars


28 Jan 2010

by Todd Woody

Read More: http://www.grist.org/article/2010-01...r-and-dollars/

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EBMUD is currently testing smart water meters in 30 households and plans to expand the pilot program to 4,000 homes and businesses later this year.

“It’ll give us better knowledge of where our water is going,” says Harris. “We also thought if we’re going to ask people to use water more efficiently, especially when we’re coming out of a drought and have imposed water restrictions, customers need to have an idea of what their current use is.”

EBMUD’s smart meters take readings every hour and participants in the pilot program will be able to go online to check their consumption and set up an email alert if their water use rises above a certain level. The agency also plans to offer a social networking feature to allow people to compare their water consumption with other households in the area. Nothing like a little peer pressure to get you to turn off the tap.

Given that many states expect to face water shortages in the coming years, one would think we’d be seeing a roll out of smart water meters akin to the national effort being made to smarten up the power grid.

The payoff could be enormous. Water agencies and consumers would be able to detect leaking pipes and toilets in real-time and fix the problem before the water literally goes down the drain.

Imagine a video screen in your shower that displays how many gallons that long hot shower is consuming. Smart water meters would also open the door to financial incentives to get people to use less water and penalize water hogs. (That said, politically powerful agribusiness remains by far the biggest water user.)
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Old Posted Apr 6, 2010, 2:48 PM
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Scaling Up Renewables and the Smart Grid


March 30, 2010

Alison Wise



Read More: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/...grid?cmpid=rss

Quote:
There are many experts who feel that the market potential of renewable energy will only be fully realized if smart grid technologies and services are successful. But first, we need to define the smart grid. In the broadest sense, “smart” refers to a kind of reactive and interactive capability of the energy transmission and distribution infrastructure that is driven both by the generators of electrons and the demands for those electrons. So, the smart grid is defined as “digital energy” by those that focus on the information and communications technologies that will help build the interactive capability of its promise.

For the utility stakeholders, the smart grid is an “intelligent utility infrastructure.” And because of that, utilities with have to change their business model (and sometimes the regulatory context in which that model functions) as well as make changes to their entire operations to encompass the commodity aspect of energy and step up their customer interactions.

Finally, some refer to it as the “modern grid,” recognizing that this new infrastructure represents a 21st century approach to retrofitting a 19th century understanding of energy flows. I will be referring to the interaction between technologies and services in this space as the “smart grid,” since it seems that is becoming the dominant way to describe this new system.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2020, 4:27 AM
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Originally Posted by M II A II R II K View Post
Smart meters save energy, water, and dollars


28 Jan 2010

by Todd Woody

Read More: http://www.grist.org/article/2010-01...r-and-dollars/
10 years since this news appeared on the internet, is this technology available in the world? I want to use this technology because my bathroom uses a shower faucet so it feels very wasteful at all in its use.
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