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  #101  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 8:03 PM
arkhitektor arkhitektor is offline
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Originally Posted by ctobsl View Post
Has anyone seen these new Trax Trains on line yet?
Just curious as to when they will be in use on the Trax line.

Delts, you posted the story, have you heard of anything new?

Anthony

The New Siemens-S70 arriving soon in Salt Lake City
It is my understanding that these new cars aren't going to start showing up until the new lines are open.

http://press.siemens.us/index.php?s=43&item=916
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  #102  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 8:39 PM
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I think their current order on the books is Portland's new mud magnets which they're finishing up finally. UTA's order should come next!
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  #103  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2008, 11:39 AM
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FrontRunner Stretching Further North - New Line Opens

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,700261758,00.html

The Utah Transit Authority is beginning FrontRunner service to Pleasant View in Weber County, with full service expected in January.

Union Station - Northern Metro, Ogden

by bridgepix



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Last edited by delts145; Jan 18, 2009 at 5:49 AM.
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  #104  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2008, 2:19 PM
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Metro Salt Lake City continues... major buildup of freeways/parkways, commuter rail, light rail, and now Trolleys to be added

SLC leaders say streetcars desired after transit tour -
Mayor Becker says a network here needs to be a priority after seeing how much Northwest cities benefit


A Portland, Ore., city-owned streetcar, similar to a proposed Salt Lake City/Sugar House streetcar that would use similar cars. (UTA)

By Derek P. Jensen
The Salt Lake Tribune

Giddy about the efficiency of Portland's downtown streetcar system - and the economic spoils it spurs - Salt Lake City leaders are determined to bring new tracks and trolleys to Utah's capital.
Fresh from a Northwest transit tour of Portland, Seattle and Vancouver with 28 city and business officials, Mayor Ralph Becker says a new streetcar network, beginning in downtown, is a priority for his freshman administration.
"Lay the tracks and development happens," Becker told reporters Thursday morning at City Hall. "That's what we saw place after place."
The vision, shared by the Redevelopment Agency, Salt Lake Chamber and the City Council, is to see streetcars - they stop on each block and charge a fare in some areas - connect to both light- and heavy-rail hubs. Eventually, they could spread into neighborhoods - the planned Sugar House trolley would serve as a model - rendering vehicles unnecessary for capital visitors and residents alike.
"Within a five-year horizon, it's doable," said Bob Farrington, the city's new economic development director.
Call it back to the future for Utah's capital, which once boasted a bustling web of street trolleys but has since seen its 150 miles of track buried by concrete. Becker says resurrecting those lines is not practical, but insists laying new streetcar tracks can be done in 18 months - and it's cheaper than TRAX.
Farrington notes the shorter the mileage, the cheaper the cost, emphasizing that a circulator system downtown would take priority.
"I am sold on the concept and the benefits of streetcars," Councilman J.T. Martin beamed. "That is the future."
Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber president, insisted a system that connects City Creek Center with The Gateway could be complete by the projected opening of downtown's $1.5 billion commercial hub in 2012.
"They are driving economic development through transit," he said about Portland, noting Salt Lake City could do the same.
Indeed, Becker says a key funding component would come from businesses drawn to the new trolley corridors, which could help pay for the infrastructure through special assessments - or property taxes in the case of redevelopment areas. Becker also hopes to tap more federal money with a new administration in Washington, D.C., that he says promises to be more transit-friendly.
The mayor says a bond, placed on a ballot for voters, has not been considered for the system, which generally costs $20 million a mile.
City leaders say a slow-moving trolley network would improve the valley's air quality and reduce the need for businesses to include expensive parking.
No specific route has been picked for new trolley tracks that would be designed to share the road with cars. But, once built, they could help move as much money as people.
D.J. Baxter, the city's Redevelopment Agency director, says Portland's $55 million 2.5-mile system generated $3 billion in private investment over 10 years. It also led to 700 new residences and 4.6 million square feet of commercial construction.
Streetcars, Martin notes, revitalized Portland's once-"derelict" Pearl District. "That really hit home to me," he said. "It's not just talk - it really did happen."
With that in mind, Becker says he would like to identify areas ripe for redevelopment that simply need a "catalyst." Neither Portland nor Seattle, he marvels, had federal funding secured before launching their projects.
Seattle, Becker points out, did not complete its trolley system until last November. As more Utahns forsake their cars for downtown lofts, commute by air-conditioned train - and retirees eyeball City Creek Center's condo towers - Salt Lake City is on the cusp of a similar urban renewal. All of it, the urban planner smiles, is anchored by transit.
"We're really at the front edge of this."

Portland's rolling investment
$55M
Cost of system

2.5 miles
Length of system

$3B
Private investment generated by system

10 years
Time it took to generate investment

700
New homes have been built along system

4.6M
Square feet of commercial construction along system


I am sold on the concept and the benefits of streetcars. That is the future.
-City Councilman J.T. Martin, about streetcars in Salt Lake City.



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  #105  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2008, 1:51 PM
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Green alternatives - Cars that operate without fossil fuels gaining popularity

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,700263987,00.html

Technology for electric vehicles is improving, and they may be more widely available as soon as next year, according to car dealers and consultants at the National Alternative Fuel Vehicle Day Odyssey on Friday.


laura Seitz, Deseret News

Conversions to natural-gas vehicles also are soaring, they said. With natural-gas prices in Utah currently at about 87 cents per gallon, drivers are snapping up any compressed-natural-gas vehicle they can find, and many people are converting their gasoline or diesel vehicle to run on natural gas alone, or to switch between natural gas and gasoline or diesel.

Electric vehicles have batteries that require charging for four to eight hours, at a cost of about $2, said Trevor Sears, sales manager of Silent Green Machines, a car dealership in Salt Lake City.


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  #106  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2008, 12:40 PM
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Breakneck Pace Continues For Salt Lake City Metro Transit Expansion

Video Link - http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=4517410

By Jed Boal

As the nine-year anniversary of TRAX approaches, the Utah Transit Authority is picking up speed on expansion.

TRAX debuted in Dec. 1999 and added commuter rail last spring. In a couple of weeks, UTA will break ground on the Airport TRAX Line. By 2015, the system will reach many more people on the Wasatch Front. Seventy miles of new rails in seven years; that's the plan for UTA by 2015.



If recent demand is any indication of interest, plenty of Utahns are eager to start riding the rails.

Michael Allegra, chief capital development officer for UTA, says, "We've seen double-digit increases in ridership. This month over last year, we're up almost 20 percent on bus and rail."

FrontRunner started service in the spring, linking 45 miles and seven stations to the existing TRAX system in the Salt Lake Valley. But, the expansion is just getting started. Four more lines are under construction and one other is getting close to a groundbreaking.



The West Valley TRAX Line started in June. Workers are tackling the most challenging segment near the spaghetti bowl.

The airport line will be under construction before the end of the month. Both extensions greatly improve transit options in the northern half of the Salt Lake Valley.

The mid-Jordan line started in May. Work continues near Gardner Village and construction on the Draper line should begin next spring.

As for FrontRunner south, construction started in August.

Allegra says, "All five lines will open at about the same time in the next three to four years. We're juggling contracts around to maximize efficiency. We'll see all of those open in at least the next five years."

By the end of the year $400 million will have been spent on the five lines, nearly $1 billion more has been obligated for contracts.












Wednesday, UTA will hold a public meeting on the Draper Transit Corridor project.
It will be at:
Skaggs Catholic Center
300 East 11800 South, Draper
7:30 p.m.
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  #107  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2008, 12:58 PM
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LightRail stop, Downtown Adj., Univ. of Utah. Salt Lake City's east bench and Olympus Cove neighborhood in background. I've found that Salt Lake City is one of the most difficult metros when it comes to deciding where to plant trees around your yard. I'm a tree hugger, so trees are a must. But you really have to consider how big the tree's will become and if they will block the jaw dropping views.


by Stevena07
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  #108  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2008, 1:37 PM
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Salt Lake City Metro - Draper's transit area - "The sky is the limit"

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705260405,00.html

The sky is the limit for new buildings in a new transit-oriented district near Bangerter Highway, and there will be no cap on how many people can live there.

The City Council approved zoning Tuesday that allows for unlimited heights and densities in an effort to persuade the Utah Transit Authority to locate a commuter rail stop in the city...


SLC Metro - Residential Draper's Stunning Views by Planet3rry




Taken from the vantage point of new transit hub district, looking southeast

picasaweb.google.com

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Last edited by delts145; Nov 4, 2008 at 1:47 PM.
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  #109  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2008, 6:01 AM
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Wow! awesome stuff, am glad to see so much happening. I left in 2004 and the progress, especially on the transit front is amazing. I was definitely a Rocky supporter, but the new Becker administration really seems to be on top of their game.
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  #110  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2009, 2:46 PM
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The thing that's good about Mayor Becker over say Rocky is that he's much more of a get along with all sides kind of guy. He has a very kind and charming nature, yet at the same time really gets things done. He is especially good at working with the entire metro in order to move SLC proper along the path of attractive urban density.
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  #111  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2009, 2:47 PM
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UTA receives $428 million in federal money for Mid-Jordan TRAX line

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705276331,00.html


Acting administrator of the FTA Sherry E. Little signs a check for more than $400 million at a press conference in Midvale on Friday. (Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News)

Residents of Salt Lake County's growing west side are $428 million closer to light rail in their neighborhoods after Federal Transit Authority officials presented a check for that amount to the Utah Transit Authority on Thursday...

...The money for the Mid-Jordan extension of the TRAX light rail system is the latest installment in the "federal down payment to support Utah's visionary and ambitious effort to develop a world-class public transportation backbone by 2015," Little said. "This investment helps ensure that Utah, as the crossroads of the West, is well positioned to compete for new jobs, new businesses and a vibrant tourist trade..."

*by Theorris - They are starting work on the new TRAX line that will run from 21st South into West Valley City here in the Salt Lake Valley. This thing had dug a 20 foot plus hole. I couldn't get near enough to the hole to get a good shot of it.
I had a Tonka digger when I was a kid that looked a lot like this one.



.

Last edited by delts145; Jan 10, 2009 at 3:01 PM.
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  #112  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2009, 6:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Urban_logic View Post
I am just giddy about this project!!

Pretty soon I will be able to hop on TRAX and be downtown in no time! I can ride it one way to work in Day Break, and I can ride it the other direction to school down town! But why does it have to take so f'n long?! I suppose there is a chance that it will finish a little early? I think the other two lines finished a little early if I remember correctly. Maybe late 2010 or early 2011?

Quote:
Originally Posted by i-215 View Post
The I-15 contractor lied and said it would take "4-to-5 years" knowing they'd be done in three and a half. It makes good P.R., gives them some slack room, and a nice bonus for finishing early.

Now everybody does it. Especially UTA. Remember how they bragged about Frontrunner North finishing "early"?
..
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  #113  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2009, 6:45 PM
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Funding comes through for mid-Jordan TRAX

$428M » Feds kick in 80% of total tab for line set to open in December 2011.

By Brandon Loomis And Rosemary Winters
The Salt Lake Tribune


Midvale » A federal funding agreement that assures completion of the Mid-Jordan TRAX line is the surest signal that Utah's burgeoning transit system is maturing, Midvale Mayor JoAnn Seghini said Friday at a signing ceremony.

The $428.3 million that the Federal Transit Administration delivered Friday to the Utah Transit Authority marks tremendous progress since Salt Lake Valley voters initially rejected a tax for light rail in the 1990s, she said. This line to West Jordan and others to West Valley City, Draper and the Salt Lake City International Airport will complete a web of transportation alternatives that was hard to imagine when a single rail line opened from Sandy to Salt Lake City in 1999.

"The north-south line is no longer just a line," Seghini said. "We are seeing an integral part of a system."

The Mid-Jordan line, splitting from the north-south line at 6400 South and leading to the Rio Tinto Group's new Daybreak development, is now at least 25 percent complete and on schedule to open in December 2011, according to UTA. Most of the finished work involves signal installation and engineering, rather than track laying.

The grant agreement formally approved Friday represents 80 percent of the project's cost. UTA will cover the rest through sales taxes.

Acting FTA Administrator Sherry Little presented the grant and praised Utah for being at the forefront of a transportation revolution. UTA's start of a rail program back during the buildup to the 2002 Winter Olympics, she added, positions it to have one of the nation's most extensive systems.

"Salt Lake City has been, is and will continue to be ahead of the curve in public transportation," Little said.

The Bush administration has funded the most mass-transit projects in U.S. history, Little said after the ceremony, and she believes the Obama administration will continue the funding stream even in difficult financial times.

"I anticipate that when the Obama folks see future gas prices going up and people sitting in their cars in traffic, they will want to pursue other options," Little said. "I'm really pretty optimistic about the future."

Friday's ceremony was in a vacant lot just east of the rail line's future Gardner Village stop, near the Jordan River. The area is fast being encircled by the plywood walls of unfinished apartments and condominiums along the future rail route. UTA officials said such development, coupled with the massive transit-accessible housing construction emerging at Daybreak, demonstrate the power of rail lines to reshape the valley.

"It's going to be one of the prime places for people to live in this area," UTA General Manager John Inglish said.

The Mid-Jordan line is part of UTA's plans to build 70 miles of new rails by 2015, including the other TRAX lines and a diesel-powered FrontRunner commuter-rail extension from Salt Lake City to Provo.

Streetcar stimulus?
The Utah Transit Authority is studying the possibility of several streetcar lines to link neighborhoods to TRAX, and Salt Lake City has included several in its request for federal economic-stimulus funding under consideration in Congress.

But because the stimulus program is meant to create jobs quickly, it could be tough for Utah's projects to snag money ahead of projects elsewhere that have completed environmental documentation, said Sherry Little, acting administrator of the Federal Transit Administration.

The incoming administration could suspend environmental-permitting rules to speed up projects, she said, but otherwise many other cities are prepared to start work.

"There are projects around the country that are [waiting] on the shelf," she said.

Brandon Loomis



About the route:

» The $428 million federal grant represents 80 percent of the Mid-Jordan line's cost.

» The line will stretch 10.6 miles from Midvale to South Jordan.

» Work is 25 percent complete and is expected to wrap up in late 2011.

» By 2030, the Mid-Jordan line is expected to carry 9,500 passengers.

.
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  #114  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2009, 7:24 AM
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Quote:
The incoming administration could suspend environmental-permitting rules to speed up projects, she said
Oh baby!

Obama is the best Infrastructure Republican I could've ever voted for!
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  #115  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2009, 2:35 PM
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LOL...Agreed 215
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  #116  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2009, 2:36 PM
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Metro Mayor's Smitten. Fall In Love With Streetcar Systems

Streetcar Capitals: Paris, Monaco, Vienna, Munich, Zurich ,Nice, Bordeaux, "and drumroll please.... coming soon, Salt Lake City."

UTA, mayors take European tour
Streetcar pitch » Agency foots bill to sell cities on alternative to light rail.





The streetcars in Bordeaux, France, could provide a model for cities in Utah to connect neighborhoods and commercial centers without the expense of a light-rail system. UTA officials and three mayors toured six European cities last month to view modern streetcar systems. (Courtesy of Kerry Doane / Utah Transit Authority)

By Brandon Loomis
The Salt Lake Tribune


The Utah Transit Authority spent at least $48,000 last month taking nine managers and board members, a business booster and three mayors on a weeklong tour of six European streetcar systems.

The itinerary: Vienna, Munich, Zurich, Nice and Bordeaux, with incidental stops in Monaco and Paris. The goal: peruse state-of-the-art trains unlike any used in North America and consider them as possible connectors that can share traffic lanes with cars to link with Utah's expanding light-rail system. The travel tab: An estimated $3,700 a head -- all from UTA tax dollars.

Critics say that, while neighborhood electric streetcars may be a vital link in the future, right now Utah suffers a budget crunch.

"Everybody's cutting

UTA Riviera streetcars back, economizing and slimming down, and these guys are off to Europe?" said Linda Hilton, an advocate for the poor at Salt Lake City's Crossroads Urban Center. "If [riders] knew their fare increases were being used to pay for UTA officials, who already make large sums of money, to go to Europe, they would be upset."

Linda Parsons, director of the advocacy group Utah Jobs with Justice, agrees that now is not the time to be "flitting around"

"We need mass transit so desperately," she said, "and they seem to foolishly spend [money] at every whim."

But Sen. Curt Bramble, a former UTA board member who admits a "love-hate" relationship with the agency, called the trip a good use of tax dollars, although he said the size of the delegation could be questioned.

"If we're going to spend tens of millions of dollars on a transit project I think that going out in the field and seeing firsthand the projects -- that's money well-spent," said the Provo Republican.

Streetcars are cheaper than light rail, at perhaps $15 million to $20 million a mile instead of $40 million, said UTA General Manager John Inglish, who traveled with the group. Streetcars pull up to curbs and don't need boarding platforms.

Seeing and experiencing the possibilities helped show the mayors of Salt Lake County, Bountiful and Ogden that the less-expensive option might be the best for their jurisdictions, Inglish said. Portland, Ore., has a successful streetcar system, but it uses older technology, he said.

"You don't have vision if you don't see it happening somewhere," Inglish said. "They were blown away."

Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon said the tour helped him see the importance of zoning areas to encourage higher-density developments around the rails, and that streetcars are low-impact vehicles that can coexist with pedestrians and even parks.

Corroon and the others rushed from one city to the next every day, occasionally stopping for a meal courtesy of local transit officials and suppliers. In Zurich, UTA's itinerary had them enjoying a "fondue tram," eating melted delights while riding a train through town.

Although a streetcar must compete with cars in traffic, it moves more people faster than buses can. A streetcar can stretch to carry 500 people if necessary, using just one operator, Inglish said.

Bordeaux, France, demonstrated a new technology that uses a third rail that is electrified only as the car passes over it, eliminating the risk of pedestrian electrocutions. Other trains on the tour packed batteries, allowing cities to dispense with overhead wires in places, such as city-center plazas. Those technologies proved persuasive to Ogden Mayor Matthew Godfrey, who said he doesn't want overhead wires in his city.

Manufacturers and European transit officials showed the delegation that the battery packs can power through snow, Godfrey said. "We got an assurance that the technology exists to do what we wanted to do in Ogden."

Bountiful Mayor Joe Johnson said he was so smitten that he not only dropped his opposition to a streetcar line from Salt Lake City but now prefers it to TRAX. He had worried about running the trains in traffic, but found that they're more accessible in neighborhoods, move faster than he had imagined (around 40 mph) and don't require light rail's broad path.

The delegates shuttled to seven cities in seven days. Inglish doubts any of them got more than six hours of sleep a night.

"This wasn't a vacation," Johnson said.

UTA invited Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker, but he declined. He said he didn't need to be sold on streetcars, although he believes the trip was valuable for those who took it.

About the trip
Who went » Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon; Ogden Mayor Matthew Godfrey; Bountiful Mayor Joe Johnson; Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce President Lane Beattie; UTA General Manager John Inglish; Assistant General Manager Mike Allegra; Board Chairman Larry Ellertson; board member Justin Allen; General Counsel Bruce Jones; Chief Communications Officer Andrea Packer; streetcar project manager Kerry Doane; and regional UTA directors Art Bowen and Lorin Simpson.

Where they went » Vienna, Austria; Munich, Germany; Zurich, Switzerland; Nice, France; Bordeaux, France; Monaco; and Paris.

What it cost » An estimated $3,724.50 per person.

What they saw » Trains that run on streets, like those that crisscrossed Salt Lake City in the early 20th century but faster, with modern electrical systems, batteries and in-ground electrified rails. The vehicles generally feed from neighborhoods into subway lines, the way UTA expects to connect Utahns to TRAX and FrontRunner.

How it translates » Officials say the trip helped them see how a streetcar web in Utah could coexist with traffic, carry more people than buses and avoid, in places, using overhead power lines.


..
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  #117  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2009, 2:39 PM
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Streetcars

Streetcar interior - Paris

Susan Decker

Boulevard Kellermann - Paris

by Meteorry

Paris

by Jc

Vienna

by MarS

The Ottakring Streecar - Vienna

by NeiTech

Quinconces BOD3137 - Bordeaux, France


by NeiTech

Munich

by Woodpeckar

Zurich

by lazytom

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  #118  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2009, 5:48 AM
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Southern Metro
[IMG][/IMG]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wasatch_One View Post
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/295849/17/

Thursday, 15 January 2009
Utah County FrontRunner commuter rail expansion on track
Print E-mail
Ace Stryker - Daily Herald


MARIO RUIZ/Daily Herald
Union Pacific and UTA crews unloaded 10 1660 foot steel rails in Lehi for the UTA Frontrunner rail system Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009. The third-of-a-mile long continuous welded rails weighing more than 31 tons were brought to Utah from a plant in Pueblo County, Colorado.


While recessionary concerns threaten to reduce or close government projects across the state, a planned commuter rail extension into Utah County is rolling along just fine.
"As far as budget cuts go, that is not an issue," said Carrie Bohnsack-Ware, spokeswoman for Utah Transit Authority, which is heading up the FrontRunner endeavor. "We are plowing ahead at full steam -- pun intended."

The FrontRunner South project will connect the new railway from its Salt Lake Central Station to an intermodal center at 600 South in Provo, with stops along the way in Orem, Vineyard, American Fork, Lehi, Draper, Sandy and Murray. It's part of UTA's $2.2 billion FrontLines 2015 program, a series of commuter and light rail projects funded by federal and local authorities. The expansion is well under way and could be open "if everything goes well" in 2012, said project manager Steve Meyer, though it's unclear what the final cost will be.

"There isn't an easy answer because of several factors," he said. "There are over 300 individual parcels of right-of-way that we're in the process of acquiring."

But it's more than that, Meyer said. Along the way, existing Union Pacific track must be moved, utility lines must be relocated, bridges must be built -- all of which depends on parties outside of UTA's control. He said it's a safe bet the final price tag will be significantly higher than FrontRunner North's, which topped $600 million for an equal length of track -- 44 miles -- between Salt Lake City and Ogden.

"That was good practice up north," said Meyer, who also managed the first half of the project. "This is the real deal."

The biggest difference between the two legs is the number of structures needed to make the southern route work, he said. The northern segment required just two bridges. The southern part looks to require at least 60 structures, including bridges, boxes and irrigation. Construction is already under way for a bridge over the American Fork River, and brush clearing and grading is being done at other spots along the future line.

"This year's going to be a big year for us to get a lot of work done," Meyer said. "We're dependent upon those third parties to get some of that work done to open up the corridor."

Utah County's FrontRunner stations will be positioned along the Interstate 15 corridor at high-population nexuses: Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, the new Main Street interchange in American Fork, the old Geneva site in Vineyard, west of Utah Valley University in Orem, and at University Avenue and 600 South in Provo. The Vineyard station won't open with the others, but will be added as the county continues to grow, Meyer said.

The Orem and Provo stations will be part of larger "intermodal centers" that will also offer commuters an option to finish their trips on special "bus rapid transit" lines. The buses are designed to move rapidly through city streets to popular stops such as Brigham Young University. It's all part of a larger plan to make it possible for county residents to leave their cars behind and be able to access faraway destinations -- like the Salt Lake International Airport, EnergySolutions Arena or the University of Utah -- using public transportation, said Gary McGinn, Provo's director of community development.

"That'll be a major link," he said. "Once we have that backbone of good, reliable bus rapid transit service in our city, then we can have more local bus service branching off that spine into other areas of our city."

McGinn said Provo's intermodal center is scheduled to open concurrently with FrontRunner South.

When FrontRunner opens, travel from Provo to Ogden -- the line's terminal points -- should take just under two hours, Meyer said. But it may not stop there: There are discussions about extending the line as far south as Nephi, with additional stops in Springville and Payson, and as far north as Brigham City. He said Springville has already picked a site, and Payson has created a transit-oriented zone in preparation for future expansion.

"That 120 miles encompasses about 80 percent of the state's population," Meyer said. "That'd be the spine of the Utah transportation corridor."

• Ace Stryker can be reached at astryker@heraldextra.com.
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  #119  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2009, 5:55 PM
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Originally Posted by arkhitektor View Post
I was playing around with some new graphics editing software last night and put together a map showing all of the UTA rail lines that are completed or currently under construction. In case you hadn't realized, were going to have a pretty awesome system in a few years:



I stylized it a bit and removed some of the turns that TRAX takes in the west part of downtown because showing the exact route got pretty jumbled. I am assuming that W. Valley and Mid-Jordan trains will continue all the way into downtown.

Compare that to what we had less than 10 years ago, and you can see that we're doing pretty well as far as developing a transit network goes:



Also, I saw this on KSL.com yesterday:

http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=5570660

The Mid-Jordan line is about a year ahead of schedule and will now open in mid-2011.
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Old Posted Feb 12, 2009, 7:34 PM
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electricron electricron is offline
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Lightbulb

Thanks for taking the time to make the map.
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