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  #221  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2010, 2:39 PM
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View - Western portion of Univ. of Utah Campus & East Bench of Salt Lake City



Forbes: Salt Lake City is the best commute in the nation.


ksl.com

By Marc Giauque

SALT LAKE CITY -- Drivers may agree or disagree, but Forbes magazine thinks Salt Lake City has the best commute in the country.

Forbes.com gave Salt Lake City high marks when it came to traffic delays, travel time and road congestion. It also said 2 in 10 commuters share their ride, in one form or another, with at least one more person.

Other high-ranking cities include Buffalo, New York and Rochester.

Forbes says Tampa, Fla.; Detroit, Mich.; and Atlanta, Ga., have the worst commutes.

Utah Department of Transportation executive director John Njord says, in part, it's recognition of UDOT's efforts to stay ahead of the growth curve, to work quickly and efficiently and to stay out of people's hair.

"We've recognized, as a department, that our projects impact people's lives," Njord says.

He says some of the things UDOT is doing, that planners think is helping, is looking at ways to do work on the roadways so they're not part of the mathematics involved in traffic delays.


Daily Grind
Best And Worst Cities For Commuters
Francesca Levy, 02.16.10, 06:00 AM EST
In these areas, urban sprawl and solo drivers are the difference between a hassle-free and a harrowing trek to work.


Commuter Rank Metropolitan Statistical Area
Travel Delay Rank- Green Commuter Ranking- Travel Time Rank
1 Salt Lake City, UT 26- 13- 11
2 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY 2 36 1
3 Rochester, NY 1 40 2
4 Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 14 33 5
5 Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY 8 32 10
5 Fresno, CA 14 23 16
7 Tulsa, OK 8 48 4
8 Pittsburgh, PA 5 14 40
8 Tucson, AZ 31 18 23
10 Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH 4 41 14
11 Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, OR-WA 38 8 31
12 Oklahoma City, OK 11 52 3
13 Albuquerque 22 28 22
14 Dayton, OH 5 54 6
14 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI 31 29 18
16 Las Vegas-Paradise, NV 42 22 20
17 Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT 11 46 12
18 Honolulu, HI 31 3 46
19 Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN 27 43 9
20 Kansas City, MO-KS 2 58 7
21 Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC 22 37 19
22 Richmond, VA 5 44 21
23 Memphis, TN-MS-AR 11 49 15
23 San Antonio, TX 29 27 28
25 New Haven-Milford, CT 10 34 32
25 Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN 22 47 13
27 Austin-Round Rock, TX 38 17 36
28 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 38 6 48
29 Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH 36 5 51
30 Columbus, OH 22 57 8
30 Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC 34 35 24
32 New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA 19 24 43
32 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 37 9 49
32 Denver-Aurora, CO 45 21 33
35 Raleigh-Cary, NC 19 45 26
36 Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ 42 16 44
36 Sacramento--Arden-Arcade--Roseville, CA 48 15 42
36 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 52 25 30
39 St. Louis, MO-IL 14 51 25
40 Jacksonville, FL 29 42 27
41 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 34 11 56
41 San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA 58 2 53
43 San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA 54 20 39
44 Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, RI-MA 19 39 38
44 Baltimore-Towson, MD 45 12 52
46 New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA 54 1 60
47 Indianapolis-Carmel, IN 28 59 17
48 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV 57 4 59
49 Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin, TN 17 55 29
50 Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, IL-IN-WI 59 7 57
51 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA 60 10 54
52 Birmingham-Hoover, AL 17 56 34
53 Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 50 26 50
54 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 52 19 58
55 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL 54 31 47
56 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 48 38 45
57 Orlando-Kissimmee, FL 42 50 37
58 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA 51 30 55
59 Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI 38 60 35
60 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 45 53 41

1 Source: Texas Transportation Institute.
2 Source: U.S. Census Bureau.
Full Story: Best And Worst Cities For Commuters


To find the cities with the best commutes, we measured travel time, road congestion and travel delays for the 60 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the U.S. Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we calculated what percentage of commuters in each metro area took an hour or more to get to work in each of these cities in 2008, the most recent year for which these data are kept. To find the areas with the fewest cars on the road, we next factored in the percentage of commuters who carpooled or used alternatives to driving like walking, biking or taking public transportation in 2008. We referred to this as the "green commuter" ranking. Finally, we looked at the Travel Time Index, a measure that the Texas Transportation Institute, a transportation research organization, uses to measure delays. The TTI indicates how long a commute takes during rush hour compared to the same trip in ideal conditions. A short commute is good, but a dependably short commute is even better. The most recent TTI data is from 2007, and was released in July 2009. We ranked the metros on each of those measures, and then averaged the rankings for the final score. We gave heavier weight to travel time and congestion measures, since many of the cities have minimal differences in TTI numbers


Forbes Magazine names SLC No. 1 for commuters
The Salt Lake Tribune


Updated: 02/19/2010 08:11:09 PM MST


Quit cursing that commute; it could be much worse.

Forbes magazine has named the Salt Lake City area the country's best for commuters, outpacing the 60 largest metro areas. The award was based on travel time, traffic delays and road congestion.

Of course, commuters stuck at rush hour on Interstate 15 or missing every traffic light on the way home on 400 South may differ.

The magazine credited Salt Lake City's commuting experience partly on the investment in transit. It also highlighted the 44 miles of car-pool lanes and the 20 percent of commuters who get to work by car-pooling, riding TRAX, walking, busing or biking.

"We are excited to be recognized nationally for our transportation vision," said Mayor Ralph Becker, "and continue to strive to improve options throughout the city."

The mayor's office notes the city now will tackle its non-synchronized traffic lights -- a source of frustration and running joke for residents. Through an energy efficiency and conservation block grant, the city will tap an independent consultant to review the city's traffic-signal timing and plot changes. Results of the report are expected in August.

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  #222  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2010, 4:00 AM
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The top 7 cities are relatively small. Should be no surprise that smaller metros have shorter commutes!
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  #223  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2010, 1:40 PM
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Remember SandSailor that the Salt Lake City area, "area as quoted, meaning it's adjoining communities," is over two and a quarter million people, and growing rapidly. While that certainly isn't L.A. or Chicago, it's by no means small, or a Fresno, Albany, or Tulsa either. But as you stated, very true regarding many of those cities numbered in the top 20 being smaller, both from a city proper standpoint, and as a greater metro. Many, which are in the top ten or twenty, are not nearly the size of SLC's combined metros.
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  #224  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2010, 8:21 PM
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But remember delts the study was conducted using Metropolitan Statistical Areas not Combined Satistical Areas. According to the Census Bureau, Salt Lakes MSA was 1,115,692 in 2008 - ranked #49. It was right behind Birmingham-Hoover and just ahead of Raleigh-Cary. So when comparing MSAs SandSailors comments are even more relevant.

The top ten:

1 Salt Lake City, UT 26- 13- 11 MSA rank #49
2 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY 2 36 1 MSA rank #47
3 Rochester, NY 1 40 2 MSA rank #51
4 Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 14 33 5 MSA rank #39
5 Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY 8 32 10 MSA rank #57
5 Fresno, CA 14 23 16 MSA rank #54
7 Tulsa, OK 8 48 4 MSA rank #53
8 Pittsburgh, PA 5 14 40 MSA rank #22
8 Tucson, AZ 31 18 23 MSA rank #52
10 Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH 4 41 14 MSA rank #26


Not exactly heavily populated areas. Minneapolis with an MSA rank of #16 is the largest city in the top 25 with the best commutes.
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  #225  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2010, 5:33 AM
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But another point is that Salt Lake's roads are actually feeding off of another million people above its MSA. I mean obviously not everyone commutes from the other metros but a large amount do as they're within close range.
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  #226  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2010, 5:44 AM
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Other transportation news:

FrontRunner South is now estimated 30% complete. This is the commuter rail that will connect Salt Lake City to the Provo MSA to the south.


http://www.utahurbanforum.com/frontr...ents-t232.html


Trax: Work continues on the Mid-Jordan line which is nearly complete, and 1 year ahead of schedule, as well as the West Valley line, and the Airport line is now under way.


Airport station rednering

http://www.utahurbanforum.com/uta-tr...s-t233-10.html
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  #227  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2010, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by TonyAnderson View Post
But another point is that Salt Lake's roads are actually feeding off of another million people above its MSA. I mean obviously not everyone commutes from the other metros but a large amount do as they're within close range.
And that's exactly the point Tony. As you and I both know, since we actually make the commute regularly. To compare Salt Lake City's greater metro commute to Buffalo/Niagra Falls, or Birminham/Hoover, etc. is hilarious and plain N/A. While I may officially reside in the Provo/Orem MSA of approx 600,000, I, along with tens of thousands of my fellow commuters, are much closer to downtown SLC than a large number of residents who are a part of the 1.1 million, who officially reside in the Salt Lake MSA. The same is applicable for the northern Ogden/Clearfield MSA. I, like many forumers am used to commutes throughout diverse MSA/CSA's. The Wasatch Front's greater CSA is comparitively a breeze commute to almost all Metros I've experienced regularly , including Denver's MSA/CSA or much smaller metros, such as Boise, and especially large sections of Portland's CSA. Perhaps, in some ways that's not a good thing, because it has a tendancy to encourage sprawl. Though, it would seem that the hurried buildup of TRAX and FrontRunner is adding to the desired density of Downtown SLC.

Last edited by delts145; Mar 14, 2010 at 12:24 PM.
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  #228  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2010, 6:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAnderson
But another point is that Salt Lake's roads are actually feeding off of another million people above its MSA. I mean obviously not everyone commutes from the other metros but a large amount do as they're within close range.
Your argument seems to be SLC is part of a greater CSA with a larger population and that is somehow relevant to the study. Apples to oranges. Nearly all of the cities on the list are part of a greater CSA with a larger population. In fact the difference in population between New Yorks CSA and MSA is much larger than the entire population of the state of Utah. In fact to compare commutes in an area with a CSA of 1.7 million (SLC) to one with 22 million (NYC) is suspect IMO. I would prefer comparing similar sized MSAs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
To compare Salt Lake City's greater metro commute to Buffalo/Niagra Falls, or Birminham/Hoover, etc. is hilarious and plain N/A.
I might agree with you however, that is exactly what this study portends to do. It compares the MSAs of SLC, Buffalo, Birmingham, NY, and 56 others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
While I may officially reside in the Provo/Orem MSA of approx 600,000, I, along with tens of thousands of my fellow commuters, are much closer to downtown SLC than a large number of residents who are a part of the 1.1 million, who officially reside in the Salt Lake MSA. The same is applicable for the northern Ogden/Clearfield MSA. I, like many forumers am used to commutes throughout diverse MSA/CSA's.
See explanation above. The study must use a baseline of some sort and therefore the comparison involving MSAs. They don't compare MSAs and CSAs for obvious reasons - apples to oranges. The bottom line is anyone commuting in the MSA is included in the study regardless of where they reside. The MSA merely defines a physical boundary - i.e. the study area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
The Wasatch Front's greater CSA is comparitively a breeze commute to almost all Metros I've experienced regularly , including Denver's MSA/CSA or much smaller metros, such as Boise, and especially large sections of Portland's CSA. Perhaps, in some ways that's not a good thing, because it has a tendancy to encourage sprawl. Though, it would seem that the hurried buildup of TRAX and FrontRunner is adding to the desired density of Downtown SLC.
Agreed - cities that are much less centralized (with less centralized employment in particular) such as Salt Lake tend to have better commutes. Nothing we've discussed refutes the observation that the top 25 cities in the study are smaller on average and therefore have better commutes. The MSA rankings show that clearly.

Last edited by CPVLIVE; Mar 16, 2010 at 5:42 PM.
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  #229  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2010, 12:10 PM
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The fact that you refer to Salt Lake's CSA as 1.7 million represents well your accuracy. Forget the periphery, Just the addition of the immediately adjoining Ogden/Clearfield and Provo/Orem put's you off by a few hundred thousand. So much for your typical agenda.

I'm well aware of the commutes of metros much smaller, relatively the same, and much larger, such as New York and L.A., because I have made them and continue to make them on a regular basis. Whether smaller, even to, or larger in size, I have yet to encounter a metro that has kept pace as well with it's traffic as the Wasatch Front, including Denver. This isn't the first time The Wasatch has been ranked among the best commutes. There is a reason for it, no matter what the size comparitive is. It simply takes less time to go from point A to point B along the Wasatch.
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  #230  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2010, 11:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
The fact that you refer to Salt Lake's CSA as 1.7 million represents well your accuracy. Forget the periphery, Just the addition of the immediately adjoining Ogden/Clearfield and Provo/Orem put's you off by a few hundred thousand. So much for your typical agenda.
Just because we disagree doesn't mean I have an agenda delts. For your information I pulled the 1.7 million figure off of the U.S. Census website. You'll have to take your 'accuracy' issue up with them I'm afraid. Column C is the CSA population for July, 1 2008. Notice SLC at 1,717,261 and NY at 22,154,752. You should realize by now delts that I don't embellish or simply make stuff up like you do. You apparantly don't know your MSAs from your CSAs from your RNAs from your USAs Again - Nothing we've discussed refutes the observation that the top 25 cities in the study are smaller on average and therefore have better commutes. And by the way - just because you claim to have done something (like make commutes everywhere) it doesn't mean it's true nor does it give you any more credibility.

Here is the link - educate yourself. Your interested in the one titled 'Annual Estimates of the Population of Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2008 (CBSA-EST2008-02)'.

http://www.census.gov/popest/metro/C...08-annual.html

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  #231  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2010, 4:15 AM
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LOUD NOISES!

Ok,

True, all MSA's are getting traffic from the extended area, the argument is that Salt Lake's extended area outside of its MSA is relatively large, percentage wise, in regards to commuting. Larger than most others. Though the CSA is 1.7million right now, Utah County isn't included in that, and it's the same approximate distance away from Salt Lake as the metro included in the current CSA. In fact, Utah County is adjacent to Salt Lake County. On top of that, I know many people who make that commute - it's very common. Including Utah County in the CSA is just inevitable in the future (perhaps this census). That will give the CSA around 2.3million and would place it 21st between Cincinnati and Charlotte when comparing CSAs.

Now I'm not just saying this because I live in the area, as I like many different areas, but I have to give credit where credit is due: Salt Lake is pretty well ahead of the curve in regards to transportation when considering its size. To have 6 light-rail lines and 80 miles of commuter rail (by 2012) with an MSA a little over a million is really impressive. There's already numerous street cars being planned after that.

Anyway, here's some actual news:

Salt Lake leaders unveiling major projects for bike transportation

By Aaron Falk

Deseret News
Published: Monday, April 5, 2010 3:02 p.m. MDT



SALT LAKE CITY


"Completing cycling-oriented projects in line with our vision for a highly bikeable capital city is a priority," Becker said. "Increasing the options for alternative transportation has always been a focus. … Even in these tough economic times, we remain committed to increasing awareness of bicycle/motorist safety while also completing funded projects in Salt Lake City to promote biking as a safe and desirable transportation alternative."

City officials promise a busy summer for bicycle projects.

A bicycle transit center will open at Salt Lake Central Station, providing storage space for 80 commuters' bicycles.

The northern section of the Jordan River Trail, which will connect Salt Lake and Davis counties, almost has been designed and should be completed in 2010.

After adding 38 miles of new bike lanes last year, city officials hope to add to that number. The city has funding for green lane markings and dedicated bike lanes downtown, including stretches of Main and North Temple.

"Whenever a street is being repaved, we're using that as an opportunity to add bike lanes," said Becka Roolf, the city's bicycle-pedestrian coordinator.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/7...l?s_cid=rss-30

Salt Lake Transportation
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  #232  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2010, 6:31 AM
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This thread exists to discuss ongoing passenger rail projects in the SLC area... Anyone who wants to argue about local population statistics needs to do so on PM, or in the appropriate part of this forum.
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  #233  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2010, 9:39 AM
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We were talking about commute time, which is related to the transportation options including rail. But I digress and have moved on.
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  #234  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 7:25 AM
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New Trax cars being tested on new Mid-Jordan line

Quote:
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Actually I already got a few shots.







conveniently located in the middle of nowhere..
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  #235  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2010, 2:36 PM
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Excellent points all Tony, but of course we're just uneducated liars. I mean, what would hundred's of thousands of people at the southern portion of the metro have to do with commute times at the metro's central portion...right? Maybe this is just a dream I'm having, and I actually don't live at the heart of all of this transportation construction between the two valleys. Or better yet, I made it all up. I actually live in L.A. full time, and just enjoy the fantasy of living near all of that incredible skiing along the Wasatch, LOL! Of course, forget that billions in transportation dollars are now being spent (not just talked about) between the central and southern metro areas, in order to accomodate the commute exchange between the two cores. It will continue to take a considerable effort to accomodate the commute times of the central and southern daily exchange of one of the nation's five fastest growing areas. The Southern metro alone will soon be over one million people. I guess we'll just have to wait until the 2010 Census comes out, and see if Utah Valley is actually included as an official part of the greater CSA. Hey, maybe the pasty bureaucrats will take even longer to wake up to reality?? They can continue to pretend for whatever reason, the two areas are not connected as one. Until then, if we can't find it on our monitors, it must not exist.
Thank goodness, the powers that be are doing a comparitively excellent job of keeping pace with the booming population. Not only with the ongoing expansion of the highway system, but especially the major efforts in actually building mass transit at such an accelerated pace, and not just giving it lip service.



Wasatch Front Metro - Muti-Billion dollar, 3-year transportation project moves into high gear.

UDOT wants public informed about Utah construction projects in works

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/7...-projects.html

...I-15 Core is one of about 25 major construction projects the Utah Department of Transportation discussed with the media at a news conference Monday afternoon. UDOT wants the public to "Know Where, Know Why," as the slogan goes for the 2010 construction information campaign...





Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAnderson View Post
Provo-Orem area projected to have largest growth nationwide

Heidi Toth - Daily Herald | Posted: Thursday, April 1, 2010 12:45 am

PROVO
-- People may complain about Utah's large families, but if CNN Money is right, that birth rate is going to be the biggest factor in getting Utah a fourth seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

CNN Money on Tuesday predicted that the Provo-Orem metropolis would grow by 47 percent from the last census 10 years ago, which is more growth than any other city in the nation. One big reason for the growth: for every death, more than six babies are born.

There's more to the story than that, said Mayor John Curtis; Provo consistently has high rankings for quality of life, health, recreational opportunities, safety and well-being. New people are moving here; people are having large families, and both new and old people are staying, which is how the city's population jumped.

Full: http://heraldextra.com/news/local/ce...b44ec08e3.html

Last edited by delts145; Apr 13, 2010 at 6:55 PM.
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  #236  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2010, 12:40 PM
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North Temple viaduct to close down


The Salt Lake Tribune
By Kathy McKitrick


The North Temple viaduct, a major connector between the core of Utah's capital city and points west, will close Sunday at 6 a.m. for an 18-month demolition and renovation.


This artist's rendering shows a rebuilt North Temple viaduct looking south toward The Gateway with FrontRunner going under the overpass and the airport TRAX line extending across the viaduct. The old viaduct's demolition starts Sunday, with total cost of the remake set at $71 million. Source: Utah Transit Authority

The $71 million rebuild is a key part of Utah Transit Authority's future light-rail TRAX line to Salt Lake City's International Airport. That project is projected to cost $350 million.

The current viaduct stretches from 300 West to 600 West and spans rail yards and tracks that are still in use by Union Pacific and UTA's FrontRunner commuter rail system. So dismantling must occur in segments when areas beneath are not in use. That process should take about eight weeks, said UTA spokesman Gerry Carpenter.

On Sunday, crews will start stripping off the asphalt and removing the light structures, Carpenter said. After that comes removal of the peripheral infrastructure.

"Because it's over an active rail line, they have to cut it out in segments," Carpenter said, noting that cranes will remove the steel and concrete, which will get recycled and reused.

UTA recommends that motorists use 400 South and 600 North as alternate routes to avoid potential delays at railroad crossings.

The new structure will descend at 400 West instead of 300 West, Carpenter said, with a built-in TRAX lane, security lighting, bike and pedestrian paths, and a transfer station where riders can switch between FrontRunner and TRAX.

..
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Old Posted Apr 21, 2010, 2:44 PM
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North Temple bridge demolition begins

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/7...on-begins.html

SALT LAKE CITY — Shortly after business and community leaders pleaded with the public Tuesday to continue to patronize North Temple businesses, construction crews began demolition of the street's iconic traffic bridge, limiting access to the city's west side for the next roughly 18 months...


Ryan Memmott, right, construction manager of the North Temple Light Rail TRAX expansion project, helps Salt Lake City mayor Ralph Becker use an excavator to demolish a concrete barrier on the North Temple viaduct during a press conference in Salt Lake City Tuesday to announce the beginning of the project. North Temple will be closed for 18 months during the construction. Keith Johnson, Deseret News


Excavators demolish a barrier on the North Temple bridge Tuesday. Drivers can use several other streets to go west. (Keith Johnson, Deseret News)



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Old Posted Apr 24, 2010, 1:06 PM
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Group wants to get West on fast track
S.L. Chamber hears report on creating high-speed rail lines

By Laura Hancock

Deseret News
Published: Thursday, April 22, 2010 8:46 p.m. MDT



SALT LAKE CITY — It's called Interstate II, the concept of high-speed railroad ribboning through the United States.

Millar and a handful of transportation experts spoke about high-speed rail at the Salt Lake Chamber's Transportation Committee meeting on Thursday. The Utah Transit Authority is a member of a network called the Western High Speed Rail Alliance, with transportation agencies in Reno, Las Vegas, Denver and Phoenix. The idea is that the Western cities will connect into the national network via Denver, and to the planned high-speed rail line that will connect northern and southern California by 2020 via Las Vegas and Reno.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/7...l?s_cid=rss-30

...
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  #239  
Old Posted May 13, 2010, 6:14 AM
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High-speed rail with those cities in mind may be a difficult task considering the geography of the mountain west.
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Old Posted May 13, 2010, 6:15 AM
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