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  #81  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 4:52 PM
YSL YSL is offline
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Gawd the sooner the better. Traffic, long commutes" the rat race, competitiveness, exorbitant cost of living etc. It''s gotten too much. After how light traffic has been, after how clean the air has been, I would absolutely love for them to pack up and move to Scottsdale or Plano or what ever area their little hearts desire! Farewell, have a great life.
I'm starting to feel this way as I get older and see what a cleaner, more civilized environment this pandemic has given us. My fascination with overpopulation seems to have gone. Bay Area would be lovely if it were only 3 million population.
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  #82  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 5:19 PM
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Facebook to Shift Permanently Toward More Remote Work After Coronavirus

https://www.wsj.com/articles/faceboo...us-11590081300

It's happening. It will be fascinating to see how this shift toward remote work will affect cities in the long run, especially the expensive ones.
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  #83  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 5:27 PM
Ant131531 Ant131531 is offline
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Originally Posted by dimondpark View Post
I hope not. I want this place to clear out. #byebyepeople
But then you wouldn't be able to peddle the Bay Area's statistics and achievements if the population dropped to 3 million.
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  #84  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 5:35 PM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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The Bay Area with 3 million people? That means that 6 million people would need to leave. Ain't happening unless a meteor hits San Jose.

Also, the widespread abandonment that this would cause would likely end up making the area a post apocalyptic hellscape, with bombed out houses/buildings becoming used for crime/drugs/ect.

If anything, if the Bay Area becomes cheaper it would likely attract more interest, since most of the country's population would kill to have a mild 12 month climate like the Bay Area has. Making the Bay Area cheaper will not slow population growth, it'll attract it.

In reality though, there might be a price correction but it will never be a ''cheap'' metro area and it's highly unlikely COVID19 will cause an evacuation en masse of population.
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  #85  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 6:05 PM
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But then you wouldn't be able to peddle the Bay Area's statistics and achievements if the population dropped to 3 million.
Meh we've built a $1 Trillion economy, created technology used by most human beings, championed causes and movements...Let Austin take over. Im over it.
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  #86  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 6:06 PM
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SF is overrated as hell. It's a nice small boutique city, but it's not New York City, London, Tokyo, Paris or even Amsterdam, yet it's more expensive than these cities. It's suburbs are no better or worse than suburbs practically anywhere in the country, yet the average home price is over a million dollars.
Couldn't agree more.
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  #87  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 6:14 PM
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
The Bay Area with 3 million people? That means that 6 million people would need to leave. Ain't happening unless a meteor hits San Jose.

Also, the widespread abandonment that this would cause would likely end up making the area a post apocalyptic hellscape, with bombed out houses/buildings becoming used for crime/drugs/ect.

If anything, if the Bay Area becomes cheaper it would likely attract more interest, since most of the country's population would kill to have a mild 12 month climate like the Bay Area has. Making the Bay Area cheaper will not slow population growth, it'll attract it.

In reality though, there might be a price correction but it will never be a ''cheap'' metro area and it's highly unlikely COVID19 will cause an evacuation en masse of population.
We could tear down entire exurban towns, put the debris on to barges and dump it out at sea. Then reforest and let nature reclaim those areas.

I would love to drive from Oakland to Sacramento and there be nothing between Vallejo and Davis except farmland and gas stations.

Or drive from Hayward to San Jose through farmland or forests

Sighs ..
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  #88  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 6:31 PM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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^^I think it sounds like you would benefit from a move to Mendocino, or something.
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  #89  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 6:35 PM
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^^I think it sounds like you would benefit from a move to Mendocino, or something.
Well no, I want urban but a lot less suburban sprawl.

In 1950 the 9-county Bay Area had 2.6 million people and SF was a vibrant urban city.
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  #90  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 6:57 PM
JAYNYC JAYNYC is offline
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Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
SF is overrated as hell. It's a nice small boutique city, but it's not New York City, London, Tokyo, Paris or even Amsterdam, yet it's more expensive than these cities. It's suburbs are no better or worse than suburbs practically anywhere in the country, yet the average home price is over a million dollars.
As someone who lived in the heart of San Francisco for four years, I couldn't agree with you more. Many residents of the city (and of the entire Bay Area) have a holier than thou attitude, believe it to be God's Country and scoff at the notion of living elsewhere.

It's in no way comparable to the significance, culture and energy of NYC, and not even on L.A.'s level, IMO.

It would behoove people out there to get off their high horse and get a grip.
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  #91  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 7:26 PM
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As someone who lived in the heart of San Francisco for four years, I couldn't agree with you more. Many residents of the city (and of the entire Bay Area) have a holier than thou attitude, believe it to be God's Country and scoff at the notion of living elsewhere.
So what? Get over it.
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  #92  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 7:49 PM
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Zuckerberg says employees moving out of Silicon Valley may face pay cuts

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Zuckerberg made his prediction on his weekly live stream with employees, telling them that this decision should help the company improve its employee retention, and it will allow Facebook to hire from talent pools that previously wouldn’t consider moving to big cities to work for the company. Additionally, this decision will allow Facebook to improve the diversity of its workforce and spread economic opportunity across more places.

We’ll adjust salary to your location at that point,” said Zuckerberg, citing that this is necessary for taxes and accounting. “There’ll be severe ramifications for people who are not honest about this.”

Zuckerberg made his prediction on his weekly live stream with employees, telling them that this decision should help the company improve its employee retention, and it will allow Facebook to hire from talent pools that previously wouldn’t consider moving to big cities to work for the company. Additionally, this decision will allow Facebook to improve the diversity of its workforce and spread economic opportunity across more places.

Zuckerberg announced that Facebook is going to “aggressively” ramp up its hiring of remote workers, and the company is going to take a “measured approach” to opening up permanent remote work positions for existing employees.

“When you limit hiring to people who either live in a small number of big cities or are willing to move there, that cuts out a lot of people who live in different communities, different backgrounds or may have different perspectives,” Zuckerberg said

Currently, 95% of Facebook’s employees are working remotely, Zuckerberg said. A survey conducted by Facebook found that 50% of employees said they were as productive working from home as they were at the office, Zuckerberg said. Among Facebook employees, 40% said they were extremely, very or somewhat interested in full-time remote work, and among that subset of employees, 75% said they were either pretty confident or they might move to a different city if they could work remotely, Zuckerberg said.

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/21/zuck...-remotely.html
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  #93  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 7:56 PM
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Originally Posted by YSL View Post
Zuckerberg says employees moving out of Silicon Valley may face pay cuts



https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/21/zuck...-remotely.html
I'd totally work for FB working from home. I'd get paid less here in Houston but time is money and would be worth it not having to commute anywhere (in either city)
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  #94  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 7:56 PM
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So what? Get over it.
Aww. Strike a nerve?
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  #95  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 8:12 PM
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Bay Area and New Yorkers have the most holier than thou attitude that I’ve noticed from transplants into Austin. New Yorkers are probably the most insufferable since they have the constant need to compare NYC to everything.
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  #96  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 8:18 PM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is offline
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I work for a Tech company and we're highly considering going remote as well, shuddering our three level office in FiDi NYC. It would save the company hundreds of thousands a year, which is going to go directly back into the pockets of a select few and unlikely to show at all in employee paychecks.

I prefer working from home as of late, not having to pile into the subway like a sardine, ect. I do think that we're starting to see something strange though and I think it might change the energy of some cities. I think New York is going to end up losing a lot of it's office jobs in town and the suburbs/other cities will start seeing an uptick in New Yorkers. Same could be said for SF and any high cost city.

It won't destroy the cities, but cities will likely skew more blue collar/essential worker filled rather than big earners who don't need to go outside to earn a living anymore.
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  #97  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 8:24 PM
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Bay Area and New Yorkers have the most holier than thou attitude that I’ve noticed from transplants into Austin. New Yorkers are probably the most insufferable since they have the constant need to compare NYC to everything.
That's what happens a lot when you live in cities hyped/iconic/very entrenched in pop culture/constantly referred to as cool and important.. and you think the coolness rub onto you by proxy.

I lived in NY for 4 years then moved back to Houston and did that insufferable NY thing where I would name drop it every chance I get, look down at everyone in Houston as pathetic heathens because I previously lived in Manhattan's West Village. I then moved to SF for work then came to Austin with a similar elitist attitude.

I feel most of those insufferable transplants aren't even originally from NY or SF either.
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  #98  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 8:25 PM
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Bay Area and New Yorkers have the most holier than thou attitude that I’ve noticed from transplants into Austin. New Yorkers are probably the most insufferable since they have the constant need to compare NYC to everything.
New Yorkers never used to be like that. They were loud, brash and rough around the edges but never really uppity or thought they were anyone special. It's people who moved to New York and then moved elsewhere that give NY a bad rap. Upstate is now more what like what Downstate used to be before hipsters and yuppies discovered Brooklyn and Harlem.../rant
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  #99  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 8:26 PM
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So for all of these jobs that can suddenly be done remotely... Why will any of them have to be done from the U.S. at all in the future?
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  #100  
Old Posted May 21, 2020, 8:26 PM
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Originally Posted by TexasPlaya View Post
Bay Area and New Yorkers have the most holier than thou attitude that I’ve noticed from transplants into Austin. New Yorkers are probably the most insufferable since they have the constant need to compare NYC to everything.
Lived in Austin for 4+ years. Left and never looked back.

Was a decent medium-sized city with a bit of flavor back then, overrated doesn't begin to describe it today.
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