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  #42301  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 3:24 PM
Rustifer Rustifer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I've never heard of a Laugh-In restaurant Martin, but I noticed Lums is mentioned.


http://www.kevmania.com/remembering-lums/

Lums was one one of my favorite places to eat when I was a kid. Roast Beef sandwiches and the best seasoned fries.
Lum's offered "hot dogs steamed in beer". As a 16 year old in Indianapolis, that was about as close to public drinking as I could get. If one could eat 4 or 5 hot dogs, would you get drunk? It was also a great date place, as you could get a meal of hot dogs, fries and a coke for under $3 and still afford the drive-in movie afterwards. Ah, those were the days!
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  #42302  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 5:27 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Help.

Who are these people? Is that Susan Hayward in the white sandals with her hand on this guy's shoulder? I don't recognize anyone else (assuming I've 'recognized' Hayward). Captioned as Santa Monica Pier 1949


Santa Monica Pier by Santa Monica Pier, on Flickr
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  #42303  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 6:17 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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The Santa Monica Pier History site has your photo on it, but no information as to whom all the people are or where the photo came from.
They date the Yacht Harbor sign to 1941, but the photo itself isn't actually dated.

I found this photo, that has the same ladies in question, on the Huntington Digital Library site:

Huntington Digital Library

They have it dated as "not before 1940." Like the Santa Monica Pier History page, they also do not label any of the people in the photo.
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  #42304  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 6:32 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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One's left to assume that the men in the picture are the members of the "Pier's business community" who were responsible for erecting the sign. The young ladies added to dress up the photo op:


santamonicapier
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  #42305  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 6:33 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
Just searched the L.A. Times for Laugh-In Restaurant, with no pertinent result. Most interesting--but unrelated--thing I found was an ad of November 29, 1970, for an event to be held New Year's Eve at Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, and called Jewish Laugh-In, a.k.a. "The Farfel Follies," "Direct from New York." The ad avers that "You'll plotz with laughter." Later ads reword it to "'English-Yiddish' Laugh-In," but still insist that you'll plotz with laughter. I couldn't find a review, so we'll alas never know whether, when push came to shove, anyone indeed did plotz with laughter.
Thanks for looking, and your post made me plotz with laughter!
(I looked it up in my Funk & Wagnalls.)

I haven't found any evidence of one of these places in Los Angeles, but I found a blog post talking about this restaurant (and a Johnny Carson one called "Here's Johnny's") that said these Laugh-In restaurant locations were primarily in Michigan and Florida and the Laugh-In restaurants were owned by Chivers, the same company that launched Lum's. You'd have thought someone would have at least put one in Beautiful Downtown Burbank.
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  #42306  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 7:00 PM
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We've got a bank building from Julius Shulman today. It's "Job 4068: Kurt Meyer, Liberty Savings and Loan Association, 1966, 1967".



A straight-on view of the front.



The last shot is a more arty angle looking up the side.



All from Getty Research Institute

Liberty Savings and Loan was at 1180 S Beverly Drive. More recently it's been Citibank, although the 2017 GSV images show the signage removed and banners with leasing details. From laconservancy.org:
After it was built, some tenants pushed to have the building painted dark brown so it would look more "finished." [Kurt] Meyer publicly protested this step, and the bank remained its simple, and quite effective, Brutalist self.

Today, some consider it among the finest examples of the style in Los Angeles.

GSV
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  #42307  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 7:37 PM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
We've got a bank building from Julius Shulman today. It's "Job 4068: Kurt Meyer, Liberty Savings and Loan Association, 1966, 1967".


GSV
Here are some pics of Los Angeles Brutalist buildings.
https://www.laconservancy.org/archit...tyle/brutalist

These ugly buildings often cause people who work in them or even look at them to suffer health problems. Conditions such as depression, loneliness, anxiety and mood swings are common.

If you're having a bad noirish day, don't get near one of these creepy, ominous concrete asylums. Right now, I think I'll watch some videos about puppies.
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  #42308  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 7:49 PM
Ed Workman Ed Workman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Here are some pics of Los Angeles Brutalist buildings.
https://www.laconservancy.org/archit...tyle/brutalist

These ugly buildings often cause people who work in them or even look at them to suffer health problems. Conditions such as depression, loneliness, anxiety and mood swings are common.

If you're having a bad noirish day, don't get near one of these creepy, ominous concrete edifices. Right now, I think I'll watch some videos about puppies.
The Liberty is one of the very few IMO that has survived the trendy. I Like it, even tho' it is an homage/knock-off of the Architecture School Bldg at Yale. Who did that one, Johnson?
Citation for illnesses these buildings- well the other ones on the linked site, not THIS one-?
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  #42309  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 8:12 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Paul Rudolph.

Rudolph Hall at Yale is beautiful and a joy to be in.


archdaily

(When it comes to architecture, it's not the style, it whether it's any good or not)

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 5, 2017 at 8:39 PM. Reason: add image
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  #42310  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 8:29 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Here are some pics of Los Angeles Brutalist buildings.
https://www.laconservancy.org/archit...tyle/brutalist
The only one I can remotely deal with on that list is the Sunkist Bldg. and maybe that's because the name reminds me of citrus fruit.

To quote a line from Mommie Dearest about that architectural style: "I am not one of your fans!
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  #42311  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 10:12 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
The USC caption is incorrect, e_r. The Sunset Lime Co. building in your photo is at 440 S. San Pedro Street.
Thanks so much Flyingwedge. Your post was a master class in sleuthing. (especially about the 1888 fire and how a portion of the bldg. survived)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge
ex-LA Police Chief John Skinner at the
"old San Pedro [sic] + Independence Depot at 5th and San Pedro":


Seaver Center
I especially liked this photograph FW. I had a difficult time finding any more information on John Skinner.

here's a pic from lapd_online


And that he attended one of the first LAPD baseball games.

"On June 11, 1887, the Los Angeles Police Department’s baseball team (The Police Nine) played a game of ball
against the Town’s Sheriff Department’s baseball team (The Constable Nines) at Sixth Street grounds in Los Angeles.
The Police Nine vs. The Constable Nine rivalry brought out a huge crowd, including Los Angeles Police Chief
John K. Skinner, and other City officials. The game raised $244.95 for Mrs. Watson's Home for Stray Girls."


I checked the city directories for a Mrs. Watson's Home for Stray Girls.
but all I found were several widows (named Watson) that might possibly have been the place.

here's an example:

lapl

I have to say that the use of the term 'stray girls' was rather unfortunate (it made me think of stray dogs )

In Illinois we had schools for 'wayward' girls. There was one out in the country near my hometown.
By the time I came along, the school was long closed but the big old scary building still stood.
We were always told it was where rich people in Chicago sent their daughters if they became pregnant
before marriage.

(of course Mrs. Watson might have simply meant run-away girls)

I digress.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 5, 2017 at 11:04 PM.
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  #42312  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 10:21 PM
riichkay riichkay is offline
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No i.d. on this photo, doesn't indicate L.A., or the name of the film/actors....but the real estate sign likely reads out Thomas C. Bundy (1881-1945), tennis champ and later real estate tycoon who developed the Miracle Mile and Sherman Oaks...there's an imprint in the sidewalk to the right of the policeman's shoe, I can't make it out.
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  #42313  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 10:42 PM
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The imprint says "J N Pattillo & Co, Contractors".


Distorted detail of image posted by riichkay

Here's an advert from the 1909 CD.


LAPL
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  #42314  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2017, 10:49 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riichkay View Post
The real estate sign likely reads out Thomas C. Bundy (1881-1945), tennis champ and later real estate tycoon.


Thomas Bundy at the U.S. National championship [no date]


Library of Congress / wiki

I don't know the location of this photo.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 6, 2017 at 1:23 AM.
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  #42315  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 12:08 AM
DViator DViator is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
These ugly buildings often cause people who work in them or even look at them to suffer health problems. Conditions such as depression, loneliness, anxiety and mood swings are common.
That was brutal.

Admittedly, Brutalism isn't for everyone (it happens to be one of my favorite styles), but the health problems you mentioned are going to be caused by a variety of factors, not just the building. Here's an interesting article from The Guardian that touches on it:

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2...ety-depression
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  #42316  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 1:43 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Here's an amazing view of Santa Monica Canyon in 1915.


Just found at http://www.ebay.com/itm/1915-Santa-M...EAAOSw-3FZKzpr

I believe the diagonal road is now Ocean Way.

__

asking $99.99 (on ebay)

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jun 6, 2017 at 1:57 AM.
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  #42317  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 3:16 AM
Mstimc Mstimc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
These ugly buildings often cause people who work in them or even look at them to suffer health problems. Conditions such as depression, loneliness, anxiety and mood swings are common.

If you're having a bad noirish day, don't get near one of these creepy, ominous concrete asylums. Right now, I think I'll watch some videos about puppies.
Agreed. Without getting too political, I think there's a reason 20th century fascist governments gravitated to this style. Its oppressive just to look at, and tends to suck the human element out of a building. Plus, unfinished concrete does not do well in any climate, and the stains and discoloration just add the overall depressing appearance. Brutalism is the perfect description for a lot of reasons.
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Tim C
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  #42318  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 3:33 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DViator View Post
That was brutal.

Here's an interesting article from The Guardian that touches on it:

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2...ety-depression
That was a good article. The main example they used, the Barbican, was a bad joke when it opened. Now, everyone loves it. My sister-in-law and her husband are on the waiting list to get a retirement flat there.
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  #42319  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 3:49 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Here's an amazing view of Santa Monica Canyon in 1915.


Just found at http://www.ebay.com/itm/1915-Santa-M...EAAOSw-3FZKzpr

I believe the diagonal road is now Ocean Way.
The three houses at the top, left to right, are 144 (The Bishop Conaty House, 1907,
where Mary Miles Minter died
), 142, 1910 (designed & built by Milwaukee Building Company/ Meyer & Holler) and 130, 1907 (designed by Robert Farquar & lived in by Roy Jones
and Ramon Navarro
), Adelaide Dr:


gsv

The diagonal is, as you said, the Ocean Ave Extension, and then Mabery:

google maps

236 Mabery Road was built in 1913, so I assume that's the lower house in the photo.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 6, 2017 at 5:53 AM. Reason: image
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  #42320  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2017, 4:54 AM
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Los Angeles and Independence Railroad Depot

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Thanks so much Flyingwedge. Your post was a master class in sleuthing. (especially about the 1888 fire and how a portion of the bldg. survived)

__
Thanks so much e_r. Sometimes the puzzle pieces all fit together.

Thanks too to t2 for locating a photo of the old LAIRR Depot with the correctly shaped doors:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
I could only find photos of the depot when the doors looked like this:



"Los Angeles and Independence Railroad Depot, San Pedro Street near Wolfskill Lane" (1877) @ CA St. Library


Have you ever wondered what the view was in 1877 from the north window of the depot's south tower? Perhaps not.

In any event, you'd look north up San Pedro St. To the left of the red dot you'd see the San Pedro Street palms; under
the green dot is the cupolaed Woodworth home (by Kysor and Mathews); on the far hilltop, next to the yellow dot . . .
I'm not sure what that is (Mary Banning house? Horticultural Pavilion?), but under the yellow dot is the tower of the
Temple Clocktower Court House. Can anyone pick out any other landmarks?:



487219 @ Huntington Digital Library


This may have been taken from the same window as the previous photo; this looks a bit more to the west, and the house
cut off at the right edge below is the same one cut off at the left edge above. The obvious landmark is St. Vibiana's, just
below 2nd Street. To the left of St. Vibiana's, there's a fence enclosing some hillside property below a house; those are
the home and yard of Mrs. Shepherd, on the north side of 1st, between Hill and Olive:



“View from the Santa Monica Depot, Los Angeles” (1877) @ CA St. Library
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