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  #22961  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post

Santa Monica Blvd and Fairfax (Undated)
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics03/00011388.jpg
Quote:
Originally Posted by loyalton View Post

Ashes of Vengeance starring Norma Talmadge is being advertised. IMDb says it was released in August 1923, so this likely dates from that or perhaps a bit later. Unless it's a midnight revival at the Roxy ...

Hmm. Are those Christmas decorations on the pole at lower left?
There's a Sam Seelig store on the right. These were renamed Safeway in 1925, so that puts an upper boundary on possible dates.
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  #22962  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 2:43 PM
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Whoa, good eye HossC on noticing that Sam Seelig store.

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Originally Posted by HossC View Post
For e_r, here's a better picture of the Formay smokestack. It's part of a set of five photos called "View of refinery exteriors, Southern California, 1934". The letters appear to have neon tubes, so it must've lit up at night.


USC Digital Library
I never expected to see such an excellent photograph of the Formay smokestack HossC.
Isn't it unusual for a smokestack to be lit with neon? It must have looked great in the night sky.

(that's some ominous looking black smoke..makes me wonder what ingredients are in Formay) Tires?

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Aug 2, 2014 at 9:39 PM.
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  #22963  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 3:20 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Originally Posted by loyalton View Post

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.0906...pPjFoVYS5w!2e0
Google Maps

This is Western and Santa Monica! In both old and new, we're looking north, along Western. There's the Security bank building in pretty good shape. Plus the Be-Hannesey business is in the 1923 and 1926 city directories at 1122 N. Western.

Thanks for the correction. Post has been amended. Address ID obtained from Source. Although I had my suspicions, the Source tends to be accurate more often than not. The primary focus was on the street tracks and overhead electrification. A few prior posts made observations concerning what appeared to be an absence of graffiti. With all of those overhead wires and shoes with laces, I still wonder if "shoefiti" is also a relatively new (post War) phenomenon? Disposable sneakers/running shoes?

http://sowooisnevertoofar.files.word...pg?w=300&h=191
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  #22964  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 3:27 PM
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-remember this from a few weeks ago?

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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
1960

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=64292

View of the ravine behind Lincoln High School which the city plans to use as a dump.
School Principal says "more space for an athletic facility is needed rather than a dump which would eliminate
our cross-country course (white arrows)."
These color slides from the 1960s of the Lincoln High School track offer a glimpse towards the area of the proposed dump.
ebay




ebay



ebay
_______



I'll add this view of the quad as well. (notice the light blue car parked in front of the building in the background. That's quite an elevation change)
ebay

If you like these I have more.

__
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  #22965  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 4:05 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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How do other members feel about the size of these panoramas? I'm aiming for a maximum of 4000px wide because I feel it gives a good trade-off between image detail and loading time.



Panoramic view of the Huntington residence and San Marino ranch, circa 1915.
NB. I grayscaled this one before reapplying the sepia tone. Hopefully it's more even now.


Huntington Digital Library
HossC: superb job! Loading time is a relative term. Whether it is regular maintenance, a change in the weather, or server-low battery level, this site and other repositories seem to have their "moments" of slow or non-existent loading. "Here tell" that things will improve. Consequently, speaking only for myself, I would vote for the highest resolution available from the source. Obviously, each of has our own "smart phone" limitations.


Another view of the Huntington cottage, now with a library, which some sources suggest was constructed post 1920. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Library In this instance, "the" source, Huntington, provides date, circa 1918. http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single.../id/107/rec/40


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  #22966  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 4:09 PM
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Billboard Refrigerator Cars

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Originally Posted by HossC View Post

And for Earl Boebert and Wig-Wag, here's another Swift refrigerator car. This one's got a "Carload of Swift's Brookfield mayonnaise for Peninsula Stores".


USC Digital Library

Just be careful your interest in refrigerator cars doesn't go too far - it could end in ...


ziffdavisinternational.com from L.A. Noire.
Nice follow-up to your original post, HossC. Straying a bit into the world of 'Reefer Madness", the Swift car is an example of what was once known as a "Billboard Reefer".

"The practice of painting advertisements on the freight cars of shippers and car owners dates well back into the 19th century. But in the 1920s, leasing companies realized they could contract with shippers to pass back usage payments beyond some agreed minimum.

This led to an explosion of car leasing and, as this book amply demonstrates, a corresponding explosion of billboard decoration of refrigerator cars. Railroad objections, especially to the usage payment rebates, led to hearings before the Interstate Commerce Commission, which, taking effect in 1937, banned most of the leasing practices which had generated the car leasing bonanza. After World War II, a restrained billboard style made a modest comeback.
Car-side advertising was only a detail of that ICC decision. But because it was the basis for a remarkable diversity of refrigerator car paint schemes in the era, the photographs of these cars have long held an interest for historians, railfans, and model railroaders." - From: Billboard Refrigerator Cars by Richard H. Hendrickson and Edward S. Kaminski, Signature Press, August 1, 2008.

Swift reefers were typically painted white with red lettering or Yello-orange with red lettering. This one looks to be white.

Cheers,
Jack

Last edited by Wig-Wag; Aug 2, 2014 at 7:17 PM.
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  #22967  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 4:52 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Republic Studios, Studio City, Los Angeles. 1942.


Huntington Digital Library

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...c_Pictures.jpg


Love the detail. Anyone parched? Harry Carroll's "Tin Pan Alley Cafe?" Within stumbling distance from the studio. (Have no idea if Harry's place had a liquor license.) Expect there was an upright piano nearby?

Harry produced more than just sandwiches.
http://i.ytimg.com/vi/8aYRXzCEYZA/0.jpghttp://www.library.yale.edu/musiclib...r_largejpg.jpg



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  #22968  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 5:35 PM
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The Beverly Hills Hotel addition, 1950.


http://marinachetner.files.wordpress...elexterior.jpg

The best part of this photograph are the parked cars. They're pretty snazzy looking.

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  #22969  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 9:10 PM
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Colegrove Memories

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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
Santa Monica Blvd and Western (Late '20s?)
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics03/00011388.jpg
I love this picture! I worked at that bank in 1982 and 1983, and it was a memorable experience. We used to get more noteworthy people in there than any other branch I worked at. Billy Barty did all his banking there, as did Ed Ruscha (although Ruscha had a guy who did his banking for him). Paul Rodriguez came in from time to time as well.

It was Security Pacific National Bank when I worked there, but we had equipment that still said "Security Trust & Savings Bank" on it, and I once found in the supply room a box of 100 pen nibs! I guess pen nibs could be noir. . . okay, no.

We had a lot of elderly customers who had been there for decades. I got a real taste of the old Hollywood from talking to them.
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  #22970  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 9:16 PM
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  #22971  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 10:31 PM
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I didn't recognize the location, but it looks like a dry cleaners. In the 1956 CD there's an entry for 'George's House of Dry Cleaning' at 8887 W Pico Boulevard. The building currently at that address looks consistent, and is still a cleaners. In place of the plain window on the right, there's now a nail store, but there's no business listed at 8885 W Pico in the 1956 CD, so I'm guessing it was all part of George's House of Dry Cleaning back then.


GSV

I tried to confirm the location by identifying the building in the background. If I'm right about the address, then in 1956 it was still the Citizens National Trust and Savings Bank Pico & Swall Drive branch at 8901 W Pico Boulevard. The 1928 picture below is from my round-up of Citizens Bank branches (full post here), but I'm not sure if it's the same building after a makeover. The building has since been replaced by a much more modern branch of Wells Fargo Bank.


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  #22972  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 11:34 PM
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Bright colors....no more.

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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Wasn't the era of Kodachrome great? Sadly that era is over.
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  #22973  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2014, 11:36 PM
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You da man HossC.
I searched and was unable to come up with the location.

I have to agree CBD...those colors are eye-popping.
Anyone notice the number 16776 on the bench? Were all of L.A.'s bus-stop benches numbered like this?

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Aug 3, 2014 at 3:47 PM.
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  #22974  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 1:34 AM
Pdxrailtransit Pdxrailtransit is offline
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Billboard Freight Cars

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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Thanks for figuring out the FORMAY question Retired_In_Texas and HossC.

Loyalton was also on the right track. He sent me this PM earlier.

This is what he wrote:

________________________________________________________________________________


Here's the photograph in question one last time.

ebay
Just a clarification; yes billboard adverstising was outlawed, but this applied only to railroad owned cars. Privately owned cars, like Swift's fleet (with reporting marks ending in "X") were exempt.

Last edited by Pdxrailtransit; Aug 3, 2014 at 1:35 AM. Reason: mispelling
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  #22975  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 4:48 AM
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Just a clarification; yes billboard advertising was outlawed, but this applied only to railroad owned cars. Privately owned cars, like Swift's fleet (with reporting marks ending in "X") were exempt.
Exactly. It looks like the rule about reporting marks ending in "X" for private cars must be a relatively newer one. See the shots of single reefers with the advertising banners.

And I correct myself on the reefers in the overhead shot. I can see now they are lettered "SWIFT" on their sides, just in a different style from the single car pictures added by Hoss C. All's well.
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  #22976  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 5:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
At the risk of going too far off the beaten path, I have a couple of questions concerning LA’s electric street cars. Did LA ever try an electrified “third rail” system, and/or was all electrification accomplished by means of overhead wiring?
Back in the day, there was probably no third rail in the county. Third rail was/is pretty rare in California with the Northern Electric Railway and Central California Traction in the Central Valley using it in years past. Today, NorCal's BART is third rail and so is LA's Metro Red Line.

Quote:
Tying the questions closer to the noirish LA subject matter, with all of the electricity above the miles of street car tracks, have there been any NLA postings concerning the potentially tragic consequences of humanity contacting those live wires or other portions of street car live electrical apparatus? I would guess it was not a popular subject for the public utilities, but even today, downed electrical power lines still seem to make the news.
In a noirish LA context, there are probably far more car vs. train accident photos around than railroad-related electrocution ones.
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  #22977  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 5:49 AM
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Labor Dispute

Here is a (very) minor puzzle.

'
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/viewItem.do?ark=21198/zz0027xpz7

The only information associated with this photo is a date, 1937, and a caption: "Crowd of Workers Gathered for a Strike." I wondered if it were possible to figure out what strike it was?

The photo comes from UCLA's digital collection of newspaper photographs from the Los Angeles Daily News.
[The Daily News, no relation to today's SFV-based Daily News, was founded by Cornelius Vanderbilt IV in 1923. After an early bankruptcy, it was acquired by newspaperman Manchester Boddy and operated as a moderately pro-labor and pro-Democratic paper in a media environment dominated by the far right-wing Times and Examiner. It continued until 1954 when ironically it was acquired by the Chandler interests and merged into their tabloid Los Angeles Mirror.]
In the foreground we see an ambulance (?) occupied by an attendant and what might be a customer loaded in feet-first. There are three policemen and an all-male crowd of workers who don't exactly look like they have white-collar jobs. An apparent gasometer looms in the background, and a few names of businesses are visible: "Commercial Super Service Associated," "Tarps-Rope[-ated?]," and furthest, "Newman Bros."

The 1938 city directory shows:


lapl

and a Sanborn map:


lapl

...confirms the presence of a gasometer at the SE corner of Alameda and E. 7th.

So it seems we're looking east on E. 7th street towards Alameda from Central, although I could be fooled by the perspective. At the SE corner of E. 7th and Central is the Los Angeles Union [Wholesale] Terminal Market (mentioned back on page 747 in the thread), which would be a plausible locus for labor disturbances.

The closest thing to a vegetable workers' dispute I could find in the Los Angeles Times was this from April 18, 1937:



The next time I'm at the Central Library, maybe I'll take a look at the microfilm and see if the Daily News ran the photo...(well I did say it was a minor puzzle )

Last edited by Lorendoc; Aug 3, 2014 at 6:47 AM.
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  #22978  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 6:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
You da man HossC.
I searched and was unable to come up with the location.

I have to agree CBD...those colors are eye-popping.
Anyone notice the number 16776 on the bench? Were all of L.A.'s bus-stop benches numbered like this?

__
Certainly through the 1970s and IIRC only on that side of each bench.

Very meta, with a photo of a photographer taking a photo of a camera shop ad. And the model appears to be holding the camera bag.
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  #22979  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorendoc View Post

Here is a (very) minor puzzle.

'
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/viewItem.do?ark=21198/zz0027xpz7

The only information associated with this photo is a date, 1937, and a caption: "Crowd of Workers Gathered for a Strike." I wondered if it were possible to figure out what strike it was?

...

So it seems we're looking east on E. 7th street towards Alameda from Central, although I could be fooled by the perspective. At the SE corner of E. 7th and Central is the Los Angeles Union [Wholesale] Terminal Market (mentioned back on page 747 in the thread), which would be a plausible locus for labor disturbances.
I think you're spot on with the location, Lorendoc. It looks like the picture was taken by the warehouse nearest the market on E 7th Street. Here's a current view showing the doorway from the picture above.


GSV

A smaller version of the aerial below has previously been posted by e_r. It shows the warehouses on E 7th and the gasometer on Alameda circa 1930-1935.


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  #22980  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2014, 4:37 PM
Lwize Lwize is offline
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Aren't those the old Nabisco buildings?

Maybe there was a strike at Nabisco.

Or not.
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