HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum

Since 1999, the SkyscraperPage Forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web. The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics. Welcome!

You are currently browsing as a guest. Register with the SkyscraperPage Forum and join this growing community of skyscraper enthusiasts. Registering has benefits such as fewer ads, the ability to post messages, private messaging and more.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Europe

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #361  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2014, 11:32 AM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 723
The German statistical office has also published the country's detailed population figures as of Jan. 1, 2014.

On January 1, 2014, the population of Germany was 80,767,463. The population of Germany grew by +243,800 people (+0.30%) in 2013, thanks to very high immigration. Super low fertility means the population is aging fast though.

Population less than 20 y/o on Jan. 1, 2014:
- France: 16,192,070 (French citizens: 15,398,658)
- UK: 15,192,650 (on July 1, 2013)
- Germany: 14,636,440 (German citizens: 13,664,669)
- Italy: 11,310,660 (Italian citizens: 10,124,273)
- Spain: 9,206,815 (Spanish citizens: 8,288,936)

Women between the ages of 20 and 40:
- Germany: 10,031,348 (German citizens: 8,570,577)
- UK: 8,904,939 (on July 1, 2013)
- France: 8,526,880 (French citizens: 7,808,914)
- Italy: 7,685,833 (Italian citizens: 6,586,273)
- Spain: 6,603,937 (Spanish citizens: 5,543,508)

We can see that France, despite having less women between the ages of 20 and 40 than Germany and the UK, manages to have more births than these two countries. The comparison between the population under 20 y/o of Italy and the UK is also pretty enlightening.
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #362  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2014, 8:05 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 9,319
Germany is getting crazy high immigration right now.

But this is a temporary stopgap. There won't always be such a large economic gap between European neighbors, nor will there always be the political environment for open immigration.

Germany needs a higher birthrate or it will shrink, as it already does in years without ridiculous immigration numbers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #363  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2014, 10:22 AM
Lear's Avatar
Lear Lear is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Europa
Posts: 537
Exodus Campaign From Israel to Berlin, Germany
New York Times

Quote:
Israelis have for years been drawn to Berlin’s cosmopolitan flair, vibrant arts scene and advanced public transportation. There are already several places in the city where one can have authentic hummus, and there is a bimonthly Hebrew-language magazine. But a Facebook post that went viral this month, a photograph of a supermarket receipt showcasing the low price in Berlin of a beloved chocolate-pudding snack, has revived a raw debate over the meaning of out-migration.
__________________
Air.Berlin

Last edited by Lear; Oct 17, 2014 at 11:02 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #364  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2014, 2:28 PM
Lear's Avatar
Lear Lear is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Europa
Posts: 537
Push for Israelis to move to Berlin causes an uproar
USA Today


Quote:
The Move to Berlin initiative is not entirely new. The Israeli embassy in Germany estimated more than 15,000 Israelis have arrived in Berlin since 2011, after the "Rothschild Boulevard" protests in Tel Aviv that coincided with the Occupy Movement in the United States, along with the Arab Spring demonstrations in this region.

In Tel Aviv then, protesters occupied tony Rothschild Boulevard for three months in a demonstration initially sparked by the high price of cottage cheese in local groceries. Berlin these days is dotted with Israeli start-ups. A street in the Kreuzberg district is informally called "Little Tel Aviv" because so many Israelis live there.
__________________
Air.Berlin
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #365  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2014, 3:30 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 723
INSEE has just published the detailed results of the 2011 French census by countries and territories of birth. Here are the figures for the Paris Region (Île-de-France).

At the January 2011 census, the number of people living in the Paris Region who were born outside of Metropolitan France (the European part of France) was 2,739,825. Their number rose from 2,558,770 at the January 2006 census. The growth of the non-Metropolitan France born population was thus +181,055 in 5 years. Note that the growth of the non-Metropolitan France born population is the result of [arrivals] minus [departures and deaths]. Births on French territory do no enter into this equation.

Between Jan. 2006 and Jan. 2011, the total population of the Paris Region grew by 323,257 people. The non-Metropolitan France born people where thus responsible for 56% of the Paris Region's growth during those 5 years, not even including the births they had in the Paris Region during those 5 years.

The percentage of inhabitants of the Paris Region who were born outside of Metropolitan France was 23.1% at the 2011 census, up from 22.2% at the 2006 census.

Here is the population growth for each group of immigrants/migrants (people from Overseas France are migrants, but not legally immigrants) between 2009 and 2011 (INSEE started publishing detailed figures only from the 2009 census onwards). INSEE unfortunately didn't publish the detail for all the countries of the world, so I'm making the best groupings I can with what was published.

Again, keep in mind that births on French soil are not included in those figures. A person born on French soil is not an immigrant or a migrant.

Absolute population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011:
- born in Africa (including Réunion and Mayotte) outside of the Maghreb: +11,950 per year
- born in the Maghreb: +6,790 per year
- born in Asia outside of Turkey, Lebanon, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka: +4,719 per year
- born in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka: +2,512 per year
- born in Europe outside of the EU 27: +1,771 per year
- born in Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking Latin America: +1,307 per year
- born in the French West Indies (Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique) and French Guiana: +1,301 per year
- born in the UE 27 (except France): +1,137 per year
- born in Turkey: +875 per year
- born in North America (USA, Canada): +203 per year
- born in Oceania (including the French Pacific territories): +125 per year
- born in Lebanon: -196 per year

Relative population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011:
- born in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka: +3.62% per year
- born in Africa (including Réunion and Mayotte) outside of the Maghreb: +2.73% per year
- born in Europe outside of the EU 27: +2.54% per year
- born in Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking Latin America: +2.49% per year
- born in Asia outside of Turkey, Lebanon, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka: +2.20% per year
- born in Oceania (including the French Pacific territories): +1.75% per year
ALL IMMIGRANTS/MIGRANTS IN THE PARIS REGION: +1.43% per year
- born in Turkey: +1.30% per year
- born in the Maghreb: +1.12% per year
- born in North America (USA, Canada): +0.88% per year
- born in the French West Indies (Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique) and French Guiana: +0.66% per year
- born in the UE 27 (except France): +0.22% per year
- born in Lebanon: -0.97% per year

Here are the countries/territories with the biggest increases and decreases.

Absolute population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011, per country/territory of origin:
- born in Romania: +3,578 per year
- born in Algeria: +3,062 per year
- born in China: +2,155 per year
- born in the Congo-Kinshasa: +2,106 per year
- born in Tunisia: +2,053 per year
- born in Morocco: +1,675 per year
- born in Mayotte: +1,521 per year
- born in Sri Lanka: +1,486 per year
- born in Côte d'Ivoire: +1,312 per year
- born in Cameroon: +1,255 per year
...
...
- born in Martinique: -167 per year
- born in Mauritius: -171 per year
- born in Switzerland: -179 per year
- born in Lebanon: -196 per year
- born in Serbia: -383 per year
- born in Germany: -624 per year
- born in Spain: -644 per year
- born in Italy: -703 per year
- born in Portugal: -1,203 per year

Relative population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011, for the countries/territories with at least 10,000 natives living in the Paris Region:
- born in Romania: +11.91% per year
- born in Russia: +6.05% per year
- born in the Congo-Kinshasa: +5.50% per year
- born in Brazil: +5.19% per year
- born in Sri Lanka: +4.58% per year
- born in the Comoros: +3.89% per year
- born in China: +3.81% per year
- born in Mauritania: +3.67% per year
- born in Cameroon: +3.62% per year
- born in Pakistan: +3.46% per year
- born in Guinea-Conakry: +3.11% per year
- born in Côte d'Ivoire: +2.99% per year
...
...
- born in Portugal: -0.50% per year
- born in Belgium: -0.80% per year
- born in Mauritius: -0,86% per year
- born in Lebanon: -0,97% per year
- born in Italy: -1,24% per year
- born in Spain: -1,36% per year
- born in Serbia: -1,37% per year
- born in Germany: -2,57% per year
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine

Last edited by New Brisavoine; Oct 24, 2014 at 6:11 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #366  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2014, 9:24 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 723
Now that INSEE has finally published the results of the 2011 French census by place of birth, I've made this map showing the foreign-born population of France, the UK, and Spain at the 2011 censuses. Unfortunately these 3 countries are the only EU countries that I know of which have published their 2011 census figures by place of birth. In particular, neither Italy nor Germany have published their 2011 census figures by place of birth.

The map shows the share of foreign-born population in each department of France, UK county/local authority, and Spanish province. For England, I've used the ceremonial counties, whose size is more similar to the French departments and the Spanish provinces. Some very interesting regional patterns are visible on the map.

"Foreign-born" has different meanings in each country, so I've used the most homogeneous definition possible. In the UK, a foreign-born person is someone born outside of the UK (that includes the people born in the British Overseas Territories and the Channel Islands/Isle of Man, because these are not part of the UK). In Metropolitan France a foreign-born person is someone born outside of Metropolitan France (the European territory of France). That includes the people born in Overseas France now living in Metropolitan France, as well as the Pieds-Noirs from North Africa (the UK figures also include the British citizens from former Rhodesia, South Africa, etc.). In Spain, a foreign-born person is someone born outside of the current borders of Spain (so that includes for example the Spanish citizens born in the former Spanish Morocco).



The counties/departments/provinces/islands with the highest and lowest shares of foreign-born population at the 2011 census:
- Inner London: 42.2% (i.e. 42.2% of the inhabitants of Inner London at the 2011 census were born outside of the UK)
- Seine-Saint-Denis: 33.8% (i.e. 33.8% of the inhabitants of Seine-Saint-Denis at the 2011 census were born outside of Metropolitan France)
- Fuerteventura Island: 33.7% (i.e. 33.7% of the inhabitants of Fuerteventura at the 2011 census were born outside of Spain)
- Outer London: 33.1%
- Lanzarote Island: 28.7%
- Ibiza & Formentera Islands: 28.5%
- City of Paris: 26.1%
- Val-de-Marne: 25.3%

- Melilla: 23.5%
- El Hierro Island: 23.4%
- Majorca Island: 22.8%
- Val-d'Oise: 22.6%
- Alicante Province: 22.5%
- Alpes-Maritimes: 22.5%
- Hauts-de-Seine: 22.1%

- Girona Province: 21.2%
- Almeria Province: 20.6%
- Tenerife Island: 19.4%
- Berkshire: 19.3%
- Gomera Island: 19.0%
- Essonne: 18.8%
- Minorca Island: 18.5%
- Madrid Province: 18.4%
- Tarragona Province: 18.3%
- Malaga Province: 18.3%
- Lerida Province: 18.1%
- Bouches-du-Rhône: 18.1%
- Bedfordshire: 18.0%
- Castellon Province: 17.2%
- Guadalajara Province: 16.9%
- Pyrénées-Orientales: 16.8%
- Yvelines: 16.7%

- West Midlands County (Greater Birmingham): 16.6%
- La Palma Island: 16.4%
- Barcelona Province: 16.3%
- Murcia Province: 16.3%

- Seine-et-Marne: 16.2%
- Leicestershire: 16.1%
- Hérault: 16.1%
...
...
...
SPAIN: 13.5%
UK: 12.7%
METROPOLITAN FRANCE: 12.2%
...
...
...
- Jaén Province: 3.9%
- Mayenne 3.9%
- Cordova Province: 3.8%
- Cumbria: 3.7%
- Falkirk: 3.6%
- County Durham: 3.6%
- Dumfries & Galloway: 3.5%
- Vendée: 3.5%
- Isle of Anglesey: 3.5%
- South Ayrshire: 3.4%
- South Lanarkshire: 3.4%
- Orkney Islands: 3.4%
- West Dunbartonshire: 3.1%
- Manche: 3.0%
- North Lanarkshire: 3.0%
- Outer Hebrides: 2.9%
- Northumberland: 2.8%
- Pas-de-Calais: 2.8%
- Cantal: 2.8%

- Inverclyde: 2.6%
- North Ayrshire: 2.5%
- East Ayrshire: 2.3%
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
   
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Europe
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:50 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.