HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > Found City Photos

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #35981  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2016, 9:39 PM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 15,042
Oh my, fantastic images Flyingwedge!

I didn't realize the vertical sign was inspired by an un-spooled length of 35mm film.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
So...they were the Ice Cream Kuhns.
I see what you did there.

lol
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35982  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2016, 10:09 PM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 15,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by HenryHuntington View Post
I can take a hint.

It was the Union Pacific's Anaheim branch.

http://www.abandonedrails.com/Anaheim_Branch
You saw right through me HH.....it was a hint.
__________

The link you provided tell us it's origin (1917) was the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad.


Logo imprinted on bridge.


http://picture.abandonedrails.com/k3vhuhhd.jpg

"The arrowhead logo of the SPLA&SL, the "Salt Lake Route" herald, is seen cast into the Pickering Avenue bridge (over the sidewalk)
when this line was built around 1917. This bridge is immediately west of the truss bridge over Whittier Boulevard (CA Route 72)."


The description above makes it sound like this bridge & logo is still there, but I searched the area in the google-mobile and couldn't locate it.


Here's the area where I searched.


google_earth

Does anyone know, is this little piece of RR history (the arrowhead logo) still there (& I overlooked it), or has it been destroyed?

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jul 17, 2016 at 10:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35983  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2016, 10:48 PM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 15,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post

1949 - Griffith Park

Riders enjoying a Sunday afternoon jaunt in Griffith Park: (1st row l-r): Lucille Meeker (on a Triumph), Betty Drafton (on a Velocette) and Cecilia Adams (on a custom-made bike); (2nd row l-r): Frank Cooper, Chuck Parkyns, Dr. William Eschrich and Frank Erling (unsure of spelling of last name).

Life



Tourmaline, here's another image of Betty and Frank.


https://www.pinterest.com/matchlesslondon/


__
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35984  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2016, 10:55 PM
HossC's Avatar
HossC HossC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 4,000
Thanks for the additional pictures of the Academy Theatre, Flyingwedge.


---------------


This Julius Shulman image was taken out in Encino. It's " Job 2873: West Valley Medical Center, 1959".



Getty Research Institute

The layout of the medical center at 5353 Balboa Boulevard has changed several times over the years (I tried to follow the changes on Historic Aerials). I'm pretty sure that the building on the left is the one above with modifications.


GSV
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35985  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2016, 11:35 PM
CityBoyDoug's Avatar
CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 2,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Thanks for yet another fine Schulman post, Hoss. I found some more Academy Theatre images (all dated 1939) at UCLA.

Floorplan:




.
Thanks FW for this neat plan of the theater. I love plans....always so interesting. Way cool design.!!

For some reason the architect gave rather short shrift to the money making candy concession stand. I don't see it in this drawing. Plus that, you need a large store room to keep your candy supplies....

Your movie ticket money goes to pay for the film rental. The only way a theater can make operating money is from the concession stand....the drinks, candy, ice cream and popcorn. That pays all of the salaries.

In my movie theater days it cost about $50 dollars a day to keep the doors open. In 2016 dollars that's about $415 a day to keep a movie theater operating.....and in many cases a lot more.

The projectionists are probably union and they make more than a manager does.


Why they had stairs going into the toilets in those days is a mystery to me.....but many theaters had them.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35986  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 12:00 AM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 15,042
Quote:
HossC

1929 - Corner of W Whittier Boulevard and N Park Avenue.

Originally posted by BifRayRock
lapl

The building now bears the name Montebello Plaza. Looking at the alterations, I can see why they no longer call it the Tower Drive-In Market! -HossC


GSV
Excellent discovery Hoss.

I wonder if the clock tower was damaged in one of the earthquakes, and had to come down.


Here's a look from behind.


__
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35987  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 1:59 AM
UphillDonkey UphillDonkey is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Thanks for yet another fine Schulman post, Hoss. I found some more Academy Theatre images (all dated 1939) at UCLA.

Floorplan:




Lobby door detail:




This is an interesting alternate version of the tower:




This is labeled "foyer," but according to the floorplan it's the lobby:




Auditorium entrance:




This is a closer view of the etched glass panel in the previous photo; the large figure is holding an Oscar:




The credits on the lower right of the etched glass panel (just barely visible on the Auditorium Entrance photo):



Architect - S. Charles Lee
Mural Artist - Millard Sheets
Glass Sculpture - Carvarts, Inc.

Thanks also for showing the projection booth. When I was a little kid my grandfather was the projectionist at the
Gordon Theatre on La Brea Avenue (now the Regent Showcase), and I remember being in the booth a few times. He
worked a day job before going to the theater at night, and he used to sleep once the movie started. But there was
something in the projector that clicked or made some noise near the end of a reel that always woke him up in time
to start the next reel.
The floor plan is correct, the Foyer is inside the building (as the picture shows) while the Lobby is outside the doors where the ticket office is located.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35988  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 2:29 AM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 15,042
I found this postcard a couple days ago on eBay. (I think the description is a bit confusing)

"In order to accommodate the thousands of Comrades to the 20th American Legion National Convention at Los Angeles, Sept. 19-22, 1938,
Victory Post No. 54 offers for your approval and invites you to visit "The Longest Bar In The World" located at 224 South Hill Street, Los Angeles Calif."


eBay

The description makes this sound like a bar that was built specifically for the 4 day convention? (by post #54)

Also, what building was located at 224 South Hill Street? (I'm pretty sure it's just a lot now) -although 222 South Hill is still standing.



Here's the reverse of the postcard.


We've visited the longest bar (or was it soda fountain?) on NLA, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't this one.


_

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jul 18, 2016 at 2:59 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35989  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 3:05 AM
Flyingwedge's Avatar
Flyingwedge Flyingwedge is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by UphillDonkey View Post
The floor plan is correct, the Foyer is inside the building (as the picture shows) while the Lobby is outside the doors where the ticket office is located.
Oops . . . duh! Thank you for pointing that out, UD.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35990  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 3:27 AM
ConstructDTLA's Avatar
ConstructDTLA ConstructDTLA is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: DTLA
Posts: 1,452
Hey guys - does anyone have an image of the 'last queen anne on Bunker Hill'?

According to many articles it was at Sunset & Figueroa. Does that even count as Bunker Hill? I've searched everywhere, no images turn up...


"1880s Queen Anne house left at Cesar Chavez Avenue and Figueroa Street in the late 1980s, when Palmer began work there on the Orsini. It was called the Giese House and it was protected under preservation laws. There were plans in place to move the house to Angelino Heights, but Palmer's workers demolished it instead."

http://la.curbed.com/2014/11/25/1001...ng-downtown-la
__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35991  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 4:52 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,014
Someone needs to be found who could do something similar for Los Angeles:

http://www.popsci.com/80-thousand-ph...gion-3&lnk=txt

https://www.oldnyc.org/#717402f-a
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35992  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 12:42 PM
HossC's Avatar
HossC HossC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 4,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

The link you provided tell us it's origin (1917) was the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad.

Logo imprinted on bridge.


http://picture.abandonedrails.com/k3vhuhhd.jpg

"The arrowhead logo of the SPLA&SL, the "Salt Lake Route" herald, is seen cast into the Pickering Avenue bridge (over the sidewalk)
when this line was built around 1917. This bridge is immediately west of the truss bridge over Whittier Boulevard (CA Route 72)."


The description above makes it sound like this bridge & logo is still there, but I searched the area in the google-mobile and couldn't locate it.

Does anyone know, is this little piece of RR history (the arrowhead logo) still there (& I overlooked it), or has it been destroyed?
The pedestrian tunnel was under the bridge at the intersection of Whittier Boulevard and Pickering Avenue. It can still be seen if you go back to 2007.


GSV

The bridge has since been redesigned (the pillar in the center of Pickering Avenue has gone too), and the pedestrian tunnel is no longer there. The logo is still visible, but I think it may have be re-made rather than preserved.


GSV
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35993  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 4:11 PM
odinthor's Avatar
odinthor odinthor is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 988
Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I found this postcard a couple days ago on eBay. (I think the description is a bit confusing)

"In order to accommodate the thousands of Comrades to the 20th American Legion National Convention at Los Angeles, Sept. 19-22, 1938,
Victory Post No. 54 offers for your approval and invites you to visit "The Longest Bar In The World" located at 224 South Hill Street, Los Angeles Calif."


eBay

The description makes this sound like a bar that was built specifically for the 4 day convention? (by post #54)

Also, what building was located at 224 South Hill Street? (I'm pretty sure it's just a lot now) -although 222 South Hill is still standing.



Here's the reverse of the postcard.


We've visited the longest bar (or was it soda fountain?) on NLA, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't this one.


_
Some data etc. on 224 S. Hill St., evidently known as the Bicknell Bldg., all from the Los Angeles Times:

--November 20, 1904: J.D. Bicknell is improving and altering a four-story brick building at 224-228 S. Hill at a cost of $60,000.

--September 2, 1933: a Warehouse Shoe Sale is to take place at the address.

--Your Longest Bar postcard is about an event occurring September 19-22, 1938.

--December 16, 1938 (right-hand column unrelated):

LA Times, via ProQuest, via the CSULB Library.

--January 18, 1948: The former assets of He & She of California are being auctioned off, the assets being composed of garment manufacturing supplies etc.

--May 10, 1951:

LA Times, via ProQuest, via the CSULB Library.

--December 19, 1957, referred to as the Bicknell Bldg., and as a clothing factory, with the Salvation Army Thrift Shop at 224 1/2 S. Hill St.:

LA Times, via ProQuest, via the CSULB Library.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35994  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 4:19 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 996
Looking for hills that "Our Gang," among others, may have used and revisited some flooding photos. (Thought they were NLA'd before, or maybe another familiar database.) First windshield view reminds of proceeding south on Sepulveda or Overland, but haven't been able to pin point - yet. This low lying area would make a great spread for a Santa Monica Freeway.


Quote:
Flooded Area In Palms, Between Beverly Hills And Culver City
http://images.google.com/hosted/life...3d3008ace.html







More



























The End
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35995  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 5:41 PM
Flyingwedge's Avatar
Flyingwedge Flyingwedge is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post




This is looking northwest on Manning Avenue from just south of Queensbury Drive. The October 2014 GSV view shows
the distinctive house at right being remodeled, and it no longer looks the same:


Mar 2014 GSV
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35996  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 5:57 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 996
Thanks.

Could have sworn this was asked and answered but was unable to locate using usual search function. I should have been more specific about the Sepulveda/Overland guesses. Was focusing on the windshield view of the 76 Station. Any ideas?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35997  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 6:58 PM
GaylordWilshire's Avatar
GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 3,564
Careful...this update to a video familiar to NLAers might make you dizzy...




http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cul...-ago-and-today
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35998  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 8:13 PM
HossC's Avatar
HossC HossC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 4,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConstructDTLA View Post

Hey guys - does anyone have an image of the 'last queen anne on Bunker Hill'?

According to many articles it was at Sunset & Figueroa. Does that even count as Bunker Hill? I've searched everywhere, no images turn up...


"1880s Queen Anne house left at Cesar Chavez Avenue and Figueroa Street in the late 1980s, when Palmer began work there on the Orsini. It was called the Giese House and it was protected under preservation laws. There were plans in place to move the house to Angelino Heights, but Palmer's workers demolished it instead."

http://la.curbed.com/2014/11/25/1001...ng-downtown-la
Despite several mentions, I haven't found any pictures of the Giese House yet. This may be a stupid question, but which house was it? This roughly south-looking image dates from 1954. It looks like every corner of the intersection of Sunset and Figueroa had a gas station.


Detail of picture in USC Digital Library

While we're in the area, these two houses were on the opposite side of Sunset (at 841 and 835), just out-of-shot in the image above. Seen here in 1960, Historic Aerials shows them gone by 1964.


California State Library
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35999  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 9:56 PM
HossC's Avatar
HossC HossC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 4,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post

Careful...this update to a video familiar to NLAers might make you dizzy...



http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cul...-ago-and-today
What an interesting and sad comparison, GW. I think LAPL's Central Library was one of the few buildings which has survived. They couldn't even follow all of the original route!


----------------


The other day, while I was looking for something else, I came across this interesting building at 2312 Whittier Boulevard. A quick Google search told me that it was once the Monterey Theatre. It apparently opened in 1939, and has since been home to a nightclub and a church.


GSV

The image below, dated 1983, is one of two I found which show the theater as the Teatro Blanquita. So far, that's the earliest I can go. Somewhere there must be a picture of the building in its original guise.


www.americanclassicimages.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36000  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2016, 9:59 PM
HossC's Avatar
HossC HossC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 4,000
The Julius Shulman pictures of Los Angeles are getting thin on the ground again, so here's another single image. This is "Job 6329: First Interstate Bank building (Beverly Hills, Calif.), 1985".



I find the colors very striking, and finally decided to leave them as they were. While I was toying with the adjustments, I spotted a detail that's not obvious in the original. Inside the circular part of the building is what looks like a safe. Has anyone got any more details?



Getty Research Institute

GSV doesn't make the building at 9601 Wilshire Boulevard look as good as Julius Shulman did, but it hasn't changed much. It now seems to belong to the Bank of America.


GSV
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts

Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > Found City Photos
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:28 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.