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  #41  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 5:18 PM
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  #42  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 5:59 PM
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Originally Posted by north 42 View Post
I would say Halifax punches well above it’s weight given it’s metro is just over 400,000. It’s effectively acts as the go to city for the Maritime provinces.
Halifax is another great example.And those Victoria pics ^ Nice job MonkeyRonin!
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  #43  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 6:00 PM
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Des Moines, Omaha, Tulsa and Honolulu. The four looks like much bigger metro areas. Maybe due strong economy and big hinterlands.
Outside the US, Zurich and Geneve. Frankfurt and Edinburgh to a lesser extent.
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  #44  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by pico44 View Post
I honestly can't think of worse answer to this question than Topeka, Kansas. I've spent some time there and it is depressed as hell. Some cities are lucky enough to be stuck in previous eras that are lovely and quaint. Not Topeka, it's stuck in 1977. My wife lived there for a while as a child, and when she visited some old friends and they went to the same restaurant in the same 1970s strip mall she used to go to 25 years ago; and they had the same menu the same prices! And I've never seen a single pedestrian in any of my visits there, and I've only ever heard of one, and he mugged my sister-in-law! It's like a living William Eggleston photograph.

I love it
I lived in Lawrence, Ks for a couple of years from 1994-96. I was in high school then. We went to Kansas City more than Topeka. So my knowledge of Topeka is scant.
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  #45  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 11:30 PM
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I like Victoria's density and older buildings. How many people in the city and metro?
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  #46  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Dariusb View Post
I like Victoria's density and older buildings. How many people in the city and metro?
As of 2016 Census:
City: 85,000
Metro: 370,000
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  #47  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 2:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
I’ve been curious about Tucson since I was a kid. Albuquerque too.

My sister is law went to NAU in Flagstaff and through that connection my brother spends a week there a year. He raves about the place. Says it’s a Southwestern Asheville.

Speaking of, shouldn’t Asheville be in this discussion?
Damn you, that was supposed to be a secret!
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  #48  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 4:16 PM
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Originally Posted by skysoar View Post
LOL...lets just say the visual of Toledos skyline is somewhat very impressive compared to cities its size. I heard it looked like an atom bomb, or cluster bombs hit it, but a neutron bomb...wow.

ha yeah much of the time, but not entirely. downtown toledo comes quite alive after work in the downtown warehouse district and also during mudhens games and weekly riverfront events in good weather. its really nice around there at those times actually.

as for the city itself, people would kill for an old west end in their city and, speaking of punching above its weight, for its fantastic art museum and zoo. and downtown has a kids science museum that is pretty popular.



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  #49  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 6:58 PM
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ha yeah much of the time, but not entirely. downtown toledo comes quite alive after work in the downtown warehouse district and also during mudhens games and weekly riverfront events in good weather. its really nice around there at those times actually.

as for the city itself, people would kill for an old west end in their city and, speaking of punching above its weight, for its fantastic art museum and zoo. and downtown has a kids science museum that is pretty popular.



I can vouch for the Zoo and Museum.... top 10 zoo nationwide. The museum holds is own with all but the top few in the country. I'd expect these assets in places the size of Denver, Minneapolis, etc... I wish Austin had assets like this.
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  #50  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 8:09 PM
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How about Durham/Chapel Hill MSA.

It's only a region of 575,000, part of the Greater Triangle CSA region of 2.2 million. Home to Duke University and UNC. High incomes, nice downtown areas, high paying jobs in the RTP with booming population growth.

Anchored by Chapel Hill pop: 58,000 and Durham pop: 250,000
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  #51  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 8:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
How about Durham/Chapel Hill MSA.

It's only a region of 575,000, part of the Greater Triangle CSA region of 2.2 million. Home to Duke University and UNC. High incomes, nice downtown areas, high paying jobs in the RTP with booming population growth.

Anchored by Chapel Hill pop: 58,000 and Durham pop: 250,000
Having been on the ground there only once it felt very much a part of a larger Metro area...some CSA's seem like stretches while some feel as if they are really just one MSA and to me this felt like one Metro Area.
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  #52  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 8:31 PM
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Having been on the ground there only once it felt very much a part of a larger Metro area...some CSA's seem like stretches while some feel as if they are really just one MSA and to me this felt like one Metro Area.
Yeah, it's kind of odd that it's not considered the same MSA. I lived in Durham and Chapel Hill and while there all of it was called The Triangle and the local news was from Raleigh, however the newspaper was local. The Herald and The News & Observer!

The ugly step child was always Raleigh although that may have changed and that was probably based off of local rivalries amongst the schools: UNC - Duke - NC State.
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  #53  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 8:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ATXboom View Post
I can vouch for the Zoo and Museum.... top 10 zoo nationwide. The museum holds is own with all but the top few in the country. I'd expect these assets in places the size of Denver, Minneapolis, etc... I wish Austin had assets like this.
Yeah, Toledo's zoo is actually an example of reverse benefit (from the other thread about smaller cities near bigger cities). It is pretty common for people to drive from Metro Detroit to visit the Toledo Zoo, despite having a pretty good zoo in Metro Detroit.

Last edited by iheartthed; Nov 18, 2019 at 8:56 PM.
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  #54  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
I’ve been curious about Tucson since I was a kid. Albuquerque too.

My sister is law went to NAU in Flagstaff and through that connection my brother spends a week there a year. He raves about the place. Says it’s a Southwestern Asheville.

Speaking of, shouldn’t Asheville be in this discussion?
Flag is great, Tucson is trash that should flattened Attila the Hun style.
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  #55  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 1:16 AM
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^Err, what?

Flagstaff is a very nice small city in the vein of Bend, OR, Boulder, Asheville, etc, but Tucson has a lot more variety with the old neighborhoods around downtown, 4th street etc. Of course it's quite a bit larger than flag, but I've always thought they represent AZ very well.

I've mentioned it here before, but I think this is a category the south does best, despite it's reputation for sunbelt urbanism.

Asheville, Greenville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Charleston, Savannah...those six compare favorably to any six similar sized cities anywhere else, especially the midwest and west which I call home. There are certainly plenty of places with better bones than places like Greenville and Chattanooga, but the combo of bones + vibrancy makes for pretty livable places.
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  #56  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 1:46 AM
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^^^ I would also agree with those cities. A few of them also have some room to grow and they could potentially be some of the top small cities in the coming decade.
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  #57  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 1:16 PM
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^^^ I would also agree with those cities. A few of them also have some room to grow and they could potentially be some of the top small cities in the coming decade.
If the high-speed rail from Atlanta to Charlotte goes through, that could be transformative for Greenville and Spartanburg.
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  #58  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2019, 1:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
Yeah, it's kind of odd that it's not considered the same MSA. I lived in Durham and Chapel Hill and while there all of it was called The Triangle and the local news was from Raleigh, however the newspaper was local. The Herald and The News & Observer!

The ugly step child was always Raleigh although that may have changed and that was probably based off of local rivalries amongst the schools: UNC - Duke - NC State.
It all used to be one MSA until the 2003 revisions. With most of RTP, the region's primary jobs center, being located in Durham County, along with some land uses that separate Durham and Wake counties geographically, Durham-Chapel Hill wound up as its own MSA. It's kind of a fluke really but I don't think Durham really minds having its own MSA.
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