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View Poll Results: Which state will end up with the highest population?
Georgia 21 35.59%
North Carolina 38 64.41%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 3:31 PM
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Georgia or North Carolina: Which will end up with highest population?

These two states have been neck and neck in explosive growth within the past decade, and are about the same population wise as of 2018 census with GA slightly ahead.

Which state will be on top in the end?
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  #2  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 4:11 PM
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Probably North Carolina, as it has multiple large cities with high growth rates, as well as smaller metros that are also growing. NC has: Charlotte, Asheville, Raleigh, Durham, as well as other smaller metros like Fayetteville and Wilmington. I think Wilmington has the potential to be a boom town in the future, due to it's coastal location, mild weather and low costs.

Georgia is dominated by Atlanta, which is still growing crazily but at some point or another will slow down. There are no other booming cities in Georgia.
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  #3  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 4:28 PM
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If Savannah, Macon, and Augusta suddenly became more hot on the map, I think Georgia could still challenge NC.
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  #4  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 5:59 PM
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In the end probably north Carolina unless some of the smaller Georgia cities outside of Atlanta metro suddenly take off explosively.

North Carolina has a smattering of similarly sized cities that are all growing and can all continue to grow significantly in the decades to come.

So probably North Carolina
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  #5  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 6:18 PM
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North Carolina, due to the economy, proxy to major power zones/metros, and weather that isn't as hot and humid. Offers quasi mid-Atlantic/Northeast lifestyle and mindset at a discount, and with okay year-round weather (a blend of 4 seasons).
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 6:21 PM
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At the end of the decade, or... THE END...? lol
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 8:04 PM
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While we can expect the race to remain close for the next several decades, "in the end" North Carolina eventually have a higher population, following the 2732 invasion by the Xel'Shia'Qo Space Empire, and its subsequent human resettlement policies.
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  #8  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 9:45 PM
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There are good points made about North Carolina. How much is Georgia's growth attributable just to the Atlanta MSA? And while Atlanta is a great city, there needs to be serious investment in transit and a change in the car-driving culture for the growth to be sustainable.

There are many more cylinders firing in the cities of North Carolina.

I think both states grow at a rapid rate compared to the rest of the country, but North Carolina will take a permanent lead within the next 20 years.
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  #9  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 9:46 PM
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North Carolina.
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  #10  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 10:01 PM
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Georgia for at least 2020. They have been growing about the same percent for at least 2000. Georgia actually became bigger than N Carolina between 1990 and 2000 due to a huge Atlanta growth spurt during that decade - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000_United_States_Census

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_U...State_rankings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._by_population

Although Georgia is dominated by one big city, that does not mean that it won't retain the lead. After all, Illinois with one big metro is bigger than Ohio with 3-5 midsize metros.
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  #11  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BnaBreaker View Post
At the end of the decade, or... THE END...? lol
Two states enter, one state leaves.
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  #12  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 11:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
North Carolina, due to the economy, proxy to major power zones/metros, and weather that isn't as hot and humid. Offers quasi mid-Atlantic/Northeast lifestyle and mindset at a discount, and with okay year-round weather (a blend of 4 seasons).
BS, NC is just as HOT AND HUMID, and what does that have to do with it??....Please...Atlanta is more than every metro combined in NC., and Savannah's port destroys anything in NC, Augusta, economy is strong in GA as well...There are more International transplants and Yankees in GA as well.
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 11:43 PM
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Originally Posted by bigstick View Post
BS, NC is just as HOT AND HUMID, and what does that have to do with it??....Please...Atlanta is more than every metro combined in NC., and Savannah's port destroys anything in NC, Augusta, economy is strong in GA as well...There are more International transplants and Yankees in GA as well.
Yeah and the Chances that Savannah will suddenly become Atlanta 2.0 is very low while Raleigh-Durham, Greensboro, and Charlotte could each become major metropolitan areas of several million a piece if growth continues

And you have a handful of smaller cities like Wilmington, Asheville, Feyetville That will probably top out as million + metros in and of themselves in several decades.

Georgia will always bee completely dominated by Atlanta.
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Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 12:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Obadno View Post
Yeah and the Chances that Savannah will suddenly become Atlanta 2.0 is very low while Raleigh-Durham, Greensboro, and Charlotte could each become major metropolitan areas of several million a piece if growth continues

And you have a handful of smaller cities like Wilmington, Asheville, Feyetville That will probably top out as million + metros in and of themselves in several decades.

Georgia will always bee completely dominated by Atlanta.
Wilmington, Asheville, and Fayetteville will never "BEE" 1 million...
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  #15  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 1:33 AM
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Wilmington, Asheville, and Fayetteville will never "BEE" 1 million...
Never say never, although it would take decades... The 5-county Asheville metro is already approaching half a million, and Buncombe County itself, where the city is located, is expected to add 60,000 more people by 2030. Fayetteville, meanwhile, is close enough to the Raleigh area for the two of them to eventually sprawl together.
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Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 2:21 AM
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It depends. If the economy continues to favor fewer and fewer 'alpha' cities and metros, then greater Atlanta could pull Georgia ahead. North Carolina has several healthy mid-sized metros, but even taken together they would not likely supersede Atlanta in such a scenario.

If, however, capital, talent, etc. are dispersed more evenly across classes and regions in the coming decades, it's possible North Carolina's dispersed metropolitan populations could grow that state faster and more sustainably.

How do house prices compare between the two states? That might, ultimately, be what decides future population growth.
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  #17  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 5:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
Probably North Carolina, as it has multiple large cities with high growth rates, as well as smaller metros that are also growing. NC has: Charlotte, Asheville, Raleigh, Durham, as well as other smaller metros like Fayetteville and Wilmington. I think Wilmington has the potential to be a boom town in the future, due to it's coastal location, mild weather and low costs.
Is the Triad really that obscure? Or did you intentionally omit those cities?
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Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 6:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
While we can expect the race to remain close for the next several decades, "in the end" North Carolina eventually have a higher population, following the 2732 invasion by the Xel'Shia'Qo Space Empire, and its subsequent human resettlement policies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 View Post
Two states enter, one state leaves.
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Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 7:23 AM
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I can see Charlotte becoming bigger in the coming decade. A lot of development is going down there now if you visits the development thread. As for Asheville and the smaller towns, they will have to initiate some pretty strict zoning requirements for increasing density. Especially Asheville. Last time I was there, I noticed that the city was surrounded by hills and a river. With things are done right, it could potentially be even more quaint and amazing with added activity.


Speaking of North Carolina and Georgia, how about Tennessee? Nashville is growing decently and Memphis can always experience a renaissance. Chattanooga and Knoxville are also up and coming with similar characteristics to the western NC cities. I think that whole upper South region is primed for something great in the near future.
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  #20  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by jd3189 View Post
I can see Charlotte becoming bigger in the coming decade. A lot of development is going down there now if you visits the development thread. As for Asheville and the smaller towns, they will have to initiate some pretty strict zoning requirements for increasing density. Especially Asheville. Last time I was there, I noticed that the city was surrounded by hills and a river. With things are done right, it could potentially be even more quaint and amazing with added activity.


Speaking of North Carolina and Georgia, how about Tennessee? Nashville is growing decently and Memphis can always experience a renaissance. Chattanooga and Knoxville are also up and coming with similar characteristics to the western NC cities. I think that whole upper South region is primed for something great in the near future.
Tennessee has not had the same type of growth NC and GA have had over the past several decades. NC and GA have been very close in population for a long time now so that's why this particular comparison is being made.
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