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  #21  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 12:02 PM
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yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
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According to Wikipedia, "Manufacturing Belt" was the name of that region before the 1970's. Somebody knows if this term was widely used as "Rust Belt", "Corn Belt", "Sun Belt" are used today?
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  #22  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 2:22 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Baltimore, Camden, and Reading were never the Rust Belt. Massachusetts was never the Rust Belt. Just because a place had manufacturing 75-100 years ago doesn't mean it's the Rust Belt.

Maybe someone can correct me, but the Rust Belt is generally accepted to be Midwest/Great Lakes cities that saw industries leave when Japan became a giant, and were run down for a couple decades. The Rust Belt is based on what happened in the 1970s and 1980s. Not every place in the Rust Belt is part of the Rust Belt, but the Rust Belt generally is Buffalo, western Pennsylvania, northern Ohio, southeast/southern Michigan, northern Indiana, and northern Illinois. At least that is what I have always thought it was.
I think every place you named was the Rust Belt at one point.
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  #23  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 2:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Baltimore, Camden, and Reading were never the Rust Belt. Massachusetts was never the Rust Belt. Just because a place had manufacturing 75-100 years ago doesn't mean it's the Rust Belt.

Maybe someone can correct me, but the Rust Belt is generally accepted to be Midwest/Great Lakes cities that saw industries leave when Japan became a giant, and were run down for a couple decades. The Rust Belt is based on what happened in the 1970s and 1980s. Not every place in the Rust Belt is part of the Rust Belt, but the Rust Belt generally is Buffalo, western Pennsylvania, northern Ohio, southeast/southern Michigan, northern Indiana, and northern Illinois. At least that is what I have always thought it was.
Agree. The Rust Belt is the name of the area that's economy was based on heavy manufacturing and was left--as the name the implies--to "rust" as manufacturing jobs left the US.
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  #24  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 3:08 PM
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^ as someone who grew up right in the middle of it, sounds good to me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by yuriandrade View Post
According to Wikipedia, "Manufacturing Belt" was the name of that region before the 1970's. Somebody knows if this term was widely used as "Rust Belt", "Corn Belt", "Sun Belt" are used today?
i can say -- yes it was used, as were the others, but no where near as much as rust belt was used afterwards.

and its kind of nice to see most people here agree the old rust belt perjorative is quite an outdated term to be using today. time marches on.
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  #25  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 6:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Baltimore, Camden, and Reading were never the Rust Belt. Massachusetts was never the Rust Belt. Just because a place had manufacturing 75-100 years ago doesn't mean it's the Rust Belt.

Maybe someone can correct me, but the Rust Belt is generally accepted to be Midwest/Great Lakes cities that saw industries leave when Japan became a giant, and were run down for a couple decades. The Rust Belt is based on what happened in the 1970s and 1980s. Not every place in the Rust Belt is part of the Rust Belt, but the Rust Belt generally is Buffalo, western Pennsylvania, northern Ohio, southeast/southern Michigan, northern Indiana, and northern Illinois. At least that is what I have always thought it was.
The Rust Belt extends well into upstate NY way past Buffalo into NYS's Capital District. Western Mass is very rust belt-ish or was. As were areas in southern NH and NE MA. They largely recovered. Manchester NH since repurposed all those vacant mills into offices.
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  #26  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 6:14 PM
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What is a "recovered rust belt city"? Looks like Boston and Philly and Baltimore went to rehab and recovered from rust belt syndrome?

Massachusetts seems to have recovered, and Allentown/Bethlehem PA.
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  #27  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 6:48 PM
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Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Baltimore are recovered rust belt cities but no Chicago? Chicago, Columbus, Grand Rapids, and Indianapolis should have some green around them.
Indy and Cbus should have nothing but white surrounding them-they were never really rust belt cities.
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Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 View Post
I've always gotten the impression that after Chicago, places like Kansas City, Columbus, Indianapolis, Grand Rapids and Minneapolis/St. Paul best represented the Midwest's attempts to shake it's Rust Belt image, at least over the past several decades.

Then again, there's places like Cincinnati that were never really Rust Belt.
If Cincinnati was never rust belt, then Columbus sure as hell was never rust belt.
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  #28  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2019, 8:42 PM
Buckeye Native 001 Buckeye Native 001 is offline
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I don't believe Columbus (nor any of the cities I listed in my previous post) are rust belt at all. They might share some characteristics (Cincinnati included), but not to the extent that the map implied.
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  #29  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2019, 1:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 View Post
I don't believe Columbus (nor any of the cities I listed in my previous post) are rust belt at all. They might share some characteristics (Cincinnati included), but not to the extent that the map implied.
Ok I must have misunderstood the full meaning of your post. I agree that the broad brush of the map's rust belt is too broad. And I am sure there are some cities in other parts of the country that had large manufacturing bases in are more rust belt than many of the cities you listed.
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  #30  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2019, 2:32 PM
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I never thought of the east coast (Boston, NY, Philly, Baltimore, DC) as rust belt. To me, the rust belt has been places like Allentown, Scranton, Altoona, Johnstown, Pittsburgh, Erie, Cleveland, Youngstown, Detroit, and places along the Ohio River. Columbus, Dayton, etc were never big or as big on manufacturing as these other locations. Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and Allentown were all the big manufacturing centers (automobiles and steel), and Scranton, Altoona, Johnstown supplied much of the materials used to produce steel.

As some folks have posted, every place has its flourishing areas and its floundering ones. Pittsburgh, in general, has recovered. Look at places that used to be problem areas like East Liberty and The Strip, but it does have areas that are starting to go downhill (Carrick).
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  #31  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2019, 8:05 PM
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That Ohio portion of the map is wrong. Columbus and Cincinnati were never "rust belt." Dayton, arguably due to car manufacturing and would be an island like St. Louis, but otherwise, southern Ohio was never a "rust belt" type of place. North of Route 30/Lincoln Highway is Ohio's traditional rustbelt.
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  #32  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2019, 8:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonboy1983 View Post
I never thought of the east coast (Boston, NY, Philly, Baltimore, DC) as rust belt.
Large sections of Philadelphia and Baltimore are still pretty "rusty".

I don't think it's much of a stretch at all to call them rust belt cities, considering their industrial/manufacturing histories and associated disinvestment and massive job losses. The difference being their locations and easier/quicker post-industrial economic transitions than what has happened in regions to the west.
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