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  #241  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2019, 8:35 PM
craigs craigs is offline
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Detroit's street layout was not a product of France or French planners, it was the partially-enacted plan by one Augustus Woodward, who first envisioned the unusual design in 1805. According to this history of the plan:

"Woodward arrived in Detroit less than a month after the [1805] fire, the citizens in readiness to begin rebuilding the village. Woodward persuaded them to hold off, however, so officials could consider the best way to proceed. Preventing the spread of fire called for broad avenues and large lots, which Woodward ensured featured into his layout. Despite such practicalities, few could have probably imagined a plan more fantastic than the one he finally arrived at: a system of dividing land into triangles, allotting each landowner the same area but under the new configuration.

Woodward traveled to Washington that winter to obtain approval of the plan, then returned to Detroit to lay out an improved version of it over the summer of 1806."
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  #242  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2019, 9:02 PM
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sopas ej sopas ej is offline
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Originally Posted by craigs View Post
Detroit's street layout was not a product of France or French planners, it was the partially-enacted plan by one Augustus Woodward, who first envisioned the unusual design in 1805. According to this history of the plan:

"Woodward arrived in Detroit less than a month after the [1805] fire, the citizens in readiness to begin rebuilding the village. Woodward persuaded them to hold off, however, so officials could consider the best way to proceed. Preventing the spread of fire called for broad avenues and large lots, which Woodward ensured featured into his layout. Despite such practicalities, few could have probably imagined a plan more fantastic than the one he finally arrived at: a system of dividing land into triangles, allotting each landowner the same area but under the new configuration.

Woodward traveled to Washington that winter to obtain approval of the plan, then returned to Detroit to lay out an improved version of it over the summer of 1806."
That's very interesting. I would think Detroit would have some vestiges in its street grid from when it was a French settlement.

In Los Angeles, for example, its downtown streets are not true north/south or east/west. When Felipe de Neve founded the Pueblo of Los Angeles in 1781, the Spanish "Laws of the Indies" dictated that the town's plaza be oriented at a 45 degree angle from true N/S/E/W. In reality, they were only able to do a 36 degree angle from the cardinal directions because of the constantly meandering LA River (before it was channelized in concrete). This is why LA has a clashing street grid; as the city expanded, the Yankees introduced true east/west and north south streets: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Do...4d-118.2467693

Notice to the west of downtown LA is Hoover Street, which is true north/south, and was LA's original western city boundary.
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  #243  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2019, 9:07 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Originally Posted by craigs View Post
Detroit's street layout was not a product of France or French planners, it was the partially-enacted plan by one Augustus Woodward, who first envisioned the unusual design in 1805.
The Woodward plan was largely not fulfilled, as you noted. This link explains how the French farms gave way to part of Detroit's street grid:

http://detroiturbanism.blogspot.com/...ng-future.html

Further away from the river, Detroit is gridded according to the township system.
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  #244  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2019, 9:46 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
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yeah that is very interesting about detroit. i didnt think the french laid out modern detroit, but wasnt sure. so thats who woodward was.

cleveland had a much later major plan that wasnt completed either, the group plan of 1903 for government buildings. it was based on the earlier chicago exposition of 1893.

http://www.clevelandmemory.org/groupplan/
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