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  #11721  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 10:04 PM
Godzilla Godzilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcarlton View Post
"Ornate street lights -- relics of gingerbread era -- H.J. Lindhardt, Bureau of Street Lighing, examines fixtures." -- Examiner clipping attached to verso, dated 4 October 1959.

USC
Something to be said for simplicity. Less obtrusive lighting deserves its own post.

120 N. Norton Ave. Undated

Lapl
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  #11722  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 10:25 PM
Godzilla Godzilla is offline
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Joan Blondell residence.

Unk date and specific location.
Lapl

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Same house? ^^





From http://www.elbrendel.com

http://shareddarkness.com/2008/08/30...ll-in-tub.aspx
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  #11723  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 10:48 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Egyptmania/Windemere Ranch/Wallace Neff

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post
I noticed the relief but was more transfixed on the fact that building was designed to appear wider at the base than its top. This was as I tried to picture the building inverted so that the white area becomes a real pediment. Is an upside down design connected with King Tut's Curse?
LOL. I have no idea.

We've had bouts of Egypt-mania before. The Washington Monument was designed in the 1830s and cities along "America's Nile" were named Thebes, Karnak, Memphis, etc. Yanks are forever looking for an origin myth, some ancient inspiration or source of our supposed greatness: Greek, Roman, Egyptian. We'll try on anything for size. Even before the King Tut discovery America was romancing Egypt again. There were five Cleopatra movies between 1908 and 1918 and Theda Bara was a big star. Idealized Anglo "wholesomeness" and puritanism is forever warring in our tiny hearts with the exotic. Ancient Egypt, with its symbolism and emphasis on the afterlife is certainly exotic.

The Egyptian Theater opened mere weeks before the Tut discovery, making it a huge, fortuitous hit. The Egyptian Theater was supposed to be "Spanish-Oriental" (hence the incongruous red-tile roof) but developer Charles Toberman convinced Grauman to change it to Egyptian-style after construction had begun to save money. Raymond M. Kennedy of Meyer and Holler ran with it:

wiki

And speaking of ranches and sphinxes:

Here's the Andrew McNally (co-founder of Rand-McNally) Windemere Ranch out in La Mirada (Frederick Roehrig was the architect). McNally's grandson, architect Wallace Neff, was born on the property in 1895.

The gates to Windemere:

Kanner via http://so-cal-arch-history.com/archives/1847

The ranch's citrus label based on the photo
(Now he's a she and the sphinxes have their shirts off. Sex sells):

eBay

(I dunno why sphinxes were chosen, but I'll bet GW knows all about it.)

It looks like the above today. 76 degrees, 8% humidity, hot sun, cool breeze, snow-capped mountains in the distance and not a cloud in the sky. All doors and windows thrown open. If you're not already, wish you were here. It's gorgeous.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jan 20, 2013 at 11:22 PM.
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  #11724  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 10:57 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Herron & Baker grocery store. Next to M. Fleisher & Co.

Undated. No location provided.
Lapl

No listing as of 1909. There are a few grocers named Baker. (3148 S. Hoover - now part of USC Campus ?? - 200 E. 61st - ?? 1108 E. 12th Street ??)
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  #11725  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 11:11 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by revheavyg View Post
The Rancho Los Amigos Hospital began in the late 1880's as the Los Angeles County Poor Farm located in downey, Ca. The plans and construction of the hospital began in 1887. The hospital opened it's doors to serve the public in 1888. the name was changed to "Rancho Los Amigos" In 1932. The south side of the hospital campus is closed down, but you can visit it, its the size of a small town. There are claims on the internet that it is haunted.
photo-tumblr

Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, or Rancho, dates back to 1888 when indigent patients from the Los Angeles County Hospital were relocated to what was then known as the Los Angeles County Poor Farm Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy


Quote:
Staff members for the Home for the Aged Little Sisters of the Poor, known as St. Ann's Home for the Aged, stand on the steps outside the Home, located at 2700 E. First Street in Boyle Heights. The Little Sisters of the Poor is a Roman Catholic religious order for women founded in the 19th century by Jeanne Jugan, who felt the need to care for the many impoverished elderly who where found to be living in the streets of French towns and cities. This Home's history began in 1905 when Edward J. LeBreton of San Francisco gave $300,000 to build the brick structure, which was consecrated in 1908. Located on nearly eight acres, the Home served the community until 1979, when the facility was closed
Lapl
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  #11726  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 11:15 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
The Egyptian Theater opened mere weeks before the Tut discovery, making it a huge, fortuitous hit. The Egyptian Theater was supposed to be "Spanish-Oriental" (hence the incongruous red-tile roof) but developer Charles Toberman convinced Grauman to change it to Egyptian-style after construction had begun to save money. Raymond M. Kennedy of Meyer and Holler ran with it:

wiki


Neon Cheops?

November 1937.
LAPL
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  #11727  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 11:37 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post


Neon Cheops?


You bet:


Qbans/flickr

Angelenos got no shame.
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  #11728  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 11:45 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Undated grocery store on Commercial Street. Same time period as Chinatown Barbershop? (Probably well before the advent of strip joints and Burbank's first Fire Station/City Hall.)


Commercial Street Grocery (No vermin with our vittles!)
Lapl

Chinatown Barbershop undated
Lapl



Burbank City Hall and Fire Station, Third Street and Olive Ave. (Built in '15 unbuilt in '59)
Lapl
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  #11729  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 12:07 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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human-scale streetlamps

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post
Something to be said for simplicity. Less obtrusive lighting deserves its own post.

120 N. Norton Ave. Undated

Lapl
Already a fan:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=11224

BTW, I know that house. It's a Paul Williams. (1922)
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  #11730  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 12:36 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Alhambra Cinemas in So Cal. More than one? (At least 3!)

“World’s only double bill-single bill theatre”.

Quote:
The theater building, located at the southeast corner of Atlantic Boulevard (originally called Wilson Avenue) and Main Street, included a row of shops with apartments upstairs, fronting on Main Street, with the theater entrance at the east end, farthest from the intersection.

The total seating capacity of this room was probably more than 1,000.

But the most unusual feature of the Alhambra Theatre was a second auditorium, constructed (in 1940) in some of the commercial space adjacent to Main Street, and which was entered from a side passage opened in the side of the main lobby, opposite the concession stand. This second auditorium was called the Annex, and sometimes called the Single Bill Theatre. Double features had become the norm during the depression years, but some people still preferred single features, and The Alhambra accommodated both groups by showing double features in its main auditorium and a single feature in the Annex. (The Annex even had its own, small separate marquee, flat against the wall just west of the main theater marquee.) Declining patronage at movie houses in the 1950’s led to the end of this policy early in that decade, and the Annex was left unused for several years. Still, the theater continued to be listed in the newspapers as the Alhambra & Annex well into the 1960’s, and listings in the Alhambra Post-Advocate newspaper of that period continued to carry the tag line “World’s only double bill-single bill theatre”
. http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/9364
702 W. Main Street, Alhambra
1922 - Lapl

Lapl

1939
Flcikr



731 S. Hill Street, Los Angeles
Lapl

1931 - Hill and Seventh


USC Digital


Evidently there was an Alhambra Theater in San Pedro too.
Lapl
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  #11731  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 12:53 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post
Another stable on Aliso.


lapl

French Bakery right next door to the horse stables! Nice.

A Parisian Bakery at Castelar St. and Ord. Delivery wagon decorated for B.P.O.E. parade.


ebay




Ord St. sign on building





original 1905 photograph with border.

ebay




The photographer's address

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 21, 2013 at 1:06 AM.
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  #11732  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 1:15 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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7th Street Bridge

Quote:
Originally Posted by alester young View Post
I have heard that there is some controversy about these bridges and that some are to be/ have been taken down and replaced. Is the Seventh Street Bridge one of these?
No.

downtown news

http://la.curbed.com/archives/2012/1...blic_space.php
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  #11733  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 2:26 AM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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More 'Frogs' in Sonora Town


Salon Francais, North Broadway, Los Angeles, William H. Fletcher, 1890

The California History Room, California State Library

Looks like a rougher crowd than over at the Parisian bakery.
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  #11734  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 2:41 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post

Salon Francais, North Broadway, Los Angeles, William H. Fletcher, 1890

The California History Room, California State Library

Looks like a rougher crowd than over at the Parisian bakery.


Guessing there wouldn't be much demand for a steam laundry delivery service?

Quote:
Bidart Block, located at 2nd and Main streets in Puente. [La Puente] is recorded to have begun in the 1840s when European settlers arrived at the 48,000 acre Rancho La Puente. The name's history goes back to Gaspar de Portolà's 1769 expedition, when members of the team built a bridge (Puente) over San Jose Creek, during a survey of the land for Spain. In old Spanish, Puente followed the feminine artcle La, whereas nowdays, the noun follows El, hence 'La Puente' instead of El Puente. Lapl
Lapl


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  #11735  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 2:52 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Civility

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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
More 'Frogs' in Sonora Town
Please. Let's not offend everyone in the same week.
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  #11736  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 2:53 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Circa 1890 - Frey's Mantel and Tile House on the corner of Main Street. Overhead wires for street cars, or other utilities, e.g., telegraph, telephone and electricity?

Lapl
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  #11737  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 4:43 AM
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revheavyg revheavyg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by revheavyg View Post
The Rancho Los Amigos Hospital began in the late 1880's as the Los Angeles County Poor Farm located in downey, Ca. The plans and construction of the hospital began in 1887. The hospital opened it's doors to serve the public in 1888. the name was changed to "Rancho Los Amigos" In 1932. The south side of the hospital campus is closed down, but you can visit it, its the size of a small town. There are claims on the internet that it is haunted.
photo-tumblr
photo-flickr
photo-flickr
photo-usc
photo-flickr
inside the auditorium photo-flickr
Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, or Rancho, dates back to 1888 when indigent patients from the Los Angeles County Hospital were relocated to what was then known as the Los Angeles County Poor Farm Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy
photo-google earth
This place is huge!!
heres a video i shot several years ago
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnMCXIdUPZ4
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  #11738  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 5:44 AM
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FredH FredH is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckaluck View Post
Sunset meets Alameda. Late '30s? Maybe the "exit only" sign is one sided? Horseless carriages clearly rule the day.
Lapl
Lucky Lager Alert!


lapl

I did my part to help these guys stay in business back in the 70's
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  #11739  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 2:22 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post
Lucky Lager Alert!
lapl

I did my part to help these guys stay in business back in the 70's
Are you sure you couldn't have tried harder?

As you know, Lucky was brewed locally, in Azusa from '49 through '66. Herman Schultheis, a frequently cited photographer here, was also a fan. Could the look on his face explain the position of the vehicle above?


1955 - Lucky Lager Brewing Facilities
Lapl

1937 - Herman Schultheis presumably at his 6348 Longview Avenue home.
Lapl

Last edited by BifRayRock; Jan 21, 2013 at 3:05 PM.
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  #11740  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 2:24 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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McDonnell's drive-in, Beverly Boulevard (foreground) and La Brea Avenue. Sign for Waikiki restaurant, 335 N. La Brea Avenue.
Lapl

Other McDonnell's "Drive-Inns" were located at Beverly Boulevard & Western Avenue, Wilshire and Robertson boulevards, Yucca Street and Cahuenga Boulevard, Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue, and Sunset Boulevard and La Brea Avenue. The McDonnell's restaurants throughout Los Angeles were:
McDonnell's Monterey (7312 Robertson Boulevard);
McDonnell's Wilshire (Wilshire Bouelvard and La Brea Avenue);
McDonnell's Fairfax (Fairfax Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard);
McDonnell's Gates Hotel (Sixth and Figueroa streets);
McDonnell's Hillstreet (454 S. Hill Street);
McDonnell's Figueroa (4012 S. Figueroa Street);
McDonnell's Adams and Figueroa (2626 S. Figueroa Street); and
McDonnell's Pico Street (Pico and Hope streets). Lapl
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