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  #6281  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2012, 2:49 AM
RudyJK RudyJK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Drugs. Cosmetics. Liquors. Candies. Tobaccos.

All delivered too!

What else does one need?
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  #6282  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2012, 3:24 AM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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A "service station" attendant?
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  #6283  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2012, 4:01 AM
rick m rick m is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I was wondering if any of you have heard of the out of print book....
Tarnished Angels: Paradisiacal turpitude in Los Angeles. by W.W. Robinson, 1964.

I finally found a copy on Amazon.com but the price is $90.00.
Numerous colleges & institutions have it in their collections but none seem to be available online.

It's briefly mentioned in the paper below from California State University Pomona.




http://www.csupomona.edu/~reshaffer/...ple/prostx.htm

My first thought is...what in the sam hell is prophylactic fluid?? Was it something like 'rubber cement'?

The red light districts of Los Angeles haven't been mentioned at all in this thread...yet nothing seems more 'noirish' to me
than a seedy red light district. I thought perhaps 'Tarnished Angels' might open the flood gates.


___
Aha ! Finally this topic gets broached! Almost 10 years back -after encountering a mention somehow at LAPL Central - I sat down in the Rare Books Collection and read through this slim guide- it was contained inside a hollowed out leatherbound volume which I was told was how members of either the California or Jonathan clubs concealed their naughty material from prying eyes at home. Mme. Bollanger, Cora Phillips and the notable Pearl Morton were prime players.L.A.Times historical columnist Cecilia Rasmussen did a great piece on Pearl in the 1990s - Red-maned Belle Watley(Gone With The Wind) was styled after her-Her building was sited where the Justice Bldng now stands-with a fab dancehall upstairs and sumptuous furnishings throughout - Wish I could locate my gathered notes tonite. Pearl eventually departed for San Francisco following trouble from the bluebloods- in her early years she'd take a coachload of her pretty ones down to the Exposition Park Sunday racetrack to flirt and entice the moneyed menfolk - who would avidly speed along on horseback up to her brothel and that of several other established madams. Copies of their brothel tokens can be found on Ebay sometimes. A Senor ballerino owned most of the Calle Los Negros' many cribs- a colorful desperado who would terrorize these humbler commercial women when they were unable to pay his rent increases-Often in the frontpages-Ballerino - the main property owner in the city-finally lost all to his wised-up wife and died rather penniless once she cleaned his clock! Get thee to proquest to read up on Pearl Morton---
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  #6284  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2012, 4:25 AM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...86986&page=152

The city didn't grow quite that fast. L.A. in 1920 had 576,673 residents, according to Boston University .

I love their slogan though. "Grasp the situation."

EDIT: population statistic found at http://physics.bu.edu/~redner/projec...cities/la.html (home page http://physics.bu.edu/)

Last edited by 3940dxer; Feb 2, 2012 at 2:36 AM.
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  #6285  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2012, 3:32 PM
Los Angeles Los Angeles is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post

LAPL
There it is again! The house that I keep wondering who lived in. It is in the south west corner of the park where LACMA now stands. Inquiring minds want to know...well at least this one

Great pictures GW and e_r
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  #6286  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2012, 6:19 PM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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Since it appears to be within the park I'd guess that it was just rest rooms and/or a community center of some kind. Maybe it had once been a residence, before the park was founded?

Or maybe I'm wrong.


http://www.antique-bottles.net/forum/m-298388/tm.htm

Last edited by 3940dxer; Feb 2, 2012 at 12:50 AM.
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  #6287  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 1:12 AM
malumot malumot is offline
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The folks at Garland may have been a tad overly enthusiastic.

But no place in America has ever grown as fast in a thirty year period as Los Angeles did from 1900-1930.*

In 1900 LA County had 170,000. By 1930: 2,208,000. That's 13x.

In 1900 the City of LA had 102,000. By 1930: 1,238,000. That's over 12x.

Not Chicago during the end of the 19th Century. Not Detroit at the beginning of the 20th century, nor Vegas or Phoenix at the end of the 20th. All growth leaders of their respective eras. Yet none of those match L.A.'s rate during that three decade span.


* - Starting with at least 100,000. Obviously mining camps and smaller towns can mushroom quickly, but for an established city to grow so fast in so short a time, no place tops LA.



Boston University?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3940dxer View Post

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...86986&page=152

The city didn't grow quite that fast. L.A. in 1920 had 576,673 residents, according to Boston University .
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  #6288  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 2:19 AM
rick m rick m is offline
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addendum on Pearl Morton,etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by rick m View Post
Aha ! Finally this topic gets broached! Almost 10 years back -after encountering a mention somehow at LAPL Central - I sat down in the Rare Books Collection and read through this slim guide- it was contained inside a hollowed out leatherbound volume which I was told was how members of either the California or Jonathan clubs concealed their naughty material from prying eyes at home. Mme. Bollanger, Cora Phillips and the notable Pearl Morton were prime players.L.A.Times historical columnist Cecilia Rasmussen did a great piece on Pearl in the 1990s - Red-maned Belle Watley(Gone With The Wind) was styled after her-Her building was sited where the Justice Bldng now stands-with a fab dancehall upstairs and sumptuous furnishings throughout - Wish I could locate my gathered notes tonite. Pearl eventually departed for San Francisco following trouble from the bluebloods- in her early years she'd take a coachload of her pretty ones down to the Exposition Park Sunday racetrack to flirt and entice the moneyed menfolk - who would avidly speed along on horseback up to her brothel and that of several other established madams. Copies of their brothel tokens can be found on Ebay sometimes. A Senor ballerino owned most of the Calle Los Negros' many cribs- a colorful desperado who would terrorize these humbler commercial women when they were unable to pay his rent increases-Often in the frontpages-Ballerino - the main property owner in the city-finally lost all to his wised-up wife and died rather penniless once she cleaned his clock! Get thee to proquest to read up on Pearl Morton---
L.A.Times piece on this illustrious woman was run on June 13th,1994 - as L.A.Scene/The City Then and Now ---Glenn will post the image of her Murrietta Bldng bordello soon - as I have no scanner--BTW - brothel tokens date back to ancient Rome--
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  #6289  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 3:10 AM
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Happy Birthday Hollywood, 125 years old today.


[source: KABC-TV]
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  #6290  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 3:25 AM
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I see David found a bottle of Darby's prophylactic fluid. I can not even imagine how that works....eww.
And tokens for a brothel....what did they have...turnstiles?

____

One exquisite building we've mostly passed over on this thread (one mention in a single post) is the old Samson Tire and Rubber Company
building south of downtown at 5675 Telegraph Road in the City of Commerce.

The factory complex was completed in 1930 and sold to The U.S. Tire and Rubber Company in January of 1931.
This explains why the earliest photos I was able to find already have the U.S. Tires signage.


http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/D...wdate=&hidate=





below: A brief history.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/7623944@N03/3888759096/







http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/D...wdate=&hidate=


http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/D...wdate=&hidate=


http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/D...wdate=&hidate=


http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/D...wdate=&hidate=

_______

The Modern Era.


below: The main building at 'magic hour' (Sunset)


can't remember where I found it/still looking




below: Aerial view of the main building. I would love to see that tiny courtyard.....and a vintage office.


google street view





below: The main building with truer colors (not during sunset)*

*correction: I've gone back and looked at other contemporary photos and they all differ from this color scheme.
Perhaps this photo is before a recent paint job. Does anyone know?



unknown




below: The main building photographed from the 5 Freeway (date unknown).


google street view

____



In the 1990s the factory, which had closed in 1978, became the Citadel Outlet Mall.

Five oversized signs have been placed along the 1'750 ft 'Assyrian' wall.

below: This is one of them.


google street view


below: Before the placement of the oversized sign(s), circa 1976.


http://www.learningsites.com/NWPalac...ssyromania.htm


Perhaps the huge signs are a necessary evil to insure success for the mall.
You have to keep in mind that the mall pretty much saved the building from destruction.




below: Sadly, this new signage overpowers the main building (two others are out of view).


google street view



below: Most of you will probably disagree with me, but I like this tower they erected.
For one thing, it's placed back from the historic 'Assyrian' wall....and it also has a 1950s-60s retro look to it (in my opinion).


google street view



below: It reminds me a bit of the Norwalk Square sign from the late 1950s early 60s.


ebay

_____




below: I saved the most noirish photograph to close the post.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/7623944@N03/3888759096/

____

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Feb 2, 2012 at 5:23 AM.
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  #6291  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 3:29 AM
austlar1 austlar1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malumot View Post
The folks at Garland may have been a tad overly enthusiastic.

But no place in America has ever grown as fast in a thirty year period as Los Angeles did from 1900-1930.*

In 1900 LA County had 170,000. By 1930: 2,208,000. That's 13x.

In 1900 the City of LA had 102,000. By 1930: 1,238,000. That's over 12x.

Not Chicago during the end of the 19th Century. Not Detroit at the beginning of the 20th century, nor Vegas or Phoenix at the end of the 20th. All growth leaders of their respective eras. Yet none of those match L.A.'s rate during that three decade span.


* - Starting with at least 100,000. Obviously mining camps and smaller towns can mushroom quickly, but for an established city to grow so fast in so short a time, no place tops LA.



Boston University?
In 1900 NYC had a population of 3,437,202. In 1930 it had a population of 6,930,446. The winner is NYC. This is from Wikipedia link.
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  #6292  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 3:49 AM
malumot malumot is offline
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In percentage terms, my friend. Percentage terms.

I thought that was pretty apparent, what with my references to "rate" and "times growth".

For your benefit I'll try to be more clear next time.

For example, no one thinks of California as a "fast growing" state these days. It grew at roughly the National average (10%) from 2000-2010. Yet it still added nearly 3.4 million people, more than any other state except Texas.


Quote:
Originally Posted by austlar1 View Post
In 1900 NYC had a population of 3,437,202. In 1930 it had a population of 6,930,446. The winner is NYC. This is from Wikipedia link.
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  #6293  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 3:53 AM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I see David found a bottle of Darby's prophylactic fluid. I can not even imagine how that work....eww.
And tokens for a brothel....what did they have...turnstiles?
e_r, the term certainly conjures some awful images but at the risk of bursting your prophylactic bubble, I think that in this context the word only refers to general preventative medicine, and that the bottle would have just contained antiseptic, rubbing alcohol, etc.
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  #6294  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 4:28 AM
austlar1 austlar1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malumot View Post
In percentage terms, my friend. Percentage terms.

I thought that was pretty apparent, what with my references to "rate" and "times growth".

For your benefit I'll try to be more clear next time.

For example, no one thinks of California as a "fast growing" state these days. It grew at roughly the National average (10%) from 2000-2010. Yet it still added nearly 3.4 million people, more than any other state except Texas.
Sorry. I missed your point of reference there. LA is the winner in percentage terms. I have always been impressed with the fact, often overlooked, that NYC actually grew to its present size in the first half of the 20th century. Few realize that in 1900 it was a city the size of LA today in terms of population.
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  #6295  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 5:22 AM
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Here are a couple of photographs from Nov. 12, 1930....the location is 1st & Broadway. The buildings in the background are quite interesting.


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1328159394855







http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1328159394855




below: The 12 story State Building nearing completion in 1931.


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1328159394855




http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1328160833244




below: The photograph that led me to this post.
All you need is someone lighting a cigarette under a light pole......or someone slowly pulling down the blinds in one of the window.


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1328160833244


We've covered the sad demise of this building earlier in the thread. I'll provide a link asap.

____

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Feb 2, 2012 at 5:55 AM.
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  #6296  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 5:40 AM
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Rodger Young Village

As veterans returned to Los Angeles after World War II, many found that there was no housing available for them and their families. To help alleviate this problem, the city of Los Angeles and the federal government joined together to build a temporary community for them in the north east corner of Griffith Park. The area was called Rodger Young Village after a war hero from Ohio. It opened in 1946 and lasted until the mid 1950's.


LAPL

This area of Griffith Park was the site of the Griffith Park Aerodrome, which had been taken over by the National Guard Air Service.


[url]http://www.airfields-http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg13/scaled.php?server=13&filename=grandcentca27julsw.jpg&res=medium

It was directly south of the Grand Central Airport in Glandale


http://www.airfields-freeman.com/CA/...m#grandcentral

Rodger Young Village consisted of 750 Quonset huts, which housed 5,000 people, and provided the families with a kitchen, bathroom, two bedrooms, and a living room.


LAPL


LAPL


LAPL


LAPL

The area before Rodger Young Village: (looking south)


http://www.airfields-http://desmond....jpg&res=medium

The area after (looking south-east)


LAPL

Rodger Young Village was open to veterans of all races:


LAPL

Wikipedia has this nice description of the various groups living together:

"Rodger Young Village was, for a time, the most diverse community in Southern California, as veterans of all races and all branches of the military lived there. This caused problems in some nearby restaurants, which were practicing de facto racial segregation, as next-hut neighbors went to dine together. The influence of RYV residents helped end these practices in a number of establishments"

The village area then:


LAPL

And now:


Google Maps

The area has now been taken over by soccer fields, the L.A. Zoo parking lot, and the 5 and 134 Freeways

Last edited by FredH; Feb 2, 2012 at 5:54 AM.
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  #6297  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 5:45 AM
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles

The 1900 census put the population of L.A. at just over 100,000; the 1910 census put it at just under 320,000. I have read that the growth was due in part to out-migration from San Francisco following the great earthquake and fire and in part to improved rail ties to the east, which made it possible to ship more agricultural products to east coast markets. People from the east also began to move to L. A. for the climate as well.
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  #6298  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 6:22 AM
Fab Fifties Fan Fab Fifties Fan is offline
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Great post on Rodger Young Village FredH!!!

My aunt and uncle (Vern & Edna) lived there from the time it opened until late 1949. They loved living there and only left when Vern re-joined the Marines and was stationed at El Toro in Orange County.

My aunt is 90 now and still talks about their time at RYV and all the life long friends they made. She insists that she had the cutest quonset in the village once she "prettied" it up.

~Jon Paul
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  #6299  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 8:06 AM
malumot malumot is offline
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I hadn't thought about the 1906 Effect but that sure makes sense. Also oil, and let's not forget that newfangled motion picture business, which, indirectly, did the work of a thousand chambers of commerce.

I guess my point behind those census numbers is that they illustrate just how boomy of a boomtown LA was during those first few decades of the 20th century.

It also explains how so much of LA was built in such a slapdash manner during that time. There was some substantial architecture to be sure, but most everything else (e.g. apartment-hotels on Bunker Hill) was mostly thrown up in a "get the money while the gettin's good" fashion. Regular readers of this forum will surely recognize The Sawyer, The Sunshine and The Hillcrest were definitely NOT built for the ages.

Regardless of how nefarious the 1950s CRA was, there's no doubt The Sawyer, Sunshine, et. al. could have possibly survived to the present day. If nothing else Sylmar would have probably taken them out (as it did the State Building).



All just a part of the long narrative......

Quote:
Originally Posted by jg6544 View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles

The 1900 census put the population of L.A. at just over 100,000; the 1910 census put it at just under 320,000. I have read that the growth was due in part to out-migration from San Francisco following the great earthquake and fire and in part to improved rail ties to the east, which made it possible to ship more agricultural products to east coast markets. People from the east also began to move to L. A. for the climate as well.

Last edited by malumot; Feb 2, 2012 at 8:43 AM.
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  #6300  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2012, 8:33 AM
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The Academy Awards are coming up near the end of the month; so, here's some Academy Award-related stuff.

1972, Price Waterhouse is dropping off the nominations lists at the AMPAS headquarters, then located in a converted old movie theater building at 9038 Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood. After a brand new, considerably larger headquarters building was built and opened in late 1975 in Beverly Hills on Wilshire Boulevard, the old headquarters building was demolished.

LIFE images

Originally a neighborhood cinema called the Marquis Theatre, it was built in 1925. In 1946, after having rented different offices in Hollywood, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences bought the old Marquis Theater and made it its headquarters building, using the theater for Academy screenings.

In early 1949, the Academy was in a crisis; after years of having the awards ceremonies subsidized by the movie studios, the studios decided to tighten their belts, being that in 1948, the Supreme Court told the major studios that they couldn't own their own movie theater chains without violating antitrust laws. Plus, this was the era of the rise of television; more people were staying home and not going to the movies, and the movie studios were taking a hit in profits; the studios, then, were not going to fund the Academy Awards ceremony. So, the Academy President at the time, Jean Hersholt, decided to hold the awards ceremonies at the Academy's own screening theater---which only seated 950. The awards ceremonies for the previous 2 years had been held at the Shrine Auditorium, which seated 6,700 at the time. So naturally, many Academy members were miffed that many could not attend the awards ceremony. This was the only time that the Academy's own screening theater would be the venue for the Oscars.

Oscar night, Academy Theater, March 24, 1949, honoring achievements in film for 1948. This was back when the Oscars was still an industry-only event (though the ceremonies were broadcast on radio), before TV and the ridiculous focus of red carpet arrivals, and before all the international press coverage. However, during WWII, the Academy did invite some members of the military to attend, and in 1947-1948, when the Oscars were held at the Shrine Auditorium, in an effort to fill all the seats, the Academy sold tickets to the general public, to the chagrin of some Academy members. The Oscars are still invitation-only, but its being a live televised show has added the dynamic of having to play to the TV viewer.

And this was back when the Oscars was a true, after-twilight, evening affair, when evening wear is supposed to be worn. There's something I find tacky about wearing evening clothes while the sun is still out at 3 in the afternoon, like today's Oscar arrivals.

LIFE images


LIFE images

The fans in the bleachers.

LIFE images


LIFE images

Agnes Moorehead being interviewed on KFWB radio (AM 980). She was up for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her role in "Johnny Belinda." She lost to Claire Trevor in "Key Largo."

LIFE images

Best Actress nominee (for her role in "Johnny Belinda") Jane Wyman arriving. She won.

LIFE images


LIFE images

Gregory Peck.

LIFE images

Jane Russell in the lobby. She performed one of the songs nominated for Best Original Song, "Buttons and Bows" from the film "The Paleface."

LIFE images

The stage.

oscars.org


LIFE images

The lighting crew and newsreel people up in the balcony.

LIFE images


LIFE images

Some of the winners backstage with the press.

LIFE images
__________________
"If the climate were a bank, the U.S. would have already saved it."

---Hugo Chávez

Last edited by sopas ej; Feb 2, 2012 at 2:29 PM.
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