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  #61  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 9:43 PM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Originally Posted by bossabreezes View Post
The US could fit a lot more people in it, but I think it would be detrimental to have a population of over 500M.

Even though some cities in the US are urbanizing due to free market, the government of most cities in the US is very behind on keeping up on infrastructure. This will end up lowering the quality of life for everyone, and cost of living will become even more difficult in the largest cities.

Also, back to the original question: Asian Immigration. From what I can see, crudely based off of my own two eyes, Indian Immigration in the NYC metro region is extremely high. Most of the time on transit, the passengers are 85% Indian. NYC metro area is definitely becoming Indian faster than any other kind of East Asian, I think that flow has slowed down significantly in the past decade and has been taken over by Indian and South Asian immigrants. Same goes for the Philadelphia metro region, there are Indian ethnoburbs forming all over the place.
I does seem that East Asian immigration may slowing down but South Asian immigration is increasing.

What impact will the cancellation of Amazon in Long Island City in Queens have when a lot of the growth is connected to H1b Tech visas?


I posted these statistics on NYC earlier. The Bay Area's S Asian population is almost exclusively Indian. While NYC has a lot more people from other parts of S. Asia.

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Originally Posted by RST500 View Post
Stats from 2013-2017 per the department of homeland security website. This is a comparison of the NY MSA vs. the SF/SJ CSA combined.

2017

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 7,822
India - 9,551
Nepal - 1,197
Pakistan - 4,153
Sri Lanka - 349
Total - 23,072

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 183
India - 5,253
Nepal - 582
Pakistan - 593
Sri Lanka - 82
Total - 6,693

2016

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 10,159
India - 10,768
Nepal - 1,458
Pakistan - 4,910
Sri Lanka - 401
Total - 27,696

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 194
India - 5,536
Nepal - 660
Pakistan - 691
Sri Lanka - 97
Total - 7,178

2015

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 7,540
India - 9,980
Nepal - 1,311
Pakistan - 4,462
Sri Lanka - 352
Total - 23,645

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 155
India - 6,099
Nepal - 565
Pakistan - 634
Sri Lanka - 106
Total - 7,559

2014

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 8,038
India - 12,350
Nepal - 1,285
Pakistan - 4,800
Sri Lanka - 388
Total - 26,861

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 154
India - 7,810
Nepal - 556
Pakistan - 550
Sri Lanka - 96
Total - 9,166

2013

NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 6,010
India - 10,818
Nepal - 1,358
Pakistan - 3,121
Sri Lanka - 417
Total- 21,724

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 121
India - 6,831
Nepal - 625
Pakistan - 504
Sri Lanka - 86
Total - 8,167

Combined 5 Year total



NY MSA:

Bangladesh - 39,569
India - 53,467
Nepal - 6,609
Pakistan - 21,446
Sri Lanka - 1,907
Total - 122,998

SF/SJ CSA:

Bangladesh - 807
India - 31,529
Nepal - 2,988
Pakistan - 2,972
Sri Lanka - 467
Total - 38,763
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  #62  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2019, 11:04 PM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is online now
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I assume you live in Central NJ, which, yes, has Indian-dominated areas. But I can't imagine that 85% of people on any NJ Transit route are Indian, or South Asian.
I actually live in the city, but visit Central NJ often for work as we have an office there. Middlesex county, NJ may soon be majority Indian or South Asian. In 2010, Indians were already about 15% of the county's population (around 850,000 people). It's probably doubled or tripled since then.

If you work in FiDi, you'll notice a huge recently arrived Indian working population as well, mainly in programming/engineering.
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  #63  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2019, 8:39 PM
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New York also has a lot more non-India South Asians which California doesn't really have. Bangladesh is one of the fastest growing new immigrant groups.
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  #64  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 2:56 AM
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The Bangladeshi population is exploding in NYC. Probably the most visible Asian minority these days after Chinese. Remarkable growth.
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  #65  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 10:56 PM
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Originally Posted by RST500 View Post
New York also has a lot more non-India South Asians which California doesn't really have. Bangladesh is one of the fastest growing new immigrant groups.
The Bangladeshi population in California is indeed small; however, as of 2015, the Los Angeles Metro Area has the most Bangladeshis on the west coast, and ranks number 5 in the top 10 US metro areas with the most Bangladeshis, according to this: https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/fact...is-in-the-u-s/

I believe Los Angeles has one of the highest concentrations of Sri Lankans living in the US, probably 2nd only to NYC.
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Last edited by sopas ej; Nov 6, 2019 at 11:09 PM.
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  #66  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2019, 11:46 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
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I expect Asian immigration to increase actually
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  #67  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2019, 12:59 AM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
The Bangladeshi population in California is indeed small; however, as of 2015, the Los Angeles Metro Area has the most Bangladeshis on the west coast, and ranks number 5 in the top 10 US metro areas with the most Bangladeshis, according to this: https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/fact...is-in-the-u-s/

I believe Los Angeles has one of the highest concentrations of Sri Lankans living in the US, probably 2nd only to NYC.
There's a Little Bangladesh in LA near Koreatown but the community is still very small. The area is mostly Korean and Central American.
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  #68  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2019, 1:06 PM
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Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
So essentially what you're saying is, homogeneity is good; diversity is bad.
I any event, even if humanity became "one brown androgynous blob" it wouldn't take long before we developed other ways to divide ourselves that simply differ from the historic ones.
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  #69  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2019, 1:40 PM
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I don't foresee it peaking any time soon. There have been a new & rapidly growing wave of immigrants from Burma, Nepal and Bangladesh and the number of people migrating to the US from places like India, China, Vietnam & the Philippines have been stable.
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  #70  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2019, 6:29 PM
edale edale is offline
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There's a Little Bangladesh in LA near Koreatown but the community is still very small. The area is mostly Korean and Central American.
Fun fact: Koreatown is the hub of the Oaxacan community in LA. Mexicans are still the largest ethnic group in Koreatown/Little Bangladesh, contrary to the names of these neighborhoods, and the majority of them are from Oaxaca.

I'm actually a bit curious how neighborhoods receive these ethnic enclave designations. Obviously it makes sense in places like Koreatown or Chinatown, where the population of people from those countries are very visible, but how about in places like Little Bangladesh? There is a verrrrry tiny community of Bangladeshis there- way fewer than other ethnic groups that live there- yet the neighborhood gets called Little Bangladesh? Other than a small, spread out collection of restaurants, there is nothing that would signify that you're in a Bangladeshi neighborhood.

Closer to where I live, there's a sign calling a section of Los Feliz/Silver Lake "Little Lithuania" (https://www.google.com/maps/@34.1085...7i13312!8i6656) . There is a Lithuanian Catholic Church (St. Cassimer), but other than that, literally no sign of an ethnic community at all. No restaurants, no stores...nothing but the church. That's enough to constitute a Little Lithuania? Come on.
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  #71  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2019, 7:11 PM
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Fun fact: Koreatown is the hub of the Oaxacan community in LA. Mexicans are still the largest ethnic group in Koreatown/Little Bangladesh, contrary to the names of these neighborhoods, and the majority of them are from Oaxaca.

I'm actually a bit curious how neighborhoods receive these ethnic enclave designations. Obviously it makes sense in places like Koreatown or Chinatown, where the population of people from those countries are very visible, but how about in places like Little Bangladesh? There is a verrrrry tiny community of Bangladeshis there- way fewer than other ethnic groups that live there- yet the neighborhood gets called Little Bangladesh? Other than a small, spread out collection of restaurants, there is nothing that would signify that you're in a Bangladeshi neighborhood.

Closer to where I live, there's a sign calling a section of Los Feliz/Silver Lake "Little Lithuania" (https://www.google.com/maps/@34.1085...7i13312!8i6656) . There is a Lithuanian Catholic Church (St. Cassimer), but other than that, literally no sign of an ethnic community at all. No restaurants, no stores...nothing but the church. That's enough to constitute a Little Lithuania? Come on.
I believe residents/business owners or whoever, just need to lobby the LA City Council, and if approved, the official designation takes place, and neighborhood/district signs are installed. Here's an article about Little Bangladesh: https://www.courthousenews.com/in-la...kes-its-claim/

Koreatown got its designation in the 1970s; during that period, and through the 1980s and into the 1990s, it seemed pretty much known that Koreatown was basically a bunch of Korean/Korean-owned businesses, with not very many Koreans living there. I guess the Korean population has grown there, but in the beginning, Koreatown was more about a place with a lot of Korean businesses, though of course historically, LA has had Korean residents from very early on.
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  #72  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 1:57 AM
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Secondary immigration is what drives up immigration from Asian countries.
Immigrants get visas/green card, become citizens over time. Then they can sponsor green cards for their family members.
Spouse/children (child/adults)
Parents
Siblings and their family

Then the cycle starts again where once they become citizens, they can sponsor their family. So a Brother in Law , married to your sister can sponsor his parents and siblings.

Strong economic countries where the people are near economically equal with the US like Japan, Singapore for example (maybe south korea), will less likely send as many people to the US thus having lesser secondary immigration.

Poorer and developing countries will likely have higher secondary immigrants as a way to escape poverty and have better chances in life for themselves and their entire generational family.
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  #73  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 4:41 PM
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Secondary immigration is what drives up immigration from Asian countries.
Immigrants get visas/green card, become citizens over time. Then they can sponsor green cards for their family members.
Spouse/children (child/adults)
Parents
Siblings and their family

Then the cycle starts again where once they become citizens, they can sponsor their family. So a Brother in Law , married to your sister can sponsor his parents and siblings.

Strong economic countries where the people are near economically equal with the US like Japan, Singapore for example (maybe south korea), will less likely send as many people to the US thus having lesser secondary immigration.

Poorer and developing countries will likely have higher secondary immigrants as a way to escape poverty and have better chances in life for themselves and their entire generational family.
It can take a long time, depending on the country a person is emigrating from, though. I don't think many Americans know how long it actually takes for many immigrants to become American citizens.

This is just an anecdote, but, it took my aunt nearly 20 years from the time my mom started sponsoring her, to the time she became a citizen.

In 1977, my mom started the process of sponsoring her sister/my aunt, who was a pharmacist in the Philippines. My aunt did not get her green card until 1989, and that is when she entered the US. She became a citizen in 1996, after having to wait 7 years from the time she got her green card.

Whereas I can convert to Judaism, have that certified by a rabbi, move to Israel, and become an Israeli citizen within a few years... right?

Again, I don't think people realize how long it takes for many immigrants to enter the US legally and become citizens.
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  #74  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 7:42 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
It can take a long time, depending on the country a person is emigrating from, though. I don't think many Americans know how long it actually takes for many immigrants to become American citizens.

This is just an anecdote, but, it took my aunt nearly 20 years from the time my mom started sponsoring her, to the time she became a citizen.

In 1977, my mom started the process of sponsoring her sister/my aunt, who was a pharmacist in the Philippines. My aunt did not get her green card until 1989, and that is when she entered the US. She became a citizen in 1996, after having to wait 7 years from the time she got her green card.

Whereas I can convert to Judaism, have that certified by a rabbi, move to Israel, and become an Israeli citizen within a few years... right?

Again, I don't think people realize how long it takes for many immigrants to enter the US legally and become citizens.
I think some do, and that's why we see the insane unfairness of legalizing 12 million people because of politics.
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  #75  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2019, 7:45 PM
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I think some do, and that's why we see the insane unfairness of legalizing 12 million people because of politics.
There is nothing remotely "unfair" about legalizing longtime American residents who have done everything right, and could never come via family visa anyways. There was bipartisan support for the Dreamers until the Trump nightmare.

And the ridiculousness and trolling delays and 10x increase in cost for legal immigrants came in recent years, long after the Dreamers. It used to cost almost nothing in time and money to bring someone over; now it's very hard to do for less than 10k-15k and maybe five years, and very high odds of neverending limbo. Basically the U.S. wants everyone else to go the hell away, thanks to a proto-fascist Stephen Miller controlling immigration policy.
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  #76  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 4:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
There is nothing remotely "unfair" about legalizing longtime American residents who have done everything right, and could never come via family visa anyways. There was bipartisan support for the Dreamers until the Trump nightmare.

And the ridiculousness and trolling delays and 10x increase in cost for legal immigrants came in recent years, long after the Dreamers. It used to cost almost nothing in time and money to bring someone over; now it's very hard to do for less than 10k-15k and maybe five years, and very high odds of neverending limbo. Basically the U.S. wants everyone else to go the hell away, thanks to a proto-fascist Stephen Miller controlling immigration policy.
Tell that to the million of people waiting for their slot. I understand there’s millions of people all ready here doing the right thing. Also living a better life by liberal fiat that directly increases environmental drivers (people)?

Your dangerous assertion rings open order, as it is completely fair as you say it for them to just come and live here as law abiding persons. This celebratory quip as you might see it actual means all humans who wish to come here and do right, ignore the border or US immigration law. Much thanks for the 100’s of millions that just might take you up on that. And with them coming in rapidly, in such large numbers in a multicultural fashion, it would be xenophobic to tell 50 million men from women lesser countries to give up certain ways of living they are accustomed to. Familial abuse, child abuse and aversions to civil rights laws deemed antiquated.

You can have your paradise of living in a country where people can enter at will by the 100’s of billions. Bet you like 10 million Samalese moving to your city within 5 years.
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  #77  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 6:12 AM
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I'd love to see a big increase in immigration, particularly in my city and neighborhood.

Actually it's happening. Mostly since we're the top tech downtown (Amazon etc.), we're getting good numbers.
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  #78  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2019, 3:11 PM
bossabreezes bossabreezes is online now
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Unfortunately nowadays we see gross disregard for law and general loving of impunity. I'm all for immigration, I did it myself, but it must be done within the limits of the law.

Also, flood-gate style immigration is not good for anyone. The left tends to fetishize it, but this comes from complete misunderstanding and disregard for order. What else is new?
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  #79  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2019, 12:57 AM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
There is nothing remotely "unfair" about legalizing longtime American residents who have done everything right, and could never come via family visa anyways. There was bipartisan support for the Dreamers until the Trump nightmare.

And the ridiculousness and trolling delays and 10x increase in cost for legal immigrants came in recent years, long after the Dreamers. It used to cost almost nothing in time and money to bring someone over; now it's very hard to do for less than 10k-15k and maybe five years, and very high odds of neverending limbo. Basically the U.S. wants everyone else to go the hell away, thanks to a proto-fascist Stephen Miller controlling immigration policy.
Yes, our immigration issues started 36 months ago. Before that it was never an issue.
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  #80  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2019, 12:35 AM
RST500 RST500 is offline
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
I believe residents/business owners or whoever, just need to lobby the LA City Council, and if approved, the official designation takes place, and neighborhood/district signs are installed. Here's an article about Little Bangladesh: https://www.courthousenews.com/in-la...kes-its-claim/

Koreatown got its designation in the 1970s; during that period, and through the 1980s and into the 1990s, it seemed pretty much known that Koreatown was basically a bunch of Korean/Korean-owned businesses, with not very many Koreans living there. I guess the Korean population has grown there, but in the beginning, Koreatown was more about a place with a lot of Korean businesses, though of course historically, LA has had Korean residents from very early on.

https://www.kcet.org/socal-focus/la-...-asian-america


"According to the report, in the last decade, the Asian American population of L.A. County grew 20 percent, and the Pacific Islander population grew nine percent, even though the total county population grew only three percent. In contrast, the growth rate for the Latino population was 11 percent, and both the white and African American populations shrank, with decreases of eight and five percent, respectively."


"Bangladeshi Americans are the Asian ethnic group with the highest rate of growth, with a 122 percent increase in population in the past decade. Other South Asian ethnic groups, such as Pakistani, Sri Lankan, and Indian Americans experienced high growth rates in L.A. County as well. Japanese Americans had the least highest growth rate (one percent), but also the highest domestic-born population (70 percent) and the highest percentage of senior citizens (19 percent). The fastest-growing Pacific Islander ethnic group are Fijian Americans, with a growth rate of 68 percent."
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