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  #32221  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 5:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
That might be a flume carrying water to the big tank. The map below appears to show the flume,
along with what I guess is Woolen Mill Creek in the little ravine immediately south of the mill.




1875 Map of Canal and Reservoir Company Land @ Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/12985/rec/11

Chapulín is Spanish for Grasshopper.
The water from the area of Echo Park Lake came down to power the woolen mill and also because wool has to be washed a lot before it is spun, it would take a lot of water. The name "woolen mill tract" remains to this day in the property descriptions which are filed with the County Assessor's office.
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  #32222  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 6:00 PM
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Hello Lorendoc,

I would be interested in more information regarding Larry Potter and the Jade. Would you be able to send me excerpts from the FBI file as it relates to this?

Thanks!
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  #32223  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 6:51 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldstuff View Post
The water from the area of Echo Park Lake came down to power the woolen mill and also because wool has to be washed a lot before it is spun, it would take a lot of water. The name "woolen mill tract" remains to this day in the property descriptions which are filed with the County Assessor's office.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
The mill must be just out of shot to the right in this post-1886 view (I think the attendant sheds are just in view though). I kept missing it:

lapl/wm henry fletcher, n.d.

Note the little arroyo (behind the dark house in the center foreground at the NW corner of 5th and Flower), which carried Los Reyes and the waste water away from the mill (the waste water was piped under what-was-then Pearl Street before being, once again, exposed to the air) as shown on the plat map posted by FW. Note that the water was piped under Flower St too.
__
The structure, south of the mill, with the tank:

lapl (detail from top image)


.

Last edited by tovangar2; Nov 25, 2015 at 5:18 AM. Reason: add detail image
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  #32224  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 7:52 PM
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Right angles

Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
Here's a better look at the auditorium.
After this stretch of Julius Shulman provided by Hoss, I eventually happened to think : J.S. is the Piet Mondrian of the photography.
In the noirish background, this looks more « Kiss Me Deadly » than « Double Indemnity ».
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Last edited by AlvaroLegido; Nov 24, 2015 at 9:36 PM.
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  #32225  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 8:08 PM
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I can't find any previous mentions of today's Julius Shulman subject, the El Greco Apartments at 1028 Tiverton Avenue in Westwood Village. Just like Echo Park Court, these apartments were photographed to appear in 'Courtyard Housing in Los Angeles' (pages 116-117 for anyone who has a copy). Another note says that photography credit should go to Carlos von Frankenberg. This is "Job 5659: F. Pierpont and Walter S. Davis, El Greco Apartments (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1979".





And here are a couple of shots of the courtyard and central fish pond.





All from Getty Research Institute

This is the new El Greco Apartments at 1030 Tiverton Avenue.


GSV

But that's not the end of the story. The original El Greco Apartments are alive and well, and living at 817 N Hayworth Avenue. The following is slightly abridged from Wikipedia:
The Spanish-Mediterranean style El Greco was built from 1929 to 1930 and was one of the original buildings in Westwood Village. The two-story, 12-unit structure was designed by architect Clara Bertram Humphrey, and modeled after the home of artist El Greco in Toledo, Spain. The structure is credited with having strongly influenced the architectural style of Westwood Village, with its elegant, Spanish-style buildings. The red tile roof and brick courtyard of the El Greco became a trend that was followed in many other structures in Westwood Village.

Once located in the heart of Westwood Village, the El Greco was the first hotel in Westwood Village and was reportedly the home to international film personalities, including Erich von Stroheim, Michael Curtiz, and Joel McCrea.

By the end of the 1970s, many of the old Spanish-Mediterranean style buildings in Westwood Village had been replaced with high-rises. Accordingly, controversy arose when the owner of the El Greco announced plans in 1979 to demolish the structure and replace it with condominiums. Tenants of the old building, who were served with 60-day notices to vacate, led the preservation effort. Tenants including Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy and James Davidson, with assistances from City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky, led an effort to have the building declared a historic monument by the city's Cultural Heritage Board. In February 1980, the building was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument (#231), putting demolition plans on hold.

In September 1985, the El Greco was carefully carved into four pieces and hauled from its original site in Westwood to its new location in the Beverly-Fairfax district.

The relocated El Greco opened in December 1986 as housing for senior citizens.

GSV
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  #32226  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 10:41 PM
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Los Angeles Times Photographs Collection

Title: "Artist and restorer Alver Regli sitting in front of a painting he's restoring in Los Angeles, Calif., 1931"

Access to this collection is generously supported by Arcadia funds.,

Department of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA. Coverage Los Angeles (Calif.)


Last edited by mdiederi; Nov 24, 2015 at 11:16 PM.
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  #32227  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 1:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Looking north at the woolen mill, 1876.


UCLA -- http://lit250v.library.ucla.edu/isla.../laviews%3A142
I happened across this brief description of the woolen mills on Pearl Street.

found under the heading "Manufacturers (1871-1880)"

"History of Los Angeles County" copyright 1880. https://archive.org/details/historyoflosange00wils

In this description 'ditches' are used to transport the water. -no mention yet of the elevated flume visible in FW's photograph above.
__
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  #32228  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 1:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post

I'm guessing that the trestle delivered water to a wheel to power the mill to spin the wool (?) I can't quite work that out.
LOL, the technology is lost on me.

Los Reyes and a ditch following the canyon of this arroyo down to Pearl street, now Figueroa, was constructed.
This zanja in later years was known as the Woolen Mill ditch.
"delivered water to a wheel to power the mill"

"Los Reyes and a ditch following the canyon of this arroyo down to Pearl street"


So you were correct on both accounts t2.
__
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  #32229  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 2:50 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Woolen Mill on Grasshopper/Pearl/Figueroa at 5th

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I happened across this brief description of the woolen mills on Pearl Street.

found under the heading "Manufacturers (1871-1880)"

"History of Los Angeles County" copyright 1880. https://archive.org/details/historyoflosange00wils
__
Thx e_r. I knew the Bernard Bros first operated the mill (but not anything else about them). I never heard of Torr and Horner or the "several parties" that were unsuccessful. There's always more to know.

"In the autumn of 1873, Barnard Brothers set in operation the first woolen mill here, built in 1868 or 1869 by George
Hansen and his associates in the Canal and Reservoir Company. It was located on the ditch along the canon of the
Arroyo de Los Reyes now Figueroa Street; and for fifteen years or more was operated by the Barnards and the Coulters,
after which it was turned into an ice factory. "

-"Sixty Years in Southern California"/Harris Newmark, pg 450


(Geo Hanson was a surveyor who came to LA in 1850. He was president of the Los Angeles Reservoir and Canal Company)


"Reverend Coulter, father of Frank M. Coulter, brought his family to Los Angeles on September 17th, 1877, and after a short association in the hardware firm of Harper & Coulter, he entered the dry goods field as B. F. Coulter, now the Coulter Dry Goods Company. In 1878, Coulter bought the woolen mills on Pearl Street near Fifth."
"Sixty Years in Southern California"/Harris Newmark, pg 511

Last edited by tovangar2; Dec 2, 2015 at 11:20 PM. Reason: add Newmark quotes
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  #32230  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 2:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverlaker View Post
I was delighted to see this picture of the old German church. Went there a few times in the 70s/early 80s with my grandfather as they still had a German language service there on Sundays. I wish I had brought my camera and taken photos of the inside and the stained glass windows! It was kind of a dodgy area then and the front smelled like urine sometimes, but inside was really cool and moody.
Thanks so much for sharing your memories with us Silverlaker.

What would you say if I could take you someplace to see those same stained windows you saw with your grandfather?


eBay / detail


You see, earlier this evening, I happened across this rather touching article from the Los Angeles Times [c.1988].
Towards the end of the article it mentions that the stained glass windows and pews (and even the pipe organ) were going to be put into storage
until a new home is found.






http://articles.latimes.com/1988-08-...3_1_high-notes


Well it turns out the new home of the German church is just north of downtown Los Angeles in Glendale..

But my heart sank when I saw that every wall of the new church is curved. (how could the old stained glass fit into this design?)


google_earth


street view

gsv


But take a closer look at this window.




That certainly looks like one of the old stained glass window from the German Methodist church on Olive Street!





After a half hour or so of googling I finally found an interior view and it's quite stunning! -it's actually mounted a foot or so away from the outer window.


http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/chris...le/Interesting







But this needs more research:
Are the pews also from the Olive street church?
What about the 1,000 pipe pipe organ? Was it saved?
And I'm not sure if there are two or three separate vintage windows at the Glendale site. (there are two different images of Jesus)

Also, one of the 'old' windows has "Look Up. Lift Up" written in English (see below).


http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/chris...le/Interesting

Why isn't this in German?

detail


-not sure what the large E and L stand for.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 25, 2015 at 5:07 PM.
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  #32231  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 5:49 PM
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I've typed "Strathmore" numerous times (diff. variations) into the search function; surprisingly 'no results' were found.
-and yet the apartment building looks very familiar.

Perhaps we've seen it by a different name?


eBay

-note the three xs on three windows on the second floor of the apt. bldg.

Anyone recognize the church next door?

_

just for fun, here it is enlarged.



the cross on the church appears to have a large 'crown'.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 25, 2015 at 6:06 PM.
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  #32232  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 6:04 PM
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The church looks very different, but the old Strathmore apartment building is still standing (minus a few details) at 910 S Grand View Street.


GSV
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  #32233  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 6:07 PM
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That's it! thanks Hoss.

I wonder if the old church is under that major make-over? (I doubt it)
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  #32234  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 7:25 PM
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The church seems to be the Grand View (or Grandview) Baptist Church, and the number on the front is clearly 914, but I'm having trouble finding extra information.


GSV

Looking at Historic Aerials, the old church building is visible up until 2005. This July 2007 GSV image shows the new building under construction. Sadly, I doubt if much of the original is in there.


GSV
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  #32235  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 7:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post


The church seems to be the Grand View (or Grandview) Baptist Church, and the number on the front is clearly 914, but I'm having trouble finding extra information.



Looking at Historic Aerials, the old church building is visible up until 2005. This July 2007 GSV image shows the new building under construction. Sadly, I doubt if much of the original is in there.


I believe this church is Korean and appears to be standing behind a fortress of fences and locked gates. There's no sign on the building and Internet information is well hidden from the public. I think they have another church building nearby.
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  #32236  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 7:59 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Strathmore Apartments / Westlake Presbyterian Church

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post


eBay

Anyone recognize the church next door?

The Westlake Presbyterian church went up in late 1909 (it cost $25K on a $7K lot). The Strathmore Apartments were built in late 1910.

Baist 1914, plate No. 15:

historic mapworks (detail)

These two buildings are just across W 9th St (James M Woods Blvd) from the Susana Machado Bernard home and barn.



This murky image is the only photo I could find of the church:

cdnc / Los Angeles Herald , 19 February 1910

The accompanying article, re the church's 1910 dedication, is here


Los Angeles Herald, 12 July 1915:

cdnc





___

Last edited by tovangar2; Nov 25, 2015 at 8:14 PM. Reason: SMB house + barn
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  #32237  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 8:20 PM
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Thanks for digging up this information tovanger2-& for posting that Baist map detail. -very interesting.

_
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  #32238  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 9:05 PM
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"Unidentified man walking in downtown Los Angeles" (1940s?)


eBay

Behind him you can see the entrance marquee to Desmond's Dept. Store (616 S. Broadway).



...and today.


gsv

The old Desmond's marquee is still in place, and in good shape.

I just noticed the circle with 618 used to have an architectural element in that spot (look at the vintage pic again)

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 25, 2015 at 9:24 PM.
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  #32239  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 9:13 PM
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Just a quick Julius Shulman post today. The index numbers on these photos suggest that the original set may have been bigger, but all we have is the three I'm posting here. These wonderful shots of the Los Angeles Convention Center were taken in 1971, the year it opened. It's "Job 4775: Charles Luckman Associates, Los Angeles Convention Center (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1971".





And finally, an interior shot.



All from Getty Research Institute
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  #32240  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 9:31 PM
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