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  #41981  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 12:19 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post

I wrote to the WGA to ask if they have a timeline on the old "Marquise".

I'd be interested to know when the seating was changed out to the big, green chairs. That was the most comfortable seating ever.

Thanks, yes, let us know if you hear anything!
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  #41982  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 1:09 AM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Thanks for this GW. We needed a shot of noir.


I thought I had found Philip Kilfoil's son (also named Philip).
If I have the right person, he attended Oneonta Military Academy in South Pasadena and later played football for USC.

But then I started getting all confused and decided I couldn't prove it was the killer's son.


Philip Kilfoil's brother John--who lived at 517 Rosemont née Casco ca 1915--had a son named Philip b ca 1906...



A little more on the family from the LAT Jan 14, 1914



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  #41983  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 1:10 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm View Post
You would only have been making for the island platform nearest you, thus only having to cross one slow-moving lane of traffic. These outside lanes in either direction were probably intended just for very local traffic, rather than anyone intending to drive several miles or, for that matter, several blocks. Much of Santa Monica Boulevard between Westwood and Beverly Hills has recently been reconfigured in a very similar way, and it works quite well.
I feel the need to step in on this discussion. Having stood in those safety zones on many occations waiting for a Red Car I never felt unsafe. Drivers then were much more cautious than today. Yes people occasionally got hit, but it seams like today every night the news is telling me there was another hit and run. Drivers today don't care about anybody but themself.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #41984  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 1:29 AM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie View Post
Hmm...well...I know it was featured on FaceOff: http://www.redesignrevolution.com/re...ranean-terror/
It was also used on an episode for NCIS LA

Paul C. Koehler
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  #41985  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 2:54 AM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Rod at the left and mystery man at the right. Same person? The nose, lips and ears are different....very different.


NYTimes
From the Shorpy entry for the man on the right:

April 1958. "Hubert Leslie, human guinea pig for medical experiments (also an artist known as 'Hube the Cube'), one of the 'Beatnik' community of San Francis­co's North Beach district." 35mm negative from photos by Cal Bernstein for the Look magazine assignment "The Bored, the Bearded and the Beat."

Cheers,

Earl
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  #41986  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 3:00 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyB View Post
I've recently become educated about this regrettable chapter of American history (my wife is executive director of an organization that is producing a play based on the life of an internment survivor) and it is not a pretty story. I think the woman in the black hat's expression kind of sums it up.
I found the photograph rather unsettling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyB
These are American citizens, some of them second- and third-generation business owners returning to foreclosed properties.
Here's a rather touching going out of business sign in Los Angeles' Little Tokyo. [April 11, 1942]


https://www.archives.gov/files/educa...k-you-note.gif



A store for rent in Little Tokyo after residents of Japanese ancestry were instructed to evacuate. [also April 11, 1942]


http://oac.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/ft2t1nb1dq/?brand=oac4

According to historians, over 1/3 of internees relocated to new areas after the war after being released. Many former Los Angelenos chose to re-locate elsewhere, like the Midwest
but many more returned to Little Tokyo and eventually reopened their shops.


All-Seeing-Eye

detail

__
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  #41987  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 3:39 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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I believe this kodachrome photograph of Tiny Naylor's is new to NLA, but I could be wrong.


https://www.facebook.com/VintageLosA...type=1&theater

At first I thought it had just rained, but then I noticed the hose.

My favorite part of the photo are the big houses still standing on La Brea Avenue.



just for fun...here's a closer look.


detail



and I like this older gentleman selling the Mirror..








this one's a bit younger.


[1950] http://thenewloverofbeauty.tumblr.co...er-los-angeles

"Death Strikes Mother, Los Angeles" (1950) by Ida Wyman

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 21, 2017 at 3:51 AM.
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  #41988  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 6:43 AM
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Burlington Apartments @ 1723 W. James M. Wood Blvd.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
'mystery' fire. [1959]








Check out all three photos here:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-VINTAGE-8X...AAAOSwB-1Yrejv

The above photo was taken April 13, 1959, and shows the Burlington Apts. at the NE corner of Burlington and James M. Wood Blvd.
(then called 9th St.). The columns at the entrance are still there, behind the security bars:






Both Jan 2017 GSV


There was an earlier post on the Burlington, but all the images are gone.

Here's the Burlington in a 1915 advertisement. It's unfortunate that the porch along Burlington hasn't survived:



Internet Archive


The lobby, from the same advertisement:



Internet Archive


This fairly recent photo might show the remodeled lobby from the opposite direction:



Commercialsearch.com


The Burlington was built during 1906-07. The article below also appears in the January 6, 1907, LA Herald,
where there's an illustration of what the building will look like, but it doesn't show very well:



December 16, 1906, LA Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


I don't know if the Burlington had opened yet when this occurred (Murphey [sic] is listed as the building's owner
in the previous article):



June 16, 1907, LA Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


Anyway, that brings us back to e_r's photo and the April 14, 1959, LA Times:



ProQuest via LAPL


Either the building got uncondemmed, or that part of the story was wrong. There is a pre-fire, March 2, 1959, building permit for
a parapet correction at 1723 W. 9th. Here's the April 27, 1959, BP for the fire damage (there are also BPs dated May 11, 1959, to
"replace roof and ceiling on approx 80% of roof area," and July 21, 1959, for "framing around elevator openings and penthouse"):



LADBS

Last edited by Flyingwedge; May 23, 2017 at 8:53 PM. Reason: replace and relink 1915 exterior photo, which for some reason stopped displaying -- probably a Photobucket issue
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  #41989  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 4:51 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
The above postcard image is the only glimpse of the interior of Sardi's I recall seeing posted before. Here's a couple others:

HHP

Opened at 6315 Hollywood Blvd in 1932.

LAPL

Owner Adolph “Eddie” Brandstter, center with customers.

Eddie had a bit of a noir side. I didn’t know Sardi’s was destroyed by a fire! From the linked article:

The Sunset Inn, Café Montmartre, Sardi's: Wherever Adolph "Eddie" Brandstatter's night spots were, Hollywood once gathered. [After some questionable business decisions] in 1932 he declared bankruptcy and, after he sold the Montmartre, was convicted of theft for having absconded with assorted furnishings, including drapes, china and a large statue of a nude woman (described in the Los Angeles Times as "a cherished art object").

He bounced back with the even grander Sardi's, an Art Deco palace at 6315 Hollywood Blvd. In 1936, it was destroyed by a fire. Once again he bounced back, though a little less high, with the Bohemian Grill on Vine. He had been planning more restaurants (altogether he opened about 10 in a 20-year period) when he committed suicide in 1940.

It's hard to avoid the suspicion that he was what we would now call bipolar, with his expansive periods of new projects alternating with catastrophes. This would explain his charisma, and also episodes like his cutting through the wall between the Montmartre and a jewelry shop next door … without telling the landlord. The grandiosity of a manic phase might also explain why his newspaper ads never bothered to mention the Montmartre's address (6757 Hollywood Blvd.).

On the other hand, that might have been a marketing ploy, like Ma Maison's having an unlisted telephone number in the 1980s. Or, for that matter, the exceptionally inconspicuous entrance of today's Montmartre Lounge, a bar specializing in private parties for Hollywood people in the old Montmartre location, which has no sign but the letters ML.
Post 19571 of 2/13/14 Ladie pushing a coffen in Sardies. Perhaps is a Prime Rib Cart like Lawries? Carve your meat at the table.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #41990  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 6:51 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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I'm only posting this photo again because I'd really like some NLA folks opinion as to whether this photo is depicting snow
or slush or the like and maybe the year of the photo. (Do the automobiles help?)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
This is the Melrose Triangle area where Melrose Ave., Doheny Dr. and Santa Monica Blvd. come together, looking northwest, on the border of Beverly Hills and West Hollywood.

One reason I'm interested is that of all the snow related photos we've seen on NLA, I haven't seen any on the Westside like
Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, West Hollywood... We've seen them in Hollywood (La Brea, Hollywood & Vine), and the
downtown environs, the Cahuenga Pass and across the valley area.
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  #41991  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:00 PM
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HossC HossC is offline
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It must be a week or so since I posted Julius Shulman pictures of a house in Beverly Hills. This one is "Job 6131: Buff & Hensman, 1455 Claridge Drive House (Beverly Hills, Calif.), 1983". I wish there was more than just this single shot.



Getty Research Institute

The house is nearly at the end of the street, and now has neighbors. I think I preferred the original severe look before the trees grew in and the garage doors were replaced.


GSV

Here's a better look at the addition over the garage on the right.


GSV

I found a few small interior pictures at realtor.com. They also show a modest pool and pretty good view (the house is on the side of the hill).
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  #41992  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:00 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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About my post above.

I checked all the "snow" posts I could find on NLA to make sure my thoughts about where we've seen snow photos were correct.
While doing so I remembered seeing a photo of UCLA in the snow. It was on this post, but missing now:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6635

That occurred on January 15, 1932...could the photo I'm curious about be 1932? The car on the bottom might not suggest that.

This is a page from UCLA's 1932 yearbook:

UCLA Alumni Netowrk
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  #41993  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:11 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Re: Melrose Triangle photo:

Martin, it looks more like simple overexposure to me. If it had snowed, I would expect some to be on the unheated canopy of the gas station. Just IMHO.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #41994  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:21 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood Graham View Post
I remember peddling my bike to Travel town to look at this and a Zero or Zeke. That had to be 1954 or 5. I always wondered what happened to them.
If my memory serves me corectly, a big wind storm blue several trees over destroying several planes and the PE 498.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #41995  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:22 PM
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HossC HossC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post

I'm only posting this photo again because I'd really like some NLA folks opinion as to whether this photo is depicting snow
or slush or the like and maybe the year of the photo. (Do the automobiles help?)

I traced the photo to Mary Austin & Scott on Flickr. It's dated 1943, and there's no mention of snow in the description. While I can see that the lighter areas look like they could be snow, the lack of any visible snow in the park or on the roofs (as mentioned by Earl) makes me doubt that theory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post

While doing so I remembered seeing a photo of UCLA in the snow. It was on this post, but missing now.
Regarding missing images, I don't need to remind people that proper photo crediting is one of the rules of this forum, but can everyone please include direct links to the original images/pages (where possible/practicable) in their photo credits. Having an independently hosted image and a link to the original should give us double the chance of preserving/tracking down missing images.
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  #41996  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 7:52 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
originally posted by flyingwedge


The symbol/logo on this truck caught my eye. It resembles Neptune's trident upside-down.
__
That is a Mack Bulldog logo, as the truck is a Mack.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #41997  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 8:50 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Earl and HossC, thanks for your opinions on the photo. For what it's worth, a couple other people I've asked about this photo think it is snow.



A couple things for argument's sake, what is making the marks in the road that cars have traveled over. There's definitely some reason for the dark areas where the tires have driven over and the light areas that weren't.

Also, look at where the P.E. tracks are below the car that's at center left. Doesn't that look like something, whatever it is, is pushed out into the road?
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  #41998  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 10:07 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post

Here's the Burlington in a 1915 advertisement. It's unfortunate that the porch along Burlington hasn't survived:



Internet Archive
Thank you Flyingwedge for the interesting post.


Are there any plans for a survey of our historic resources? I didn't know the Burlington was an AL Haley. I'm always so disappointed that PCAD , the Conservancy, etc list so view examples on their architects pages.

I good place to start would be cross-referencing the online permits by architect and owner.

I know, I'm dreaming.

.
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  #41999  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 11:11 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C. Koehler View Post
That is a Mack Bulldog logo, as the truck is a Mack.

Paul C. Koehler



Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post


I believe that's an early Mack Truck logo...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas View Post
It is the "Badge"/"Emblem" used by the Mack Truck Company before they adopted the "Bulldog." Don't think it had any meaning beyond being an unusual "M" for Mack.
http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...ostcount=19894
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  #42000  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 11:23 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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This is a somewhat puzzling picture. The long shadow at A indicates the picture was taken in early morning or late afternoon -- somebody who knows the east/west alignment of the street would have to answer that. If morning, the chances of it being light snow or heavy frost are increased. If frost, the difference at B could be a joint between two road materials (e.g., concrete and macadam) with different thermal characteristics.

On the other hand, there does not appear to be any snow/frost on the cars in the picture or the roof of the gas station. The real puzzle lies in the shadows at C, which do not appear to be consistent with the one at A. Curious.

Can anybody figure out where the photographer was standing?

Cheers,

Earl
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