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  #23981  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 1:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post

To this day, I would not give you 50 cents for a rabbit dinner (country style or otherwise).
I'm not the sort of person who uses the the term "LOL" very often, but since I did laugh out loud when I read this comment, I think you deserve one, FredH - LOL.

I'd also like to award a LOL to Lorendoc for this great editing explanation from a recent post: "Reason: multiple attempts to render text into English". I often preview my own posts and wonder what I was thinking when I wrote them. Hopefully I catch most of my errors before I click "Submit Reply" .
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  #23982  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 2:24 PM
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gsv

gsv

Thanks for the information on 3201-3215 W. 54th Street HossC.
I'm thinking if I go through that list of former inhabitants I might come across a vintage photograph (or have you already done that?)


Using the link you provided, I noticed that the building is located in Park Mesa Heights. (that's news to me...I've never heard of a Park Mesa Heights)


http://commercial-properties.findthe...geles-CA-90043


http://commercial-properties.findthe...geles-CA-90043

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  #23983  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 6:31 PM
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Originally Posted by JScott View Post
The United States Hotel opened for business in 1863, but the structure razed in 1939 and pictured above was built in 1886.





The U.S. Hotel was supposedly acquired in 1863 by one Louis Mesmer. Some accounts imply 1866. Acquired from whom would require a search of deed records. Some historical accounts may incorrectly give Mesmer credit for building the U.S. Hotel. Historically, it is unclear whether it was originally a single or two story building and no photos of the original building seem to exist. However historical descriptions of its amenities would lead one to believe it was a two story structure. It was "remodeled" in 1886 by adding a floor and the turreted bay windows indicative of 1880's architectural concepts. The front elevation of 1886 apparently fully replaced the original front elevation. The U.S. Hotel was owned and operated by Louis Mesmer's son Joseph after his father's death in 1900 until it was razed.

According to some accounts Louis Mesmer and son Joseph were among the early "Movers & Shakers" in real estate development, and building construction in Los Angeles in the late 1800's. The Louis Mesmer family lived in the Dr. R. T. Hayes home on Fort Street, purchased in 1871. It continued to be the family residence for over twenty-five years.

Last edited by Retired_in_Texas; Oct 6, 2014 at 6:50 PM.
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  #23984  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 6:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Thanks for the information on 3201-3215 W. 54th Street HossC.
I'm thinking if I go through that list of former inhabitants I might come across a vintage photograph (or have you already done that?)
I don't want to steal all the fun - I'm quite happy for someone else to look for vintage photographs of those businesses .

BTW, thanks for reminding me of my post about the building on the corner of 54th and Crenshaw, but a couple of points I made turned out to be wrong. They were immediately corrected by GW in post #17768. I made my excuses in post #17769.


-------------


Staying with 3201 W 54th Street, I found a 1962 edition of the California Eagle on mocavo.com. Under the heading "Student Recital", it says "The students of Nicola Holland Fowles will be presented in their annual piano recital Saturday, June 22, at 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Institute of Musical Arts, 3201 W. 54th street. Guest artists will include Mrs. Vermya Phillips, lyric soprano; Miss Sarah E. Fowles, flute, and LaFayette Hight, clarinette." As 3201 W 54th Street doesn't look like the sort of place to have an auditorium, I Googled the Institute of Musical Arts and found they were across the street at 3210 W 54th Street, so I'm guessing it was a typo. Their Facebook page says that the blade sign was new in 2012, although historic Streetview images show the metal framework of the sign dates to well before that. The building out of shot to the left is also part of the institute.


GSV

The Facebook page has a link to the institute's website which has an interesting 'About' page. I was going to summarize its history, but it also gives a good overview of the changes to the neighborhood:

Quote:

HISTORY OF THE INSTITUTE OF MUSICAL ARTS

The Institute of Musical Arts (IMA) was founded in 1922, as a music training facility, by German immigrant, Raymond G. Hand who lived in the IMA residence and built and operated a music school in the facility for almost 20 years.

As the demographics of the neighborhood shifted, the area soon reflected the rich culture of the significant number of Japanese Americans who resided and owned business in the area, which became known as the Angeles Mesa section of the general Crenshaw area.

In 1943, Daniel and Lei Kawada purchased the IMA, and continued offering music training programs and opened its auditorium to the community. The IMA auditorium became the Crenshaw area’s primary performing recital hall during the 1940s-60s. It was the recital hall for the Los Angeles Unified School District and was used by many private music instructors and their students.

Another demographic shift in the late 1950s and early 1960s brought larger numbers of Black Americans into the area, and in approximately 1968 the IMA was purchased by four partners/friends:

– Ray G. Clark, an engineer at TRW who played flute and saxophone;
– Oliver P. Brown, an engineer at Rockwell who played guitar;
– Shelly Thomas, a music and band teacher who played saxophone, trumpet, piano and a host of other instruments, and worked as a studio musician; and
– Clayton Wilkins, an engineer at Rockwell who taught classical guitar.

Clark, Brown and Thomas were all members of “The Group”, a Bossa-Nova style band which performed at jazz venues in and around the greater Los Angeles area they re-discovered the IMA while searching for rehearsal space. (Ray had first encountered the facility in 1964, when his then 5-year-old daughter, Dawn, performed her first piano recital in the IMA auditorium.) They struck a deal with the Kawadas for the purchase of the IMA, and for the next several years, all four of the partners taught music, and kept the vibrant tradition of the musical arts at the forefront of the school’s programs.

In approximately 1972, Ray G. Clark and Oliver P. Brown (both Howard University engineering graduates) purchased the component parts and built a Quantum Quadraphonic Audio Mixing console, and completely remodeled a wing of the IMA, converting it into a state-of-the-art music recording studio, the Clark-Brown Audio Recording Studio (CBA). Using their knowledge of aerospace design, they made the studio one of the first to incorporate solid-state technology, foregoing the widely used vacuum tubes and transistors which were standard at that time. This forward-looking strategy anticipated the rapid evolution of music technology of the next forty years. Clark and Brown applied their aerospace engineering knowledge and skills to develop innovative techniques to recording popular artists, campaign ads and corporate training materials.

CBA soon became the premier place to record music in Los Angeles. Clark and Brown turned CBA into one of the most technologically advanced recording studios south of Hollywood. Their pioneering work provided a fertile training ground for those who would later become successful, influential musicians; and their culturally rich work environment made CBA the “go-to” studio for many established artists. Although it shared the market with Ike and Tina Turner’s Bolic Sound Studios, which was just southwest of the IMA on La Brea Avenue in Inglewood, and Ray Charles would soon open his own studio a few miles northwest of the IMA on Washington Boulevard, CBA Studios was widely regarded as THE place to record, and was known for having the “best sound in town”.

During the 1970s-80s the studio played host to a Who’s Who listing of musicians, artists, actors, politicians and local activists. Its long list of recording alumni include, Marvin Gaye, Bobby Womack, Nancy Wilson, Ernie Watts, Billy Davis, Ndugu Chancler and Patrice Rushen.

Clark and Brown operated CBA for approximately fourteen years in the IMA building. Brown handled most of the technical aspects of the studio and was the chief audio engineer. Clark handled most aspects of operating the business, while attending Southwestern University School of Law as a full-time student. He later became a prominent defense attorney.

In 1986, the IMA building was sold to Randy R. Woodard, who was in search of a larger site for his company “The Main Stream Group”, a music recording and production business that he owned along with his wife, Edwiges Lopez Woodard, Tyree Brown, Ruben Monge, Kenneth Smith and Joseph Blocker. Woodard and his team became so engrossed in the history of the IMA and CBA Studios that they found themselves pouring over the wealth of memorabilia, testimonials, old recording masters, receipts and other items that documented the precious history of IMA.

Woodard and his team were so moved by their findings, and the impact that the IMA had on its community, that they presented their findings to the City of Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission, backed by a petition of signatures that they collected in the district, and supported by letters from IMA alumni. In 1988 the Commission voted overwhelmingly to designate the IMA building “Historical-Cultural Monument #344.

IMA underwent a complete renovation in 2010, and it is now the home of:

*** The Ray G. Clark Theater, a live performance venue;
*** Spoken Word Studios, a recording studio specializing in spoken word performances, podcasts, and audio books;
*** “Doña Barbara’s Tea and Tapas”, a private event space hosting fully catered
afternoon teas, (by reservation only); and
*** Professional offices and meeting rooms.

The newly renovated IMA was pleased to host its inaugural events in the fall of 2010, and today continues its tradition of providing progressive programs that benefit and influence the surrounding Greater-Crenshaw community.

At the helm of IMA is Board Chair, Barbara H. Clark, a professional storyteller (and Ray G. Clark’s wife); their daughter, Dawn Clark-Johnson, an attorney who serves as Executive Director; and Darnell Gadberry, an engineer who is the Managing Director of IMA and the Executive Director and Producer for Spoken Word Studios.
The 1922 founding date means it predates the building opposite by seven years.


www.imalosangeles.com

Just to confuse things, another hit I got when I Googled the 3201 address was a link to the Capoeira Angola Center of Los Angeles which lists the venue type as "Ballroom/Dance Hall". I wonder if this was also a typo and whether they were using the auditorium at the IMA. Their Facebook page gives their current location as 4307 S Crenshaw.

While we're on W 54th Street, another late '20s addition to the neighborhood was MacMarr Stores, a block away at 3303 West 54th Street. I posted about its 1929 grand opening in post #19809.
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  #23985  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 7:17 PM
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Hey guys, great work going on here as always!

I've recently started an LA photo blog - www.SouthOnSpring.com - of both historic & modern stuff. Basically solely architecture, influenced heavily by my years of reading this thread.

Let me know what you think!
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Last edited by ConstructDTLA; Oct 7, 2014 at 4:49 PM.
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  #23986  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 8:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas View Post




The U.S. Hotel was supposedly acquired in 1863 by one Louis Mesmer. Some accounts imply 1866. Acquired from whom would require a search of deed records. Some historical accounts may incorrectly give Mesmer credit for building the U.S. Hotel. Historically, it is unclear whether it was originally a single or two story building and no photos of the original building seem to exist. However historical descriptions of its amenities would lead one to believe it was a two story structure. It was "remodeled" in 1886 by adding a floor and the turreted bay windows indicative of 1880's architectural concepts. The front elevation of 1886 apparently fully replaced the original front elevation. The U.S. Hotel was owned and operated by Louis Mesmer's son Joseph after his father's death in 1900 until it was razed.

According to some accounts Louis Mesmer and son Joseph were among the early "Movers & Shakers" in real estate development, and building construction in Los Angeles in the late 1800's. The Louis Mesmer family lived in the Dr. R. T. Hayes home on Fort Street, purchased in 1871. It continued to be the family residence for over twenty-five years.


The original United States Hotel was, indeed, a two-storey structure (at left, by the flagpole):


Stereoscope photo by Henry T. Payne, ca. 1880, via Wikimedia Commons. (File image cropped.)

I don't know if it's really possible to state definitively one way or another if the 1886 hotel incorporated portions of the original or not. Either POV can only be termed speculation based upon what scant evidence we have available to us today. If some of the old building was added onto, my guess would be only the bottom floor was retained, but that large corner entrance on the ground floor of the 1886 hotel was clearly a new structural element not present in the original building.
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Last edited by JScott; Dec 26, 2017 at 11:50 PM. Reason: Substitution of superior quality image
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  #23987  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2014, 9:45 PM
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Street scene, E. 8th Street, 1931

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Oct 6, 2014 at 10:06 PM.
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  #23988  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

-an obscure postcard.


ebay

Berger's...
...for Quick Service
101 W. 6th St.
Los Angeles

I'm not 100% sure, but I think the building is gone.
Does anyone know what building it would have been in?
This postcard has been bugging me for a few days. There's no date to work with, Berger's doesn't appear in the CDs, and none of the images I found of 6th and Main matched the building above (including the recent panoramas of Main Street). Then I played around with the contrast and wondered whether it actually does say "101". The first digit is shorter than the third, so could it be "901"? That would be the corner of 6th and Figueroa, and we're not looking at the Bellevue Terrace Hotel or the Jonathan Club. My last option was "701", and that's where I got lucky. Here's the northwest corner of 6th and Hope Streets in 1927. I can't find the T.J. Lawrence Co at 701 W 6th, but I did find reference to a realty company with that name only a couple of blocks away at around the same time. The picture also shows the Hotel Lamm and Hotel Lovera. My search for more pictures led me to find that a smaller version of this picture was previously posted in a series of "then and now" shots by 213 in post #93.


LAPL

I'm not sure of the build date, but I did find this demolition picture dated August 1955. The caption says it was wrecked for the Superior Oil Building. In the background is the California Club, which wasn't built until a couple of years after the picture above.


Huntington Digital Library

Here's are the businesses I found at 701 W 6th Street:

1898 C E Barschig - grocers
1900-1901 Frank Snow - grocers
1909 J J Sickner - second-hand goods
1911 William O Buckles - restaurant
1915 Jacob D Moss - tailor
1917 Aaron Nadler - tailor
1918 Harry Brusau - trunk manufacturer
1929 California Producers Inc - real estate
1932 George Collins - restaurant
1936 Loretta Brown - restaurant
1939 Tom Shaw Hong - restaurant
1942 William Keil - restaurant

So where does that leave us date-wise? It was a restaurant in 1911, but then returned to being a restaurant in 1932 for at least a decade. I think the "Complete Dinners" sign on the end window quotes prices of 25 and 35 cents, which would suggest a later date than the sepia toning implies. The larger text in the sign above the word "Luncheon" says "Eastern Hamburgers" and "Coney Island".

Back in post# 13019, e_r posted an eBay find showing the Los Angeles Public Library in 1943. I wish it was a USC image so I could zoom in. I've had to make do with enlarging a small section and tweaking the levels. I can't read the sign, but it's obviously not the Berger's sign seen above. Having said that, the awnings, the gooseneck lights over the sign and the blade sign all look the same. I'm going to guess that Berger's was trading at 701 W 6th in the mid-40s.


Detail of picture found on eBay by ethereal_reality.

The site is now a parking lot for The Standard Downtown LA, a boutique hotel in the former Superior Oil Company Building.


GSV
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  #23989  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 3:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
This postcard has been bugging me for a few days. There's no date to work with, Berger's doesn't appear in the CDs, and none of the images I found of 6th and Main matched the building above (including the recent panoramas of Main Street). Then I played around with the contrast and wondered whether it actually does say "101". The first digit is shorter than the third, so could it be "901"? That would be the corner of 6th and Figueroa, and we're not looking at the Bellevue Terrace Hotel or the Jonathan Club. My last option was "701", and that's where I got lucky. Here's the northwest corner of 6th and Hope Streets in 1927. I can't find the T.J. Lawrence Co at 701 W 6th, but I did find reference to a realty company with that name only a couple of blocks away at around the same time. The picture also shows the Hotel Lamm and Hotel Lovera. My search for more pictures led me to find that a smaller version of this picture was previously posted in a series of "then and now" shots by 213 in post #93.


LAPL

I'm not sure of the build date, but I did find this demolition picture dated August 1955. The caption says it was wrecked for the Superior Oil Building. In the background is the California Club, which wasn't built until a couple of years after the picture above.


Huntington Digital Library

Here's are the businesses I found at 701 W 6th Street:

1898 C E Barschig - grocers
1900-1901 Frank Snow - grocers
1909 J J Sickner - second-hand goods
1911 William O Buckles - restaurant
1915 Jacob D Moss - tailor
1917 Aaron Nadler - tailor
1918 Harry Brusau - trunk manufacturer
1929 California Producers Inc - real estate
1932 George Collins - restaurant
1936 Loretta Brown - restaurant
1939 Tom Shaw Hong - restaurant
1942 William Keil - restaurant

So where does that leave us date-wise? It was a restaurant in 1911, but then returned to being a restaurant in 1932 for at least a decade. I think the "Complete Dinners" sign on the end window quotes prices of 25 and 35 cents, which would suggest a later date than the sepia toning implies. The larger text in the sign above the word "Luncheon" says "Eastern Hamburgers" and "Coney Island".

Back in post# 13019, e_r posted an eBay find showing the Los Angeles Public Library in 1943. I wish it was a USC image so I could zoom in. I've had to make do with enlarging a small section and tweaking the levels. I can't read the sign, but it's obviously not the Berger's sign seen above. Having said that, the awnings, the gooseneck lights over the sign and the blade sign all look the same. I'm going to guess that Berger's was trading at 701 W 6th in the mid-40s.


Detail of picture found on eBay by ethereal_reality.

The site is now a parking lot for The Standard Downtown LA, a boutique hotel in the former Superior Oil Company Building.


GSV
Here is some biography on the owner of Berger's which gives confirmation to the 1940's date of the restaurant:
Francis (Frank) Michael Berger was born in Missouri on November 30, 1875 to German immigrant parents. His father was a mechanic. He is found, at the age of four, in the 1880 Census, living in Appleton, St Clair County, Missouri.

He married Luella Thomas, born in Nevada in 1871, on August 7, 1900 in Silver Bow County, Montana. They had a daughter, Lorena (Lola), who was born in Montana in 1901, (She married a Rutherford Beck) and a son Lewis Frank Berger (born in 1907, in Nevada)

He appears in directories, prior to his marriage, in Montana, working in various capacities, including as a mining smelter. The area had many copper mines at that time.

They appear in the 1910 Census, living in Sacramento, CA. At that time he is listed in the Census as being an employee of a restaurant. They moved to Los Angeles before 1918 when he appears in the draft registrations for the First World War.

His WWI draft registration card describes him as being of medium build with blue eyes and dark brown hair. They lived at 215 N. Broadway, Los Angeles when his draft card was filled out in 1918. This is, of course, now the lawn in front of City Hall, part of Grand Park.

The 1930 Census lists him as being employed as a confectioner. His wife was listed as being a saleslady at the confectionery. At that time they lived at 4037 Glassell Avenue. (now apparently Glassell Street, the area is now condos) Her mother lived with them.

The Bergers lived in Eagle Rock in 1937, according to a directory. He is listed as being a restaurant worker. At that time, they lived at 4041 Eagle Rock Blvd.

The 1940 Census gives the clue as to the date of the restaurant. It lists Frank as being the proprietor of a restaurant. Frank and Luella were living with their daughter and her husband at 4805 York Blvd., at the time of the 1940 Census in April of 1940. This house, built in 1921, is still there.

He died on March 3, 1952 in Los Angeles.
His wife died in Los Angeles in December of 1962
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  #23990  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 9:13 PM
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Sunset Tower

photo by Santi Visalli
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  #23991  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 9:34 PM
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Great sleuthing HossC and oldstuff on Berger's Restaurant. I should have looked closer at that 101 address.
I was just thrilled to have found the postcard.
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  #23992  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 10:27 PM
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and speaking of sleuthing....

I am going to need some help in figuring out where in Hollywood this photograph was taken.
-not too many clues. (the houses, obviously...the streetlight missing a couple globes....the shape of the hills)


ebay
"Hollywood, Los Angeles, March 1917"


reverse


Good luck!
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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Oct 7, 2014 at 11:40 PM.
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  #23993  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 11:09 PM
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Just for fun, I've also been trying to figure out which downtown street this photograph was taken.


www.badgehistory.com

"LAPD Officer Voy Kay Apt in 1920's ticketing Santa."

Again, there aren't that many clues. There is the blade sign at left (S E D...B R I C K?)
And if those boys are newsies, maybe they're in front of the Los Angeles Examiner building (or one of the other newspaper co.)
...also there are the other two signs on the right (one ends in King)

oops. I almost missed the obvious. There's the advertisement on Santa's bag with an address...V A _O R(?) Clothing Co. entrance 214 So.' Broadway.
(of course Mr. Claus could have wandered several blocks from the store he's been paid to advertise)

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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Oct 7, 2014 at 11:41 PM.
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  #23994  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 11:32 PM
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A couple days ago (on ebay), I found these two extraordinary photographs of Santa Monica, circa 1917!


ebay


The sign either says Palace Bathing Club or Private Bathing Club.




ebay

It's pretty cool to see the private dressing rooms on the beach (like in the U.K.)

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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Oct 7, 2014 at 11:42 PM.
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  #23995  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 11:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Just for fun, I've also been trying to figure out which downtown street this photograph was taken.


www.badgehistory.com

"LAPD Officer Voy Kay Apt in 1920's ticketing Santa."

Again, there aren't that many clues. There is the blade sign at left (S E D...B R I C K?)
And if those boys are newsies, maybe they're in front of the Los Angeles Examiner building (or one of the other newspaper co.)
...also there are the other two signs on the right (one ends in King)

oops. I almost missed the obvious. There's the advertisement on Santa's bag with an address...V A _O R(?) Clothing Co. entrance 214 So.' Broadway.
(of course Mr. Claus could have wandered several blocks from the store he's been paid to advertise)
The "SED BRICK" lettering is part of the "L.A. PRESSED BRICK CO" sign on the C H Frost Building at 2nd and Broadway, seen here around 1924.


USC Digital Library

The "KING" on the right belongs to the Hotel New King at 206½ S Broadway. You can also see the entrance of the Victor Clothing Co, as advertised on Santa's bag.


Detail of picture in USC Digital Library

Last edited by HossC; Oct 8, 2014 at 12:26 AM. Reason: Added Hotel New King/Victor Clothing picture.
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  #23996  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2014, 12:21 AM
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Guess Where Vice-President Joe Biden Was Today

LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Vice President Joe Biden attended a roundtable discussion on minimum wage with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Tuesday.

Business leaders also participated in the discussion at the L.A. Baking Company in Lincoln Heights around 10:15 a.m.


Remember my post from last December?

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=18194

I bet the place really impressed old Joe!
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  #23997  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2014, 12:32 AM
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Newsboy wool caps were the rage in 1920

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Just for fun, I've also been trying to figure out which downtown street this photograph was taken.


www.badgehistory.com

"LAPD Officer Voy Kay Apt in 1920's ticketing Santa."

Again, there aren't that many clues. There is the blade sign at left (S E D...B R I C K?)
And if those boys are newsies, maybe they're in front of the Los Angeles Examiner building (or one of the other newspaper co.)
...also there are the other two signs on the right (one ends in King)

oops. I almost missed the obvious. There's the advertisement on Santa's bag with an address...V A _O R(?) Clothing Co. entrance 214 So.' Broadway.
(of course Mr. Claus could have wandered several blocks from the store he's been paid to advertise)

__
Thanks ER for the street scene photo....

I noticed all the boys were wearing a similar style cap.

Sears catalog page from 1921.....


pinterest
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  #23998  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2014, 12:44 AM
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-damn, you're fast....47 minutes HossC -kudos! -and you located both Hotel New King and Victor Clothing Co.
-so Santa hadn't wandered very far at all...he was right in front of the store.



Los Angeles Railway streetcar near the old Selig Zoo gates, 1954.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrol...ve/2931568457/

Is that a Tilt-A-Whirl?



below: Detail of my favorite photograph of the Selig Zoo gate. (love the girl with the sunglasses)

1930s
ebay

See the complete photograph here (there's even an elephant!!)
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=9430

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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Oct 8, 2014 at 1:16 AM.
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  #23999  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2014, 1:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

A couple days ago (on ebay), I found these two extraordinary photographs of Santa Monica, circa 1917!

The sign either says Palace Bathing Club or Private Bathing Club.


ebay

It's pretty cool to see the private dressing rooms on the beach (like in the U.K.)
The sign actually says "PALACE BATHING CAR CO". This image is part of a circa 1920 picture.


Detail of picture in USC Digital Library

Here's the full picture showing Santa Monica's pleasure pier.


USC Digital Library

And the view looking in the other direction. This one was previously posted by e_r in a post about the camera obscura.


USC Digital Library
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Old Posted Oct 8, 2014, 1:59 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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-a simply beautiful advertising card (1890s?)

Dillman & Will

ebay


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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Oct 8, 2014 at 9:09 PM.
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