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  #19981  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 1:39 AM
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Wig-Wag Wig-Wag is offline
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History Maker

Chucaluck's recent inquiry about the "S" line loob at 8th and Westen reminded me of a piece I wrote for a rail enthusiasts site a awhile back. Set during WWII, It briefly outlines the contribution of women street car motorman, conductors, and bus drivers to the war effort on the home front. The operator in the piece was a regular motorman during my late teenage years.

The lady in the picture is Cora M. Dravis. She joined the Los Angeles Railway in the dark days of World War II, when women replaced men called up to serve in the military.

In September of 1942 the privately owned and operated Los Angeles Railway earned the distinction of being the first transit agency in the U.S. to hire women to operating positions. San Diego Electric Railway followed shortly thereafter, and the practice soon spread across the country.

Cora became one of more than 300 women employed by LARY as Motormanettes, Conductorettes, Coachettes and Driverettes. The requirements at the time were modest - age 21-40, weight 120-140, and height 5’3”-5’10.” Initially all of the women operated out of one division owing to a lack of restroom facilities.

Cora is shown here at the Whittier and Brannick loop. The year is 1963, and on March 31, her career as a streetcar operator will end with the abandonment of LA's last five streetcar lines. Cora will become a bus driver for a short while, before retiring from the Los Angeles Metroplolitan Transit Authorty with an accident free record. She has since passed on, but her contribution, and that of her wartime sisters to the battle on the home front lives on in Los Angeles rail transportation history.


While not in the Noir genre, hopefully viewers will find it interesting.





Cheers,
Jack

Last edited by Wig-Wag; Mar 6, 2014 at 2:52 AM.
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  #19982  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 2:25 AM
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HossC HossC is offline
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I thought the landmark of 1000 pages should be commemorated with some additions to another landmark .


Original photo from USC Digital Library
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  #19983  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 2:49 AM
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Wig-Wag Wig-Wag is offline
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1000 Page Commemoration

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Originally Posted by HossC View Post
I thought the landmark of 1000 pages should be commemorated with some additions to another landmark .


Original photo from USC Digital Library
Outstanding, HossC!

Cheers,
Jack
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  #19984  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 3:36 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Batting 1000!

HossC, I love your post! You're batting 1000!

Reflecting on reaching this milestone of 1,000 pages, I want to post one of my favorite pictures from a past post…

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post


Julius Shulman
I posted a small size version of the above pic, but the bigger the better for me with this photo. I love that it's by Julius Shulman, an interior of the Freeman House by Frank Lloyd Wright, but looks out upon an exterior of an iconic Hollywood Blvd. building, with another behind the tree.

There have been other similar photos taken from the same spot, with different interior decors, various sizes, and scenery (the tree is bigger). For a long time, before I read about it, I thought it was taken from the Roosevelt Hotel looking down Hollywood Blvd. instead of looking down Highland from the Hollywood Hills.

A few other photos of this subject:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8429/7
Julius-Shulman-and-Los-Angeles

http://www.michaelunderwood.com/pix/

http://www.taschen.com/media/images/480/cover

*************

...and I like this astute observation that was posted by I Also Remember LA:

I absolutely miss Los Angeles after having left in 1978. And I miss all the good memories that really were merely daily life but seem so great compared to today.

That sentiment and this forum have made me pay more attention to buildings and locations and other things while traveling around the city so that I can appreciate them for what they are now and were then, and not take them for granted as in merely daily life when we put off appreciating or noticing things until later on when we remember them. I now enjoy being a tourist in my own town to appreciate and celebrate the things around us.

************

And the above prompts this QUESTION:

IF YOU COULD TRAVEL BACK IN TIME TO LOS ANGELES, WHAT WOULD YOU TAKE PHOTOS OF?

My answer would be, first: A color photo of the huge mural inside the NBC Building at Sunset and Vine. I've searched for one, but have never come across it. I just know there has to be one someplace!

************

And I like this apropos sentiment by BifRayRock:

Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

Whether you attempt to hold on to the past or reach for the future, noir has its own schedule.

http://www.mikesbawx.org/photo/displ...e.php?pid=3650
************

A thank you to Ethereal_Reality for starting this thread and maintaining it with enthusiastic resolve as the years (!) have progressed. Also, a hearty nod to everyone who's contributed, from the regulars to the lone posters who occasionally visit to punctuate the shadows.

******

…and now for a little more MONKEY ISLAND…?

I found this photo dated 1940 and I can't really tell if Monkey Island is in the bottom right hand corner. It might be just out of frame, but it's definitely Barham (or Dark Canyon Road as it was then known) crossing the freeway and Monkey Island should be just around the road there to the right a bit. What do you guys think?

Most photos of this area are taken from the opposite direction.

David Gebhard & Harriette Von Breton
Photo date: 1940
U.S. Highway 101
Between Hollywood and Universal City

Caption: This 1.5 mile section of highway was originally known as the "Cahuenga Pass Freeway." It opened on June 15, 1940. Now known locally as the Hollywood Freeway and officially as US Highway 101 and California State Route 134, this freeway section follows the ancient Indian trail through the Cahuenga Pass to link the LA Basin and the San Fernando Valley. This photo looks south toward Hollywood. The lake in the upper-left corner is the Hollywood Reservoir. This section of the Hollywood Freeway is still in use today and is quite heavily traveled.

Here's the aerial to compare it to:

Quote:
Originally Posted by FredH View Post
1948:

historicaerials.com
***

I stumbled upon a blog by someone who worked at Hanna-Barbera animation studio and here's part of an item of interest I noticed in one section:

Joe Barbera had his office down on the first floor where he was often seen signing limited edition cels. Whenever I had a visitor come by the studio, I made a point to stop by and introduce them to Mr. Barbera. He was always kind enough to give a personal tour of his office. […] After that tour, I would walk my guests up to the third floor where Mr. Hanna occupied the penthouse. Whereas Mr. Barbera's office was dark with wood paneling and filled with awards and memorabilia, Mr. Hanna's office was white and spacious with lots of windows (but still filled with awards and memorabilia). He also had an aerial picture of the now extinct Monkey Island hanging beside the entrance to his door.

http://vanpartible.com/fun-stuff/pho.../hanna-barbera

Hmmmmm…now just where is that photo???
__________

I emailed the blog writer, Van Partible, and he emailed me a reply just a day ago.
Here's the pertinent parts of his note:

Hi, I used to belong to a zine where I wrote about Monkey Island because everyone used to believe Hanna-Barbera was located at the same spot where Monkey Island resided. It's been rumored for years that the Hanna-Barbera building was built directly over the old plot of land, when, in fact it was the lot next door. If you view the sight at historicaerials.com [WHICH WE HAVE ON THIS FORUM--PHOTO ABOVE], it's quite clear that the two properties never shared the same space.

He addresses the photo:

Yes, Bill Hanna even had a beautiful black and white aerial photo of Monkey Island just outside of his old office (I would have loved to have made a copy of the print, but it wouldn't have been feasible to take it down from his wall and walk it over to the copier machine back then).

Many of the Hanna-Barbera artists knew the park as a place where you could go and smoke (cigarettes and other funny stuff) freely, away from the studio. I've discussed the old amusement attraction with several people who used to work at Hanna-Barbera. Star Wirth, the old head of the Xerox department, told me that Hanna-Barbera used to rent out offices in the Taft building next door, but they never owned the land at 3300 Cahuenga. Although, they did own the land on the opposite side the bridge going up to Universal at one time, but Mr. Barbera donated it to the Braille Institute (who still own it today).


Taft Building?

I had wondered if the aerial in Mr. Hanna's office was the “historic aerials” photo we have seen, but, as he writes above, he seems to indicate it is not.

He concludes:

I recently went over to the L.A. Public library to see if there was anything new unearthed about the subject.
I did find something you may not have seen and I enclose the image in this reply.


LAPL

Last edited by Martin Pal; Feb 10, 2017 at 5:00 PM. Reason: restore last photo
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  #19985  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 5:12 AM
alanlutz alanlutz is offline
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Bruce, AKA, E_R, Congrats on 1000 pages. To commemorate, besides posting today, RickM and myself did raise our glasses on Feb 23 and toast to the success and long life of "noirish Los Angeles" at our meetup at the Los Angeles Central Library and across the street at the "One Bunker Hill" outdoor cafe, new additions to the Edison building. Will stay glued to these pages for the next thousand and lots more learning and sharing. Thanks, Alan
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  #19986  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 5:34 AM
jaco jaco is offline
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Court Flight Repairs

[/URL]



1st time I've seen this photo, repairs being made? Look to the right and you'll see some tired men, trekking up the steep incline.

I just want to say thanks for this forum!

source: http://framework.latimes.com/2013/08...d-railroad/#/2
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  #19987  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 7:11 AM
ProphetM ProphetM is offline
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Congrats to everyone who has kept this thread going with great posts for a thousand pages!

And that is a great pic, HossC.
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  #19988  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 7:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kznyc2k View Post

I love how these things can be so mundane and yet so damn intriguing.

FWIW that has to be a steel soda or beer can, which means it must have lain around in that rubble for the better part of fifty years. Aluminum would never tarnish like that, would it?

Does anyone remember when steel went out and aluminum came in?

ETA: But I don't remember this type of pull tab on steel cans...
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The new Wandering In L.A. post is published!

A Couple Of Before-And-Afters That Won't Make You Sad
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  #19989  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 7:40 AM
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  #19990  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 2:28 PM
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Our Town...


A nice round number, 1935

October 1935. "Agricultural worker in migrant camp figuring his year's earnings," Medium-format nitrate negative by Dorothea Lange for the Resettlement Administration.

Shorpy




Sodium Vapor streetlighting, Saugus

Inbound on the Ridge Route, 1937.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Hardscrabble hotel on an unnamed street, undated

You're going to need a place to hole up.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Looking southwest across Hope Street between 1st and 2nd, ca.1950

It won't look much better in the morning. We're looking southwest across Hope Street with the Stanley Hotel/Apartments over there, beyond the palm tree, at 2nd and Flower Streets. On the right we see the back of the red brick, three-story Westmont Apartments (originally the Mack) at 124 S. Flower and next door, to the left, the white New Brunswick Apartments (formerly the Isabella) at 130 S. Flower, where there will be a kidnapping (and presumed murder) of a state witness in the Mabel Monahan case in 1953.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Looking northwest across Hope Street between 1st and 2nd Streets, ca.1950

Bright, white five-story building over here on the right is the Majestic Apartments at 702 W. 1st Street. “Out of the apartment houses come women who should be young but have faces like stale beer; men with pulled down hats and quick eyes that look the street over behind the cupped hand that shields the match flame; worn intellectuals with cigarette coughs and no money in the bank; fly cops with granite faces and unwavering eyes; cookies and coke peddlers; people who look like nothing in particular and know it, and once in a while even men that actually go to work. But they come out early, when the wide cracked sidewalks are empty and still have dew on them. (from) "The High Window”
― Raymond Chandler

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Looking north across the intersection of 9th, Main and Spring Streets, 1948

Hotel Hampshire on the right, the Roseland Roof over here on the left and everything else a man needs in-between.

waterandpower.org



Gatti & Conterno Billiards, 20th and Olympic Boulevard, Sawtelle, 1936

Stop in at Gatti's, play a little stick, maybe pick up a job. Maybe not. Welcome to hard times.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Green Cat Cafe, Santa Ana, 1939

Stop in at the Green Cat, fry cook's a good guy, sometimes, if the boss ain't around, he'll help a fella out with a cuppa joe and a wedge of yesterday's custard pie.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Jehnkes Service Station, Whittier, 1937

Maybe grab a coke on the way back to the flop. Maybe talk this guy out of a quart of oil. Maybe flip him for it. Maybe.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Mr. Fletcher Johns, 1925

Maybe something'll turn up tomorrow. Yeah. Maybe.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library


One thousand is a big number. Thanks to all who have kept it going. The respect and affection for L.A. is apparent.

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Mar 6, 2014 at 3:08 PM.
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  #19991  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 3:35 PM
oldstuff oldstuff is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post

A nice round number, 1935

October 1935. "Agricultural worker in migrant camp figuring his year's earnings," Medium-format nitrate negative by Dorothea Lange for the Resettlement Administration.

Shorpy




Sodium Vapor streetlighting, Saugus

Inbound on the Ridge Route, 1937.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Hardscrabble hotel on an unnamed street, undated

You're going to need a place to hole up.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Looking southwest across Hope Street between 1st and 2nd, ca.1950

It won't look much better in the morning. We're looking southwest across Hope Street with the Stanley Hotel/Apartments over there, beyond the palm tree, at 2nd and Flower Streets. On the right we see the back of the red brick, three-story Westmont Apartments (originally the Mack) at 124 S. Flower and next door, to the left, the white New Brunswick Apartments (formerly the Isabella) at 130 S. Flower, where there will be a kidnapping (and presumed murder) of a state witness in the Mabel Monahan case in 1953.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Looking northwest across Hope Street between 1st and 2nd Streets, ca.1950

Bright, white five-story building over here on the right is the Majestic Apartments at 702 W. 1st Street. “Out of the apartment houses come women who should be young but have faces like stale beer; men with pulled down hats and quick eyes that look the street over behind the cupped hand that shields the match flame; worn intellectuals with cigarette coughs and no money in the bank; fly cops with granite faces and unwavering eyes; cookies and coke peddlers; people who look like nothing in particular and know it, and once in a while even men that actually go to work. But they come out early, when the wide cracked sidewalks are empty and still have dew on them. (from) "The High Window”
― Raymond Chandler

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Looking north across the intersection of 9th, Main and Spring Streets, 1948

Hotel Hampshire on the right, the Roseland Roof over here on the left and everything else a man needs in-between.

waterandpower.org



Gatti & Conterno Billiards, 20th and Olympic Boulevard, Sawtelle, 1936

Stop in at Gatti's, play a little stick, maybe pick up a job. Maybe not. Welcome to hard times.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Green Cat Cafe, Santa Ana, 1939

Stop in at the Green Cat, fry cook's a good guy, sometimes, if the boss ain't around, he'll help a fella out with a cuppa joe and a wedge of yesterday's custard pie.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Jehnkes Service Station, Whittier, 1937

Maybe grab a coke on the way back to the flop. Maybe talk this guy out of a quart of oil. Maybe flip him for it. Maybe.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library



Mr. Fletcher Johns, 1925

Maybe something'll turn up tomorrow. Yeah. Maybe.

Southern California Edison Photographs and Negatives, Huntington Digital Library


One thousand is a big number. Thanks to all who have kept it going. The respect and affection for L.A. is apparent.
A little bit of "person information" Fletcher C. Johns was born in Louisiana in 1873. He is found in LA directories as early as 1902, where it seems he was working as a boot black. He appears in the 1920 census, listed as a lodger, living at 615 E. 4th street in what appears to be a fairly large place, given the number of persons living there. He was listed in that census as being a janitor in an office building. The place where Mr. Johns lived was run by a Mary V. Walton, her sister and mother.

The 1930 Census also lists Mr. Johns as being a janitor, but this census notes that he worked in the Southern California Edison building. By then, he was living on East 33rd Street and was rooming with another man who was also a janitor. Mr Johns died on August 27, 1944 in Los Angeles.

Just a small personal note in the larger Noir picture.


Congratulations on 1000 pages. Keep up the good work!!
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  #19992  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 3:51 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Thank you to all contributors!


____________________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm View Post
FWIW that has to be a steel soda or beer can, which means it must have lain around in that rubble for the better part of fifty years. Aluminum would never tarnish like that, would it?

Does anyone remember when steel went out and aluminum came in?

ETA: But I don't remember this type of pull tab on steel cans...


Pull top lids made from steel are available today, maybe not for the beverages you mention, but for soups, vegetables, pet foods, tuna fish and the like. To the best of my recollection, "pop top" lids didn't arrive on the scene until the '60s. (Immortalized by Jimmy Buffet) Before that, there were keys (sardine cans), screwdrivers, and the ubiquitous bottle/can openers to get at the sealed contents.



http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNj...-jQ~~60_35.JPG


http://tincantraveler.files.wordpres...pg?w=512&h=312

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Can_Opener.jpg


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-_-fwriByLD...n%2Bopener.jpg




"There it is. Take it."
http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf4489p2f2/hi-res

Quote:
Terminal Island launched a worldwide tuna canning industry. In 1912 Wilbur Wood, one of the men attributed with inventing the tuna canning process, opened the California Tunny Company located at 338 Cannery Street in Terminal Island. Two years later he sold it to Frank Van Camp who operated it as the Van Camp Seafood Company from 1914 through 1997 when the name changed to that of his signature brand name Chicken of the Sea Cannery. Frank and his son Gilbert introduced innovations such as refrigerated fishing boats that remained industry standards for decades. They also lead a successful campaign to introduce tuna to the average American consumer, by proposing that the San Pedro canners pool their advertising funds and set the price at a low ten cents per can. Terminal Island also played a crucial role in both World Wars as a major shipbuilding center, and housed a Japanese-American community of nearly 3,000 residents, who were the first in the nation to be forcibly removed from their homes and interned during World War II. In 2012 the National Trust for Historic Preservation named Los Terminal Island to its 2012 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.
1938 - Terminal Island - docked fishing boats, Van Camp Seafood Co. and the French Sardine Co.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00100/00100895.jpg

Last edited by Tourmaline; Mar 6, 2014 at 4:07 PM.
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  #19993  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 3:59 PM
Trucker Trucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wig-Wag View Post
Pat, I have not been in that area for a long time, but believe that most if not all of the wells were capped off as the area has come under redevelopment.

This was the old Los Angeles City Oil Field and most of the remaining wells were only pumping one or two barrels a day back in the early 1970's. With the "Oil Crisis" of 1973 and the later "Energy Crisis" of 1979 it became economically viable to pump water and steam into the wells and this boosted production quantities for a while, but was a relatively short lived endeavor.

Cheers,
Jack
Thanks for the background Jack.....very interesting.

Cheers,Pat
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  #19994  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 4:02 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldstuff View Post
A little bit of "person information" Fletcher C. Johns was born in Louisiana in 1873. He is found in LA directories as early as 1902, where it seems he was working as a boot black. He appears in the 1920 census, listed as a lodger, living at 615 E. 4th street in what appears to be a fairly large place, given the number of persons living there. He was listed in that census as being a janitor in an office building. The place where Mr. Johns lived was run by a Mary V. Walton, her sister and mother.

The 1930 Census also lists Mr. Johns as being a janitor, but this census notes that he worked in the Southern California Edison building. By then, he was living on East 33rd Street and was rooming with another man who was also a janitor. Mr Johns died on August 27, 1944 in Los Angeles.

Just a small personal note in the larger Noir picture.

Thanks oldstuff. I C&P'd over to my photo-stream. Appreciate it.

Interestingly, 615 E. 4th Street is a hotel with an unusual footprint at the confluence of 4th Street, Central and Stanford Avenues. I haven't been able to find a name for the hotel nor, obviously, a picture but will work on it.

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Mar 6, 2014 at 4:23 PM.
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  #19995  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 4:06 PM
Trucker Trucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas View Post
I was wondering a bit of the same. Given the era, I'll suggest there are still pipes running all over the place to collector lines. Ran into a bunch of old pipes in South Central Kentucky in 1960 when we were drilling there that were left over from 1927. A more interesting aspect of those old L.A. area fields may be they probably only managed to pump less than 50% of the oil that could be pumped today given vast changes in technology and the fact those were all probably very shallow wells. About the only thing that would prevent more recovery would be if what is remaining has the viscosity of the La Brea Tar pits. Of course drilling that area is risky at best given the geological instability of the area. And then there is the risk of loosing investment from a shift. Typical well today runs $4-6 million to complete.
Very interesting RIT...I suppose one day, if the price of oil gets high enough the fracking trucks will show up!
Cheers,Pat
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  #19996  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 4:16 PM
Trucker Trucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graybeard View Post
Graybeard,
Great job on the photo ! They could use you at the USC archives. A fair number of the photos on this website came from the Dick Whittington collection at USC....they (USC) have scanned about 15,000 of the negatives but they have 500,000 ! The negatives are starting to deteriorate and I hope they get a bunch more done before they are gone forever.
Thanks,Pat
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  #19997  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 4:58 PM
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I posted this 1953 picture of the Civic Center yesterday.


USC Digital Library

Then I found these 1955 pictures looking northwest from somewhere near the Hall of Justice/North Broadway. The roughly horizontal road across the middle of both shots is North Hill Street. I did think about stitching the two pictures together, but the photographer moved between shots. I've done my best to darken the top of both pictures as the originals were almost white, and there was very little contrast in the background.


hemmings.com

On the right, the Hollywood Freeway is now complete and in use.


hemmings.com

Just for fun, I tried to recreate the USC shot using Google Earth. It doesn't take many fingers to count the number of buildings that are still standing 60 years later!


Google Earth
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  #19998  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 6:10 PM
jg6544 jg6544 is offline
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Originally Posted by Lorendoc View Post
1000 pages, amazing. Thanks to e_r and all the others for making this such an fascinating corner of the internets...
Wow!
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  #19999  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 7:12 PM
Lorendoc Lorendoc is offline
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Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Excellent - I laughed at this one.

otoh, I see that imageshack is now a pay site. are there any free alternatives?
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  #20000  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 8:59 PM
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Old beer cans in the desert

[QUOTE=Those Who Squirm;6481209]FWIW that has to be a steel soda or beer can, which means it must have lain around in that rubble for the better part of fifty years. Aluminum would never tarnish like that, would it?

Does anyone remember when steel went out and aluminum came in?

I've found countless old beer cans in the Coachella Valley (Desert Hot Springs near Dillon Road towards Thousand Palms) from 70's pop-tops to original steel cans that were opened with a can opener - two triangular openings on opposite sides. I've collected a few and will post next time I'm out there.
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