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  #4741  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2014, 9:25 PM
ppdd ppdd is offline
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Originally Posted by InTheBurbs View Post
I'm assuming he was talking about the AC as well.

Also, in the latest reports on the Tesla factory, Tucson isn't mentioned as a possible location.

KOAT in Albuquerque reports that ABQ is in the lead over Phoenix, Reno and Austin.

And the Phoenix Business Journal says Tesla has been looking at sites in the Phoenix area.
The Tesla project won't end up in Tucson.
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  #4742  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2014, 9:52 PM
sh9730 sh9730 is offline
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The Tesla project won't end up in Tucson.
Who knows - Im amazed at how tight lipped city leaders and staff have managed to stay (in all the competing states) on possible sites.

However, IF IF IF it were to come to AZ, it wouldnt completely surprise me to see it somewhere in Pinal County - maybe Casa Grande. All the rail is in place, and there are large swaths of CHEAP land available suitable for the wind/solar power they plan on using to power the factory....

A negative factor is a workforce though - at present that would mean a reverse commute for people in Tucson/Phoenix - especially when (not so much if anymore) the Phoenixmart project is completed and much of the local available workforce is sucked up for that....although they are completely different types of labor of course.

I ve read a couple of articles that HINT Pinal county is high on the list of AZ sites, but who the heck knows....?
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  #4743  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2014, 11:59 PM
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Originally Posted by sh9730 View Post
Who knows - Im amazed at how tight lipped city leaders and staff have managed to stay (in all the competing states) on possible sites.

However, IF IF IF it were to come to AZ, it wouldnt completely surprise me to see it somewhere in Pinal County - maybe Casa Grande. All the rail is in place, and there are large swaths of CHEAP land available suitable for the wind/solar power they plan on using to power the factory....

A negative factor is a workforce though - at present that would mean a reverse commute for people in Tucson/Phoenix - especially when (not so much if anymore) the Phoenixmart project is completed and much of the local available workforce is sucked up for that....although they are completely different types of labor of course.

I ve read a couple of articles that HINT Pinal county is high on the list of AZ sites, but who the heck knows....?
The cost of the land is inconsequential to a project like this. Hiring 6,500 people in Pinal County would be even harder that it would be in Pima County (nearly impossible) and while the rail infrastructure is nice, water and power infrastructure are more important. I don't believe CG can support the demands required.

Getting commuters from the two metro areas would be a challenge - though it would be great reason to get a Phoenix <--> Tucson rail connection going.
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  #4744  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 5:24 AM
Ted Lyons Ted Lyons is online now
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My question here (and all this does is serve to undermine Albuquerque's chances as well) is how can Albuquerque be competitive if Tucson isn't?
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  #4745  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 5:50 AM
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My question here (and all this does is serve to undermine Albuquerque's chances as well) is how can Albuquerque be competitive if Tucson isn't?
That's certainly a great question, given how I've framed the problem (workforce) . Albuquerque may be on somewhat even footing with Tucson as far as workforce supply - often that's considered the case. Phoenix would have an easier time supplying labor. Albuquerque may have other advantages like lack of political controversy or real advantages regarding water or power or transportation access. Not really sure. I'd be surprised if Tesla ended up there, or Reno (though Reno is closer to the SF Bay area).
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  #4746  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 8:53 PM
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Just thought I'd share this photo I thought was great from the Tucson Streetcar Facebook Page.
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  #4747  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2014, 2:48 AM
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Albuquerque has done a much better job than Tucson IMO developing itself from a large town to a million plus metro area city. They are almost our twin having both an Air Force Base and University as the anchors of their city, although UNM is nowhere near as good of an education nor as large as the U of A. While they have the benefit of being the main priority of the state while we have Phoenix and its suburbs to compete with over everything they seem to attract more national events, they have better freeway infrastructure, they have better recreation (example: the Sandia Peak Tramway which is pretty cool ive been on it), they have worked hard to improve industries such as film and music where they are starting to become quite successful (recent example being Breaking Bad), their sports teams especially their minor league baseball has been handled better than ours and is extremely popular. I guess my point is they are a less attractive destination than Tucson for retirees and people trying to avoid the cold, import/export, proximity to one of the largest metro areas in the country, as well as the massive amount of highly well educated people our University puts out (most of whom leave Tucson to find work) so we should have the edge on them in where we are in the growth of our cities economy/infrastructure etc but we really aren't, we are almost in the exact same spots in our growth.
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  #4748  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2014, 4:21 PM
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Albuquerque is a small town fighting to be a big city...and Tucson is a big city fighting to be a small town. They have a strong mayoral system...just like Phoenix...where Tucson is a Council/Manager run city with a competitive and massive unincorporated County with a strong County manager. We're all f@#$ed up. Rio Rancho is a nice complement to Albuquerque...we have Marana/Oro Valley.

The 2000s was a good decade for Albuquerque (I lived there in the 90s and it was not a cool place to be). They re-developed their downtown, fought to bring back their AAA Isotopes and have strongly supported that team. cdsuofa pointed out alot of good attributes to the city. I remember Gov. Richardson and the mayor of Albq. declaring that they were gonna bring an NFL team to the Duke City! It was a pipe dream...but I loved the enthusiasm. They want big things for the city.

However, I feel the 2010s has been a good decade for Tucson thus far. I hope we can close it out even stronger. Albuquerque is isolated, for good and bad, Tucson is not. Tucson needs to build on the good we have and not let the loonies ruin it all. IMHO, for the region...I feel Marana is gonna be the key.
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  #4749  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2014, 4:25 PM
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Originally Posted by southtucsonboy77 View Post
Albuquerque is a small town fighting to be a big city...and Tucson is a big city fighting to be a small town. They have a strong mayoral system...just like Phoenix...where Tucson is a Council/Manager run city with a competitive and massive unincorporated County with a strong County manager. We're all f@#$ed up. Rio Rancho is a nice complement to Albuquerque...we have Marana/Oro Valley.

The 2000s was a good decade for Albuquerque (I lived there in the 90s and it was not a cool place to be). They re-developed their downtown, fought to bring back their AAA Isotopes and have strongly supported that team. cdsuofa pointed out alot of good attributes to the city. I remember Gov. Richardson and the mayor of Albq. declaring that they were gonna bring an NFL team to the Duke City! It was a pipe dream...but I loved the enthusiasm. They want big things for the city.

However, I feel the 2010s has been a good decade for Tucson thus far. I hope we can close it out even stronger. Albuquerque is isolated, for good and bad, Tucson is not. Tucson needs to build on the good we have and not let the loonies ruin it all. IMHO, for the region...I feel Marana is gonna be the key.
The "isolated" point here is a good one. Tucson/Phoenix and the Sun Corridor create a economic zone that dwarfs all of New Mexico. Tucson can leverage the assets of the Phoenix area as needed, but Albuquerque is the largest game in town.
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  #4750  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2014, 6:35 AM
cdsuofa cdsuofa is offline
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Originally Posted by southtucsonboy77 View Post
Albuquerque is a small town fighting to be a big city...and Tucson is a big city fighting to be a small town. They have a strong mayoral system...just like Phoenix...where Tucson is a Council/Manager run city with a competitive and massive unincorporated County with a strong County manager. We're all f@#$ed up. Rio Rancho is a nice complement to Albuquerque...we have Marana/Oro Valley.

The 2000s was a good decade for Albuquerque (I lived there in the 90s and it was not a cool place to be). They re-developed their downtown, fought to bring back their AAA Isotopes and have strongly supported that team. cdsuofa pointed out alot of good attributes to the city. I remember Gov. Richardson and the mayor of Albq. declaring that they were gonna bring an NFL team to the Duke City! It was a pipe dream...but I loved the enthusiasm. They want big things for the city.

However, I feel the 2010s has been a good decade for Tucson thus far. I hope we can close it out even stronger. Albuquerque is isolated, for good and bad, Tucson is not. Tucson needs to build on the good we have and not let the loonies ruin it all. IMHO, for the region...I feel Marana is gonna be the key.
Good post. I agree that this decade is going more in our favor so far with a more enthusiastic and involved mayor atm and like we both said in our posts Tucson definitely has more going for it in many aspects many of which you mentioned. Tucson had previously lacked any enthusiasm or excitement for what could be, like ABQ had and we could never organize all of our government entities like the County board, City council and Mayor all on the same page to get anything done. Of course we all know the major issue of the loud group of mostly part time residents or retirees that shoot down every major project no matter the greater benefit to the City. Our City Council needs to stop getting spooked by these small groups because there will always be one. If X is beneficial to the greater good of the city and slightly impacts a small group they need to grow a pair and tell them sorry, but this will benefit many many more people than its slightly upsetting and Im sure you will get over it in a week or two. One lovely example is the group trying to keep the f-35 out of DM when the A-10 goes out of service leaving one of our main employers and economic contributors with no main mission most likely resulting in large downsizing. Ive read the sound statistics its nothing we cant deal with and before you tell me that's easy to say if you don't live in the flight path I live at 22nd and Alvernon and after a week you don't even notice the sound anymore. I think two big indicators of how this decade will go will be if Union Pacific gets to build its rail yard north of Tucson and the Canamex route doesn't completely miss Tucson, they either decide on the Avra valley route or directly through Tucson.

Last edited by cdsuofa; Mar 8, 2014 at 6:51 AM.
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  #4751  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2014, 1:57 PM
farmerk farmerk is offline
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Originally Posted by cdsuofa View Post
Good post. .... If X is beneficial to the greater good of the city and slightly impacts a small group they need to grow a pair and tell them sorry, but this will benefit many many more people than its slightly upsetting and Im sure you will get over it in a week or two. ....
"tell them sorry" is kinda nice. I'd say to go "f***" themselves .

Tucson really doesn't have any choice but to Go Up. Population keeps growing despite a few bumps and it's part of the Sun Corridor.

I've been googling about Tesla's Gigafactory and it doesn't look like Arizona will have a chance. One link mentions that the Union Pacific runs through Tucson...and so does El Paso and Albuquerque. But you'll never know ...
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  #4752  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2014, 10:47 PM
Patrick S Patrick S is offline
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Originally Posted by southtucsonboy77 View Post
Albuquerque is a small town fighting to be a big city...and Tucson is a big city fighting to be a small town. They have a strong mayoral system...just like Phoenix...where Tucson is a Council/Manager run city with a competitive and massive unincorporated County with a strong County manager. We're all f@#$ed up. Rio Rancho is a nice complement to Albuquerque...we have Marana/Oro Valley.

The 2000s was a good decade for Albuquerque (I lived there in the 90s and it was not a cool place to be). They re-developed their downtown, fought to bring back their AAA Isotopes and have strongly supported that team. cdsuofa pointed out alot of good attributes to the city. I remember Gov. Richardson and the mayor of Albq. declaring that they were gonna bring an NFL team to the Duke City! It was a pipe dream...but I loved the enthusiasm. They want big things for the city.

However, I feel the 2010s has been a good decade for Tucson thus far. I hope we can close it out even stronger. Albuquerque is isolated, for good and bad, Tucson is not. Tucson needs to build on the good we have and not let the loonies ruin it all. IMHO, for the region...I feel Marana is gonna be the key.
Granted, I haven't lived in Albuquerque, like you have, but I think your characterization of the ABQ. is a little unfair. The city's population was over 545,000 in 2010, while Tucson's was a little over 520,000. In fact, with a growth rate of 21.7% between 2000 and 2010 (Tucson's was 6.9%) the city passed Tucson to become the 32nd largest city in the country. The city has an estimated 2012 population of over 555,000 (an increase of 1.8% since 2010), while Tucson's 2012 estimated population was over 524,000 (an increase of only 0.8%). Now, they're metropolitan area population is about 90,000 less than Tucson's, but they have a larger metropolitan area population than El Paso (which had a population of almost 650,000 in 2010 and has a growth rate of 3.6% since then and is now over 672,000). ABQ has a Triple-A baseball team, we don't even have a single-A team. Though like Tucson International Airport they don't have any international flights (though I did see an article this last week saying TIA may soon have flights to Hermosillo), they do have flights to JFK in NYC (we have no flights to NYC). In fact, their airport had over 5.8 million passengers in 2010, TIA had less than 1.8 million in 2011.

This actually leads me to another point. Though I think we have many advantages because of our close proximity to Phoenix, I think there are some advantages to Albuquerque's relative isolation. If you're a business or company (or a touring musical act for that matter) and you want to locate in Arizona, where do you go? Most likely Phoenix. We usually don't stand a chance against that behemoth up the road. Albuquerque is 445 miles - over 6 hours drive (on I-25) south of Denver, and 268 miles - about a 3 hours 40 minute drive (I-25) north of El Paso. You want a foothold in New Mexico, you go to Albuquerque. You want a foothold between El Paso and Denver, you go to ABQ. Now, many businesses start out in Phoenix and eventually open offices or restaurants or whatever down here, but many don't. They stay in Phoenix. If you're flying into tucson, many people fly to Phoenix and drive down I-10. If you're flying to ABQ, you're flying to ABQ (or if you're flying to Santa Fe, which is a pretty big tourist destination).

But the main reason I'd say ABQ is just as big a city as Tucson - the metro GDP. ABQ's metro GDP in 2012 was 38.784 billion, an increase of 2.416 billion since 2009 (a 6.64% increase). Tucson's metro GDP in 2012 was 33.353 billion, an increase of 1.754 billion since 2009 (5.55% increase). So, even though the ABQ MSA has almost 100,000 less people, it has a higher GDP than the Tucson MSA (I'm assuming they're using the ABQ MSA and not the ABQ-Santa Fe-Las Vegas, NM Combined Statistical Area - which had a population of almost 1.15 million in 2010 - since they list Santa Fe's MSA separately).

I love Tucson, but I think it's safe to say if you're going to say Tucson is a big city then you have to say Albuquerque is too.
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  #4753  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2014, 6:55 AM
cdsuofa cdsuofa is offline
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"tell them sorry" is kinda nice. I'd say to go "f***" themselves .
haha yea I like ur response better. But all jokes aside this has been a real issue for our growth. There r so many projects I can think of that the city or county voted down because of a small group of opposition that makes it seems like nobody wants these things bcuz they r the only ones on the news crying or protesting or whatever. in so many cases they have scared the city r county into delaying or voting down projects. A few examples off the top of my head are the GCU campus(I hope they r visiting their historic golf course weekly), expanding Kolb between Sabino canyon and sunrise(been in limbo for 20 years and that stretch has just gotten much much worse as well as dangerous), The El Con Mall issues(every addition has been protested and made a huge ordeal), the small group that doesn't want the rail yard built south of Picacho Peak(Cmon the peak is next to one of the busiest stretches of freeway in the country its not going to disturb anyone), a few Avra Valley residents making it clear that they will die before a freeway can be built through there(expansion into that valley is happening and will continue its inevitable why not have a freeway to use?) and there have been mny more. Ita a serious issue how our boards just tuck their tail between their legs and turn things down that will greatly benefit the greater population
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  #4754  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2014, 4:40 PM
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Tucson going after Tesla's 6,500 new jobs

The city of Tucson has made a formal proposal to become the home of a $5 billion “gigafactory” for lithium-ion batteries for electric cars.

Tesla Motors Inc.’s planned 10 million-square-foot plant would need up to 1,000 acres of land and create about 6,500 jobs.

Mayor Jonathan Rothschild said land within the city has been identified with access to the Union Pacific mainline and the interstates.

He also said the city has tax incentives to add to whatever tax incentives are offered by the Arizona Commerce Authority to lure Tesla to the state.

Rothschild said he could not disclose any other information on the city’s proposal.

“But I can say I look forward to meeting with Tesla officials and impressing them with what we have to offer,” he said. “Tesla’s founder wants to put men on Mars and power the world with solar. All our efforts in the state ought to be to bring Tesla to Tucson.”

“We are the home to the Mars exploratory mission at the University of Arizona and known nationally as the Solar City,” Rothschild said. “I think Tesla will feel right at home in Tucson.”

Aside from Arizona, Tesla is looking at sites in Nevada, New Mexico and Texas for the plant, the company has said.

Meanwhile, Mesa Mayor Scott Smith — who is running for governor — announced that he had sent Tesla CEO Elon Musk an invitation to visit Arizona.

“Arizona is on the short list for electric-car maker Tesla Motors’ $5 billion-dollar battery plant along with 6,500 high-value jobs,” Smith wrote in an email from his campaign, announcing the invitation. “The move would complement Arizona’s aggressive push to make manufacturing a central component of our growing economy.”

While officials from the three other states in the running for the Tesla plant have all made statements about Tesla, this is the first time officials in Arizona have spoken about the state being considered.

“We are proud to hear that Arizona is among the finalists,” the letter to Musk said. “Tesla can join companies such as Intel, Boeing, Apple, Raytheon and Honeywell that have chosen to locate a substantial manufacturing presence in our state.”

The letter goes on to say Arizona has a skilled workforce, business-friendly tax structure and quality education.

“Regardless of where you might choose to locate within Arizona, you can be assured that infrastructure will be available to meet your needs,” it reads.

Aside from Smith, the current president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the letter was co-signed by Avondale Mayor Marie Lopez Rogers, immediate past president of the National League of Cities.

It was written on Maricopa Association of Government letterhead.

In response to emailed questions, CEO of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities Inc. Joe Snell wrote: “We believe that Southern Arizona is an ideal fit for Tesla’s new gigafactory.”

The key things Tesla has said it needs in a new site are “innovative manufacturing, reduction of logistics waste, optimization of co-located processes and reduced overhead.”

Analysts commenting to news outlets in the three other states have said a unique-approach proposal would get Tesla’s attention.

One unique approach is a program called Global Advantage.

It is a partnership between the University of Arizona Tech Parks and The Offshore Group that offers research and development at the tech park with manufacturing capabilities in Sonora. The program was recently endorsed by the governors of Sonora and Arizona.

“Global Advantage and the region Arizona-Sonora can bring a competitive advantage to Tesla,” said Offshore President Luis Felipe Seldner III. “This program distinguishes our region from the states we are competing with.”

Offshore owns and operates large industrial parks in Guaymas and Empalme, Sonora, and already has clients who are suppliers to Tesla, he said.

Seldner said what Telsa wants is available through this program — the expertise from the University of Arizona, solar and renewable energy initiatives in the region, simplified logistics and access to every market by road, rail and sea through the Port of Guaymas.

“We have exactly what Tesla is looking for,” Seldner said.

He said the Arizona Commerce Authority — which has taken the lead on wooing Tesla — has not approached Global Advantage about submitting a proposal.

Commerce Authority’s CEO Sandra Watson could not be reached for comment.

Tesla said it plans to directly invest $2 billion in the new plant, with the rest of the $5 billion coming from its partners.

A company timeline shows Tesla wants to pick the site this year, construct the facility in 2015 and begin production by 2017.

Last week, the company announced plans to add 30 new service centers and stores in Europe. The “supercharger” locations will let Tesla’s Model S cars travel longer distances, officials said.

Shares of Tesla stock are up around 600 percent in the past year. A recent analysis by Bloomberg News said the company is “the highest-flying automobile stock in at least two decades.”

Musk, the company founder, was born in South Africa and became a millionaire in his late twenties when he sold his company Zip2 to Compaq Computers. He helped launch PayPal in 2000, founded Space Explorations Technologies Corp. in 2002 and Tesla Motors in 2003.

In 2012, Musk launched the first commercial vehicle to the International Space Station.
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  #4755  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2014, 9:56 PM
Thirsty Thirsty is online now
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Lots of re/developement in the Daily Star this weekend.

South Sixth glows again at repurposed grocery


....

Also, I was a little surprised that there had previously been NO plan to run the trolley late on Thurs/Fri nights a.k.a. the time of the week 4th ave. is crawling with people.!!!

Ya know, it really is hard to stay mad at local government. If they were even mildly competant there really wouldn't be much to talk about here.
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  #4756  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2014, 11:24 PM
farmerk farmerk is offline
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Tucson going after Tesla's 6,500 new jobs
...
The city of Tucson has made a formal proposal to become the home of a $5 billion “gigafactory” for lithium-ion batteries for electric cars.
...
Don't know what they have in Albuquerque or even Phoenix but Tucson may have a shot at this after reading that article. Didn't know Mexico is a big supplier of Tesla. And Tucson does have it's own international rail port .

Trying to figure out where they could build this gigantic factory. Perhaps Kolb/I-10 or Houghton/I-10...rail is close by and there's a lot of empty space around that area. Keep our fingers crossed
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  #4757  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2014, 8:19 PM
ppdd ppdd is offline
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Don't know what they have in Albuquerque or even Phoenix but Tucson may have a shot at this after reading that article. Didn't know Mexico is a big supplier of Tesla. And Tucson does have it's own international rail port .

Trying to figure out where they could build this gigantic factory. Perhaps Kolb/I-10 or Houghton/I-10...rail is close by and there's a lot of empty space around that area. Keep our fingers crossed
One thing worth noting regarding proximity to rail: Phoenix is not on the UP main line - it's a spur. Tucson is better for rail access.
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  #4758  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2014, 4:28 PM
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One thing worth noting regarding proximity to rail: Phoenix is not on the UP main line - it's a spur. Tucson is better for rail access.
Dusting off my Econ Dev experience and knowledge...Tucson is the logical choice. If our local workforce "pool" is considered weak...a major manufacturing outfit will not only look locally, but statewide. Statewide, we definitely have the #s. We forget sometimes that people will relocate to the Tucson area. We have desirable communities on the outskirts such as Marana, Oro Valley, the Foothills, Vail, and even Sahuarita. The Tucson Mountains is another place we cannot forget. Since we were on the Albq discussion, Intel built a plant in Rio Rancho (I want to say in the 90s?) In no shape or form did Albq have the workforce to fill in all the projected jobs. People relocated, graduates came in, and the University system developed degrees and programs tailored fit for employment at Intel.

The only mystery(ies) is: did Tucson come in too late? Do we have a bad enough business friendly reputation to discourage a move here? And is someone else out there flaunting some kick a$$ incentives that we cannot match? If TREO found out about Tesla relatively around the same time I brought up the topic on this Thread...then TREO is not doing their job.
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  #4759  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2014, 5:04 PM
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Dusting off my Econ Dev experience and knowledge...Tucson is the logical choice. If our local workforce "pool" is considered weak...a major manufacturing outfit will not only look locally, but statewide. Statewide, we definitely have the #s. We forget sometimes that people will relocate to the Tucson area. We have desirable communities on the outskirts such as Marana, Oro Valley, the Foothills, Vail, and even Sahuarita. The Tucson Mountains is another place we cannot forget. Since we were on the Albq discussion, Intel built a plant in Rio Rancho (I want to say in the 90s?) In no shape or form did Albq have the workforce to fill in all the projected jobs. People relocated, graduates came in, and the University system developed degrees and programs tailored fit for employment at Intel.

The only mystery(ies) is: did Tucson come in too late? Do we have a bad enough business friendly reputation to discourage a move here? And is someone else out there flaunting some kick a$$ incentives that we cannot match? If TREO found out about Tesla relatively around the same time I brought up the topic on this Thread...then TREO is not doing their job.
You make some good points, certainly, and all those factors can offset the challenge; it may come down to how quickly the employment will need to scale to peak. We have had extreme challenges filling 1000 call center jobs, and jobs with skills and qualification are even harder. 6500 jobs is a huge challenge - but workforce supply will be an issue in any city, so maybe it will be less of a problem than it seems. Many jobs will have to be brought in - maybe the Mexico connection will be able to offset...

I don't think there's really a template for incentives available to this type of project. Even if they get $100 million in incentives, that's not big part of a project this size. There are so my unusual requirement for this project, it's hard to predict what will be deemed critical for Tesla. I still don't think this project will end up in Tucson, but it's hard to see where it will land on the shortlist they've floated.

Also, I can assure you that TREO knew about this project long before you did.

Last edited by ppdd; Mar 11, 2014 at 5:39 PM.
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  #4760  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2014, 5:24 PM
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Originally Posted by ppdd View Post
You make some good points, certainly, and all those factors can offset the challenge; it may come down to how quickly the employment will need to scale to peak. We have had extreme challenges filling 1000 call center jobs, and jobs with skills and qualification are even harder. 6500 jobs is a huge challenge - but it will be in any city, so maybe that will be less of an issue. May jobs will have to be brought in - maybe the Mexico connection will be able to offset...

I don't think there's really a template for incentives available to this type of project. Even if they get $100 million in incentives, that's not big part of a project this size. There are so my unusual requirement for this project, it's hard to predict what will be deemed critical for Tesla. I still don't think this project will end up in Tucson, but it's hard to see where it will land on the shortlist they've floated.

Also, I can assure you that TREO knew about this project long before you did.
I truly hope so ppdd! But we gotta be positive...I keep telling myself, "We will get Tesla. We will get Tesla." Lol.
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