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  #5581  
Old Posted Aug 19, 2015, 1:24 AM
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aznate27 aznate27 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmiller5 View Post
This is from the design meeting for the Residence Inn at Main Gate. Looks good to me.

https://www.tucsonaz.gov/files/pdsd/...ans_081315.pdf
Doesn't get more detailed than that, thanks for posting!
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  #5582  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2015, 9:54 PM
Patrick S Patrick S is offline
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Though this article doesn't even mention the Michael Kors store, there are some interesting things to note: Sounds like a hotel is all but assured, sounds like the possibility of an auto mall is real, looks like there were some initial thoughts of an outlet mall in Vail, and it's not for sure that the Foothills mall will survive - at least in its current form.

Michael Kors store joins Marana outlets; hotel, auto mall possible

A hotel developer is in escrow and plans to construct lodging on the site of a new outlet mall in Marana.

And, developers of Tucson Premium Outlets, near Interstate 10 and Twin Peaks Road, are in negotiations with car dealers in the hopes of opening a second auto mall.

“They know there’s a large population on the northwest side of town and they want to serve that population,” Casey Treadwell, with Vintage Partners told members of the Pima County Real Estate Council at their quarterly meeting Thursday.

In partnership with Simon Premium Outlets, Vintage has recruited and been sought out by many outlet retailers because of the mall’s location, Treadwell said.

“Many outlets told us they were looking to stay within the 75 miles of free trade zone,” he said. “They really want that Mexican market.”

Under a federal program, Mexican visitors with a border crossing cards can visit Arizona for up to 30 days but must stay within 75 miles of the border. For many shoppers, that puts outlets malls in Chandler, Scottsdale or Phoenix out of reach.

Tourism officials estimate shoppers from Mexico spend more than $7 million a day in Arizona at malls, restaurants and hotels.

J. Felipe Garcia, executive vice president at Visit Tucson, said those shoppers are closely following the progress of the new outlet mall.

“I get between 3,000 and 4,000 ‘likes’ from Mexico when I post something about the new outlet mall on Visit Tucson’s Facebook page,” he said.

Garcia met with developers and prospective tenants that were being recruited to the new mall and said they all inquired about Mexican shoppers.

“They all asked,” he said. “They all wanted to be sure it was within the border zone.”

Simon Premium Outlets also has outlet malls within the border zones of California and Texas.

In response to questions from the audience about a second outlet in Vail, Treadwell said the outlets have conducted their own market studies and determined, “Tucson is a one-premium-outlet market.”

Asked how the new outlet might impact Foothill Mall, Treadwell said, “In my opinion, Foothills won’t remain an outlet mall.”

He predicted that the mall would take a different direction with its retailers.

Regina Harmon, general manager of Foothills Mall, said corporate directive was that she should not comment on the mall’s future plans.

Mall owner Schottenstein Property Group has Foothill Mall as the featured property on its website homepage.

Calls to the corporate office in Columbus, Ohio Thursday afternoon resulted in three hang-ups.

Tucson Premium Outlets is scheduled to open in October.
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  #5583  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2015, 6:15 PM
Ted Lyons Ted Lyons is offline
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Rob Paulus has a pretty significant multi-phased project on his website slated for the corner of 4th & 4th. I haven't heard anything about it so I'm curious what the status is.

http://robpaulus.com/projects/trinity-mixed-use/



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  #5584  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2015, 5:06 PM
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ha, like there's anyone wearing a business suit in Tucson! right.....
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  #5585  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2015, 6:04 PM
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Originally Posted by somethingfast View Post
ha, like there's anyone wearing a business suit in Tucson! right.....
You got that right!

Is it just me, or do all Rob Paulus projects look alike?
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  #5586  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2015, 3:02 AM
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Just laying low over here to see if they can find me. Hahahahahaha
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  #5587  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2015, 1:05 PM
Thirsty Thirsty is offline
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Urban Heat Island

Some data out of NASA shows the heat island effect really isn't a big deal in the desert.

Tucson's development shows an exceptionally low impact of zero to one degree C, or fewer than 2*F.

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=86440
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  #5588  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2015, 1:42 AM
Patrick S Patrick S is offline
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Here we go again. This isn't a good sign.

Rio Nuevo board: last chance for hotel deal

The Rio Nuevo board agreed to give one more last chance to a hotel developer in downtown Tucson.

Nor-Generations has until the end of September to close on the purchase of 8.5 acres of Rio Nuevo-owned land, or the board will consider the deal dead.

The whole thing hinges on the city agreeing to speed up the process of relocating the temporary Greyhound bus depot that’s located on the site. But the city doesn’t agree with the accelerated schedule.

Last year, Rio Nuevo asked for bids to buy and develop the 8.5-acre undeveloped site between Interstate 10 and the Tucson Convention Center.

After a controversial procurement process, the board chose developer Allan Norville, manager of Nor-Generations.

His bid included paying Rio Nuevo $5.6 million for the land. Norville owns an adjacent 10 acres and has offered various hotel and exhibition hall proposals for the site for the past 20 years.

This plan would bring a hotel, exhibition hall, apartments and museums.

The board signed a contract with Norville in January. Since then, Norville has paid for environmental site assessments, preliminary development plans and a hotel franchise agreement.

Rio Nuevo gave him 120 days to close on the property, and then gave him a series of extensions. The closing date was to have been July 27, and the deal was technically terminated on that date, although talks have continued.

The latest extension — which the board said will be the last — was granted Tuesday and gives Norville until the end of September.

If he meets the deadline, he then has six months to submit a development plan to the city.

Once the city signs off on the plans, Rio Nuevo would give Greyhound one year to relocate at the city’s expense. That was part of the city’s settlement agreement with Rio Nuevo.

With the depot out of the way, the developer has 3.5 years to invest at least $10   million in hard construction costs on the property or face a $2.5 million penalty under the Rio Nuevo contract.

But moving the depot may be a bigger problem that any of the parties expected.

The City Council was ready to vote on this schedule at meetings in June and July, but the item was postponed when Norville started talks to speed up the relocation of Greyhound, said City Attorney Mike Rankin.

Norville wants the one-year notice to be issued as soon as the sale closes — and that’s the sticking point the city won’t agree to.

“The property cannot be developed with the Greyhound station sitting in the middle of it,” Nor-Generations attorney Pat Lopez told the Rio Nuevo board Tuesday.

Tying the relocation of the depot to the city’s approval of the development plans gives the city an incentive not to approve the plans, Lopez said.

“If the city doesn’t agree to it in September, the city’s really saying to us and anyone else who buys that property that Greyhound is going to be there indefinitely,” Lopez said. “Why would you buy a piece of property where a third party gets to decide who occupies it, collects the rent from that party and tells you you can’t develop it, and you’re facing a multi-million-dollar penalty if you don’t develop it? I’m not sure who you’re ever going to find who’s going to say I want to buy that property under those conditions.”

He spelled out the worst-case scenario: “We have done a lot of work to get our development plans in place,” Lopez told the board. “We don’t want to be in a situation where we’re ready to go but can’t because Greyhound is there and then the market changes and we lose the financing and we can’t do the deal.” Add to that the possible financial penalty.

Board chair Fletcher McCusker told Lopez that the Rio Nuevo downtown redevelopment district shouldn’t get involved in the talks with the city to alter the agreed-upon schedule.

“We’re of the opinion that Nor-Gen should close with us,” he said, “and if you guys want to fight with the city about the location of the Greyhound, God bless you.”

“It seems like we’re all paper tigers here, trying to put pressure on the city to agree to something they don’t seem to be inclined to agree with,” McCusker said.

The city wants Nor-Generations to close on the land and develop the project, the city is not interesting in delaying the project, and the city is committed to meeting its obligation to pay to relocate Greyhound, Rankin said.

The city, Nor-Generations and Greyhound are still working on a new site, he said, including a possible city-owned property near 22nd Street and Kino Boulevard.

Lopez said Nor-Gen has agreed to bid on whatever terms the city dictates on the sale of the property.
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  #5589  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2015, 9:00 AM
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I'd split that Rio Nuevo land to several developers instead of one developer.

Looks like the website of Tucson Marketplace at the Bridges is undergoing updates. I hope something new comes up.
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  #5590  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2015, 4:22 PM
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Nor-Gen

A lot more questions than answers came out of the Daily Star article, which shouldn't be the case:

Would the site at 22nd/Kino on City land for Greyhound be permanent or temporary...and how would that affect Peach's Ronstadt proposal? I like the idea of Greyhound being on the fringe of downtown...22nd/Kino isn't a strong transit spot either.

If the deal with Nor-Gen doesn't work out...would Peach want to take over the development? Would they be able to handle two large developments IF they won the Ronstadt gig?

A few weeks ago I checked in on Nor's site to see if anything has been going on...and I found this: GJX Admin Building. This was submitted back in Feb/March 2015...it feels like an attempt to show that they're doing something...yet, the City caught many missing pieces in their review. I expected a more comprehensive plan for the overall development, not a piece-meal. I don't know, I hope it works out and things move forward.
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  #5591  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2015, 4:57 PM
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Tucson Market Continues Retail Rebound

Here's the stated Outlook:

In the absence of speculative construction, look for improved vacancy in the second half of 2015. Retailers along the Broadway corridor have mounted pressure on the City government to adopt a final design and give certainty to the business community, which faces frequent neighborhood opposition to any change to the corridor realignment design. Passage of the fall Pima County bond initiatives would represent a stimulus; proposed City charter change would be positive for the region; and the Tucson Metro Chamber is leading efforts to augment direct air service and streamline business approval processes.
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  #5592  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2015, 6:36 PM
hthomas hthomas is offline
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This is why we can't have nice things...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick S View Post
Here we go again. This isn't a good sign.

Rio Nuevo board: last chance for hotel deal

The Rio Nuevo board agreed to give one more last chance to a hotel developer in downtown Tucson.

Nor-Generations has until the end of September to close on the purchase of 8.5 acres of Rio Nuevo-owned land, or the board will consider the deal dead.

The whole thing hinges on the city agreeing to speed up the process of relocating the temporary Greyhound bus depot that’s located on the site. But the city doesn’t agree with the accelerated schedule.

Last year, Rio Nuevo asked for bids to buy and develop the 8.5-acre undeveloped site between Interstate 10 and the Tucson Convention Center.

After a controversial procurement process, the board chose developer Allan Norville, manager of Nor-Generations.

His bid included paying Rio Nuevo $5.6 million for the land. Norville owns an adjacent 10 acres and has offered various hotel and exhibition hall proposals for the site for the past 20 years.

This plan would bring a hotel, exhibition hall, apartments and museums.

The board signed a contract with Norville in January. Since then, Norville has paid for environmental site assessments, preliminary development plans and a hotel franchise agreement.

Rio Nuevo gave him 120 days to close on the property, and then gave him a series of extensions. The closing date was to have been July 27, and the deal was technically terminated on that date, although talks have continued.

The latest extension — which the board said will be the last — was granted Tuesday and gives Norville until the end of September.

If he meets the deadline, he then has six months to submit a development plan to the city.

Once the city signs off on the plans, Rio Nuevo would give Greyhound one year to relocate at the city’s expense. That was part of the city’s settlement agreement with Rio Nuevo.

With the depot out of the way, the developer has 3.5 years to invest at least $10   million in hard construction costs on the property or face a $2.5 million penalty under the Rio Nuevo contract.

But moving the depot may be a bigger problem that any of the parties expected.

The City Council was ready to vote on this schedule at meetings in June and July, but the item was postponed when Norville started talks to speed up the relocation of Greyhound, said City Attorney Mike Rankin.

Norville wants the one-year notice to be issued as soon as the sale closes — and that’s the sticking point the city won’t agree to.

“The property cannot be developed with the Greyhound station sitting in the middle of it,” Nor-Generations attorney Pat Lopez told the Rio Nuevo board Tuesday.

Tying the relocation of the depot to the city’s approval of the development plans gives the city an incentive not to approve the plans, Lopez said.

“If the city doesn’t agree to it in September, the city’s really saying to us and anyone else who buys that property that Greyhound is going to be there indefinitely,” Lopez said. “Why would you buy a piece of property where a third party gets to decide who occupies it, collects the rent from that party and tells you you can’t develop it, and you’re facing a multi-million-dollar penalty if you don’t develop it? I’m not sure who you’re ever going to find who’s going to say I want to buy that property under those conditions.”

He spelled out the worst-case scenario: “We have done a lot of work to get our development plans in place,” Lopez told the board. “We don’t want to be in a situation where we’re ready to go but can’t because Greyhound is there and then the market changes and we lose the financing and we can’t do the deal.” Add to that the possible financial penalty.

Board chair Fletcher McCusker told Lopez that the Rio Nuevo downtown redevelopment district shouldn’t get involved in the talks with the city to alter the agreed-upon schedule.

“We’re of the opinion that Nor-Gen should close with us,” he said, “and if you guys want to fight with the city about the location of the Greyhound, God bless you.”

“It seems like we’re all paper tigers here, trying to put pressure on the city to agree to something they don’t seem to be inclined to agree with,” McCusker said.

The city wants Nor-Generations to close on the land and develop the project, the city is not interesting in delaying the project, and the city is committed to meeting its obligation to pay to relocate Greyhound, Rankin said.

The city, Nor-Generations and Greyhound are still working on a new site, he said, including a possible city-owned property near 22nd Street and Kino Boulevard.

Lopez said Nor-Gen has agreed to bid on whatever terms the city dictates on the sale of the property.
So we are letting a trailer (I could be wrong but I really think it is just a trailer from driving by it) that we call a greyhound bus station dictate the growth of downtown. "farmerk's" suggestion to split up the lot is great. I keep getting my hopes up for something to happen and then this... Come on Tucson.
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  #5593  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2015, 7:06 PM
Patrick S Patrick S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmerk View Post
I'd split that Rio Nuevo land to several developers instead of one developer.

Looks like the website of Tucson Marketplace at the Bridges is undergoing updates. I hope something new comes up.
I've been checking on the Tucson Marketplace at the Bridges website almost every day for the past 2-3 weeks to see when it will come back up. I'm hoping their adding something about the new theatre, which I haven't seen construction starting on that even though it was announced 3 months ago and they want it open by next summer. But, since Tucson is the type of city that construction can occur year round, maybe it will be starting soon. The only thing semi-official I can find about the theatre (the only thing at all besides press releases from May) is this: http://www.landadvisors.com/pdf/AZ-Pima-127983.pdf
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  #5594  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2015, 10:35 AM
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  #5595  
Old Posted Yesterday, 3:35 PM
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National companies eyeing Tucson's logistics potential

The industrial market in Tucson is getting new attention from distribution companies that once snubbed the Old Pueblo for locations in California, Nevada and Texas.

Hovering at around 10 percent vacancy, industrial space around town is being absorbed and subdivided to accommodate smaller businesses, and new construction is afoot.

Regional logistics company OnTrac is expected to announce this week its plans to lease more than 56,000 square feet at Rockefeller Group Distribution Center, south of Valencia and Palo Verde roads.

Three other major distribution centers are in varying degrees of construction.
Furniture retailer HomeGoods is constructing an 800,000-square-foot distribution center in the 3600 bock of East Corona Road, near the airport.

FedEx expects to open its new 210,000-square-foot ground distribution center this fall at 7050 S. Palo Verde Road.

And Ventana Medical Systems is close to completing its 60,000-square-foot logistics and distribution center in Tangerine Commerce Park on Tangerine Road, near Interstate 10.

“From about 2008 to 2013, significant companies were not looking at Tucson,” said Rob Glaser, industrial specialist with commercial real estate company Picor. “A couple of years ago we started to see an improvement in the amount of economic development activity in the industrial market.”

He said strategic marketing on the part of the city, county and state, coupled with a healing national economy, all played a role.

“Tucson is a good place … with its proximity to interstates and Mexico, good skilled labor and minimal traffic and natural-disaster issues,” Glaser said.

Industrial landlords have been subdividing spaces in order to attract smaller tenants that have manufacturing operations in Sonora, Mexico, and need U.S. distribution space, he said.

“Small business has come back to the industrial market,” Glaser said. “There are many business parks that accommodate the 1,200- to 2,000-square-foot tenants that are making widgets, custom machining or are vendors to the manufacturing and aerospace industry.”

Glaser predicts the vacancy rate in industrial space in Tucson will drop to 8 percent within 18 months.

“We’ve got pretty good momentum going,” he said.

FAST-GROWING FIRM MOVING IN

OnTrac, a regional overnight package delivery service, has operations in California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Utah, Colorado and Idaho.

From the new Tucson facility, located in the Rockefeller Group Distribution Center, the company will offer shipping and same-day messenger services.

Mark Singerman, regional director of Rockefeller’s Arizona office, said the arrival of OnTrac will bring the center’s occupancy rate to 80 percent.

The remaining space is being eyed by other logistics companies that want to be near the airport, I-10 and I-19, he said.

“Tucson is one of our fastest-growing markets, and we are excited to be moving to the Rockefeller group facility,” said Thomas Fischer, chief financial officer for OnTrac. “Being a regional carrier, we are always looking to provide increased capabilities while reducing cost. This move will help us do that while providing delivery service to area businesses.”

OnTrac is headquartered in Chandler and among the state’s fastest-growing businesses. Terms of the Tucson lease were not disclosed. In 2014, the company began a “last-mile” delivery service in conjunction with the U.S. Postal Service.

Hiring figures were not immediately available, but employment information can be found at ontrac.com under the “News” category.

ATTRACTIONS INCLUDE INCENTIVES, GEOGRAPHY

Earlier this year, HomeGoods bought 100 acres for $9.5 million to build its distribution center.

A combined city/county incentive package totals more than $6 million over 15 years. The company plans to hire at least 400 people initially and grow to 900 workers.

The $2.4 million investment by FedEx in a new distribution center was prompted by Tucson’s geography and workforce.

“The site was chosen because of its ease of access to major highways, its proximity to customers’ distribution centers and a strong local community workforce for recruiting employees,” Nikki Mendicino, a FedEx spokeswoman, said via email.

The new facility will replace the existing 114,000-square-foot station near I-19 and Irvington Road, and the company anticipates increasing its number of employees.

“We will add to the overall area workforce as necessary to support increased demand for service,” Mendicino said.

Ventana Medical Systems, with a workforce of about 1,100 people, became the first tenant of the Tangerine Commerce Park with its 60,000-square-foot distribution center.

Company officials cited access to I-10 and being close to their Oro Valley headquarters as reasons for choosing the site.

‘WE’RE IN THE GAME’

Job creation is the main reason for enthusiasm about the growth in the industrial sector.

“People are getting back into the game,” said Terry Lavery, an associate broker with Tucson Realty & Trust, who is also fielding calls about industrial space, especially from smaller businesses.

“I know everyone wants the grand slam,” he said of the desire to lure a major employer, “but the small businesses are really the job starters, hiring five or six people, absorbing the 5,000-square-foot spaces.

“Several of those is a different kind of grand slam.”

Cost and regulations associated with doing business in surrounding states have also helped Tucson.

“A lot of national clients are seriously considering Tucson, which is great,” said Ike Isaacson, managing director of CBRE’s Tucson office. “We’re in the game.”

Now that the local population has reached 1 million, companies know there’s a workforce ready, he said.

“That and some of the primary markets are getting so congested, competitive and expensive, such as California with its tax and water concerns,” Isaacson said. “I’m optimistic that we’re being considered; that’s all you can ask for. The rest is up to us.”

Creation of a logistics hub in Tucson is a long-told story, but action by Pima County and the city of Tucson is making it real, industry experts say.

One example is the proposed Sonoran Corridor, which would create a bypass route between Interstates 10 and 19 south of Tucson International Airport and extension of the realigned former Hughes Access Road, also south of the airport.

County officials believe the area can attract industrial and commercial growth because of proximity to the railroad and both interstates.

Another is the recent signing of a 50-year lease between the Tucson Airport Authority and the city of Tucson.

The previous lease was set to expire in 2048, and the new lease allows the TAA to offer longer-term leases to prospective tenants.

TAA’s master plan includes opening up thousands of acres of airport-owned land for commercial development to lure more cargo and cross-border freight activity.

“We are beginning to see the results of our work to identify Tucson as a trade and transportation center,” Mayor Jonathan Rothschild said.

“Our strategic geographic position makes it easy to recruit the right businesses. We are on the front end of this growth, not the end.”
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  #5596  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:10 PM
kaneui kaneui is offline
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TIA Air Traffic Control Tower

Here's a time-lapse construction video of Tucson International's new 252-ft. air traffic control tower, scheduled for completion in late 2016:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6PMY_QM75I

(For comparison, Phoenix' control tower is 326 ft., while the new tower in Las Vegas will be 352 ft., second only in North America to Atlanta's at 398 ft.)
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